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dying eggs with vegetable dyes  RSS feed

 
Judith Browning
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I thought I knew what I was doing...because I am a fabric dyer I thought dying eggs would be a breeze. I spent the morning playing in the kitchen with unsatisfactory results...and worse yet soft shells on the eggs because I decided to play with PH like I would with fabric and added a little baking soda once and then a little vinegar...beautiful foam and an amazing change in color for the tumeric...I am happy with the color of the bits of linen and cotton fabric I included in the pot.
Here are a few pictures...and maybe someone will post some successes

these are probably too many pictures for a failed experiment.

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onion skins after about an hour simmer
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sorted out whitest eggs
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onion skin dye bath
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one tablespoon turmeric to a quart rain water
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cloth after adding baking soda to turmeric dye bath
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yellow eggs/redish cloth (turmeric) and reddish eggs/orangish cloth (onion skins)
 
R Scott
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They look beautiful. Although probably not bright enough for some kids.

We just bought araucana chickens so we have easter eggs all year.
 
Judith Browning
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R Scott wrote:They look beautiful. Although probably not bright enough for some kids.

We just bought araucana chickens so we have easter eggs all year.



naturally blue and green eggs...how fun!

The irony here is that the onion skin eggs are almost the same dark brown
as the eggs that I sorted out as too dark to dye
I will have to limit this experiment until I get some good advice...
we can't eat this many boiled eggs and it is taking more time to clean up than to do....
 
Leila Rich
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Beetroot dyes the shells a fantasic pink; or the egg itself if you're cracking the shell half way through for a 'tie-dyed- egg
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Judith did you ever figure out how to do this? I used to use vegetable dyes with my kids at Easter. And, lo, Erica Strauss posted about it here: http://www.nwedible.com/sunprint-naturally-dye-easter-eggs/.



And here's more instructions at http://radmegan.com/2012/03/natural-egg-dye-a-rainbow-of-options.html. I usually didn't get mine quite as dark as hers, but I usually did create almost this many different colors.



I just love these!

 
Judith Browning
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Those are beautiful, Jocelyn I didn't get around to trying again this year.....I've had a hard time finding 'homegrown' white eggs and lately our egg person has only really dark brown ones. Your links and pictures have inspired me though so maybe I'll be ready for next year.
 
Danielle Diver
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we JUST got done with ours! This year we tried :

Matcha Powder (some old stuff laying around) didnt work, not shown
Elderberry (dried, crushed, and boiled into an infusion before eggs added) worked slightly well, but not totally great
Tumeric, the yellowy ones
and some old Logwood (Haematoxylum campechianum) dye from 15 years ago found in the garage, that one was a HIT!
we did the plant wrap deco thing. it was fun, a bit of work, but the plants that worked the best for us were dandilion and (wild) strawberry leaves

picture! my two year old will have kinda fun finding them, totally fun peeling them, and will probably throw a toddler fit when we eat them!! happy hunting!

edit: these are made with brown eggs
edit2: we polished with pork lard , REALLY makes them shine!
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Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Danielle Diver wrote:we JUST got done with ours! This year we tried :

Matcha Powder (some old stuff laying around) didnt work, not shown
Elderberry (dried, crushed, and boiled into an infusion before eggs added) worked slightly well, but not totally great
Tumeric, the yellowy ones
and some old Logwood (Haematoxylum campechianum) dye from 15 years ago found in the garage, that one was a HIT!
we did the plant wrap deco thing. it was fun, a bit of work, but the plants that worked the best for us were dandilion and (wild) strawberry leaves

picture! my two year old will have kinda fun finding them, totally fun peeling them, and will probably throw a toddler fit when we eat them!! happy hunting!

edit: these are made with brown eggs
edit2: we polished with pork lard , REALLY makes them shine!


they are beautiful, Danielle....check into the toxicity of logwood though.......I always avoided it as a fabric dye because I thought it was more toxic than others. It could be I'm thinking of the dust from working the wood though.
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Gorgeous, Danielle! I like how earthy the tones turned out.
 
Olenka Kleban
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Ah, yes! An egg that is boiled with plant imprints (using leaves or petals to resist dye for a white/light 'silhouette') is called Lystovka (from the word "lystia" - leaves), or Halunka. They are a great example of using a plant's inherent beauty to sing on the alluring curved surface of the egg.

I met a wonderful woman this spring who told me about her childhood memory of living in Ukraine and making Halunky:
In preparation for Easter, she would visit the village of her grandmother. Grandmother would give the task of making little vytynankas (paper cut-outs, from the word 'vytynaty'- to cut) to the grandchildren. Grandmother would place an egg in a long stocking, put a vytynanka put against the egg in the stocking, then twist the stocking like a sausage before putting the next egg in. She'd then have a long, delicate, heavy chain of eggs in the stocking ready to immerse into a pot of water with onion skins that she had saved all year just for this purpose. After cooking, the eggs were slipped out of the stocking one by one, all of deep red with white silhouettes of the paper motifs.

 
Olenka Kleban
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Here's a video by Marta Iwanek about making pysanky using natural/plant dyes.

Pysanky (from the word "pysaty'- to write) are made using the batik method for dyeing. So, wax being the thing that resists the dye to make motifs, a hot dye bath cannot be used (the wax will melt and the motif will be gone! and the egg will cook, which is undesirable for pysanky). So, all recipes touched on in this video are all for cool dye baths.


 
Jocelyn Campbell
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I just looove dyeing eggs this way for Easter, so I glommed onto a new blog post with some useful tips.

How to Dye Easter Eggs Naturally with Every Day Ingredients



And now, I'm sold on trying this with blown out eggs and making wildflower-seed-filled confetti eggs!

So many fun things to do, so little time! #firstworldproblem

 
John Weiland
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This has probably come up before as an edible item, but thought it would go good in this thread as well. If you like and make pickled eggs with beet juice, the dye penetrates the shell (below).

One recipe here: http://www.thisamericanbite.com/pickled-eggs/
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Jocelyn Campbell
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John Weiland wrote:This has probably come up before as an edible item, but thought it would go good in this thread as well. If you like and make pickled eggs with beet juice, the dye penetrates the shell (below).

One recipe here: http://www.thisamericanbite.com/pickled-eggs/


That is some brilliant coloring! Just stunning!

Soy sauce is another one I've heard about, though with not-so-vibrant results I imagine. Haven't done either myself.

If I recall, I think if soaked in one or the other with a crackled, but still intact shell it makes a lovely pattern on the egg, too.
 
laura Iverson
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Dyed using red onion skins, purple cabbage and zeller boletes.
eggs.jpg
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