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Paleo diet  RSS feed

 
Chuck Freeman
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Location: Southcentral Alaska
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I found this while doing some research gathering, it's kind of interesting.

PALEO DIET
 
                        
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http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/08/0831_050831_chimp_genes.html

the same argument could be made for a basic primate diet since we share high levels of dna with the other primates.  If we look at what they eat, we should see what a basic primate diet would look like:



http://www.wildchimps.org/wcf/english/files/chimp4.htm

Since chimps share 96% dna with humans and they are omnivores just like us, looking at what they eat would be an excellent indicator of what we should be eating ---- not Kellogs cornflakes.

Orangs are also closely related to humans and they are also omnivores:

http://www.springerlink.com/content/9hr7xwp777t5702w/

Orangs in the wild commonly eat some 300 or 400 different varieties of food - including some animal food.  They are more sedentary than chimps, who more like humans have extensive ranges within which they move around to maximize their food sources.

Unlike modern populations, paleo man walked and walked and walked to get food.  Still living in  trees -- and moving throughout the forest canopy --- is not exactly a sedentary life either.  And I doubt if any one of us inventoried our pantries if we would find more than 300 different items of food.
 
Abe Connally
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Location: Chihuahua Desert
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If you want to compare species, compare their digestion tracts, not just the DNA.  After all, we share 50% of our DNA with plants, but none of us can survive on what plants eat.

Gorillas are mainly vegetarian, but their digestive system is WAY different than ours.

We have much more of a carnivorous digestive tract than a herbavore one.  In fact, our digestive tract looks more like a dog's than a gorilla's, yet we share much more DNA with the gorilla.

I think Paleo and Permaculture go hand in hand. Reduce your intake of annuals, include meats and animal fats, take out the grains, and eat perennial vegetables.  Sounds pretty good and sustainable to me!
 
                        
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Actually gorillas and hominids have very similar digestive tracts.  Both are omnivores.

http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/full/127/10/2000

Photo:  albert courtesy San Diego Zoo.

albert.jpg
[Thumbnail for albert.jpg]
 
Kirk Hutchison
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
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    This ties in quite nicely with my previous permaculture ideas/plans. A 5 acre forest garden, lots of ponds, and a 5 acre meadow surrounded by anywhere between 10 and 50 acres of forest. You get all of your vegs from the forest garden, plus nuts, raise chickens and pigs on scraps and grazing in the meadow, maybe some cows, goats, sheep, some beehives, etc. The forest could provide timber, firewood, wild game, and wild berries (especially blackberries!). You could have a hill with a couple wind turbines, or a little watermill on a stream. This should provide just about everything you need.
 
Abe Connally
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Location: Chihuahua Desert
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Gorillas have both the smallest brains and the largest digestive tracts of any primate (in relation to body size).  We have the largest brains and shortest digestive tract.

Gorillas contain the fermentative bacteria necessary to digest cellulose. Humans do not.

As far as diets go, Paleo done the way Kirk mentions is probably one of the most sustainable and easiest systems we know of.  With 5 acres forest garden and a 5 acre meadow, you could easily feed 20 people without much work at all (mostly harvest and tending to animals).

Also, in those woods, let your pigs go in periodically to grass fungus and nuts, like acorns.  The goats could be let in a bit as well, and they'll manage brush and bramble.

VERY NICE, Kirk!
 
                        
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Kirk:  It sounds great.  I just bought some blackberries to put in here this spring.

I would look at the food forest models -- but also look around to see if there is any natural vegetation left in your area and consider if any of those plants are edible.

I am in Alabama now -- so my 'food forest' is based on pecans.  (My house is in an old pecan orchard).  But here is the natural 'food forest' I grew up with in Northern Michigan.\

http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/forum/feature-articles/3864-food-forest-example-northern-michigan-forest.html

 
Kevin EarthSoul
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Abe Connally wrote:Gorillas have both the smallest brains and the largest digestive tracts of any primate (in relation to body size).  We have the largest brains and shortest digestive tract.

Gorillas contain the fermentative bacteria necessary to digest cellulose. Humans do not.

As far as diets go, Paleo done the way Kirk mentions is probably one of the most sustainable and easiest systems we know of.  With 5 acres forest garden and a 5 acre meadow, you could easily feed 20 people without much work at all (mostly harvest and tending to animals).

Also, in those woods, let your pigs go in periodically to grass fungus and nuts, like acorns.  The goats could be let in a bit as well, and they'll manage brush and bramble.

VERY NICE, Kirk!


Goats also happily eat poison ivy.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
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