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Warré Hives For The Beginner

 
Quintin Holmberg
Posts: 32
Location: Minnesota
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I'd like to start reading up on Warré hives. If some of you who have already done this research could supply me with some of your favorite links, I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks.
 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
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Location: Vermont, off grid for 22 years!
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PDF of his book available here
 
Quintin Holmberg
Posts: 32
Location: Minnesota
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Thank you, Cj. I was making my way through that website but had totally missed the ebook link on the left.
 
tel jetson
steward
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Location: woodland, washington
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David Heaf's site (warre.biobees.org, which you already seem to have found) probably has the best collection of information and links available.

David's books are also excellent. better, I dare say, than Warré's.
 
edwin lake
Posts: 44
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I like Michael Bush's The Practical Beekeeper. He doesn't advocate Warre per se, but I like his ideas and you can incorporate Langstroth's medium 8 frame boxes into a Warre design as they are just about the same size as what Warre recommended. I just built a Warre quilt with a telescoping top to fit the top of the langstroth 8-frame medium hive boxes. It also solved the problem of removable frames, which are required in NC to be legal.
 
tel jetson
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edwin lake wrote:It also solved the problem of removable frames, which are required in NC to be legal.


movable frames aren't required, just movable comb. if the combs are relatively straight, they can be removed from top bar hives for inspection in a fairly simple fashion, no frames required. just need to sever the connections to the wall of the hive first and avoid rotating the comb about its weakest axis: the top bar.

of course, ensuring straight combs is easier said than done. instead of adopting one of the more harmful of beekeeping innovations (movable frames), I recommend a program of benign criminality: thoughtful camouflaging of unregistered hives. not nearly as difficult as one might think. just remember that loose lips sink ships and honey bribes can be very effective.
 
Emily Cressey
Posts: 45
Location: Lynnwood, WA. USA
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I am building a Warre' out of 2x4 lumber. It's going to be 4 boxes and heavy - there is no way I will be able to Nadir it when it is full...

Can you just stack it with all your boxes - all 4 in my case - and leave it there all year?

I plan to do a Spring Honey harvest, so I would just (once a year) take apart all the boxes - unstack them and put them on the ground so I could put that 4th box back in the bottom of the stack.

Would that work, or would it be too disruptive to the bees?

Thanks,

Emily
 
tel jetson
steward
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Location: woodland, washington
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Emily Cressey wrote:Would that work, or would it be too disruptive to the bees?


if it's just once each year, I think you would be fine. you'll need to build more than four boxes so that you have some empties to replace what you harvest. if you get a vigorous colony and a strong nectar flow, it might be beneficial to have more than four boxes on the hive at one time, as well. as many as six is reasonable, though things get rather precarious beyond that.
 
Emily Cressey
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Location: Lynnwood, WA. USA
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Six?? I like the way you think. With so many of the beehive kits being sold with just two boxes, I thought I was being optimistic with 4. I am in the Seattle area, I see you are also in Washington. I suppose that makes us neighbors - so thanks for the neighborly advice, Tel.

Emily
 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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Bigger hives space is supposedly harder to heat in the winter, but I don't see wild hives the size of their logs or wall spaces.

The extra thickness of 2x lumber should be a little warmer. How harsh are your winter?

I am liking the idea of "set and forget" as "beyond zero treatment"
 
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