I just dropped the price of
the permaculture playing cards
for a wee bit.

 

 

uses include:
- infecting brains with permaculture
- convincing folks that you are not crazy
- gift giving obligations
- stocking stuffer
- gambling distraction
- an hour or two of reading
- find the needle
- find the 26 hidden names

clickity-click-click

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How to sun dry large fruits such as apples(also, cheesemaking)  RSS feed

 
C.M Ward
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How should I sun dry apples and other larger fruits that I can't just leave in the sun as is like I can for plums, grapes, and berries(Technically grapes are berries and raspberries are not but I am referring to fruits with berry at the end not the technical berry)?

Also I have heard that you can age cheddar for up to 12 years.

I bet that 12 year old cheddar has so much cheddar flavor that just like a tablespoon of it or so is equivalent to 1 cup of mild cheddar.

Also I bet that 12 year old cheddar has such strong cheddar flavor that it most commonly stays with the family that aged the cheddar for that long like how peewee size chicken eggs are never sold but jumbo are.

I think that the maximum age sold for cheddar is like I don't know, maybe somewhere around 5 years, maybe 5<x<12, maybe 2<x<5. By x I mean an unknown value.

As for the naming of cheddar based on age if you had 12 year old cheddar and decided to go with the extra * x sharp than that would be 11 extras before the sharp which is so much that after the cheddar is 3 years they just say "This is the age of the cheddar" instead of saying mild(3-4 months), sharp(1 year), or extra sharp(2 years)
 
Jane Reed
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Location: Fair Play, Northern California
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Large fruits need to be cut into slices so there is more surface area exposed. Then the slices can be dried in to sun, as with the smaller fruits you mentioned. To dry whole fruit is possible, but you would have to do it in a slow oven or an electric dehydrator. Even then it's a crapshoot, as the outside would dry to inedible leatheriness by the time the inside had shed all its moisture.
 
Emily Wilson
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Location: Atherley, Ontario
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If you've had luck in your climate with grapes and berries, then apples shouldn't be too difficult. Decide whether you'd like to keep the peel on or not, then core the apple straight down, keeping it otherwise whole. Slice into rounds, I'd start off with fairly thin at first and then work up to thicker slices once you've had some success. Thread a clean stick or piece of doweling through you apple slices, spacing them out evenly. Hang in a sunny, dry spot and wait for the magic to happen. Many people like to sprinkle cinnamon on their apples before drying, this of course tastes nice but also hides the inevitable brown colour they become. Just keep a good amount of airflow and minimal moisture and they should be fine.
 
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Video of all the permaculture design course and appropriate technology course (about 177 hours)
https://permies.com/wiki/65386/paul-wheaton/digital-market/Video-PDC-ATC-hours-HD
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