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Do you bury compost/mulch/manure?  RSS feed

 
Nolan Robert
Posts: 59
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Do you guys bury your compost/mulch/manure when you are adding it to a plot, or do you just leave it on top?

I'm not sure whether to bury it, mix it in a little with a pitchfork, or just leave it on top of the soil.


 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1976
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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Compost and manure I usually mix in, mulch I leave on top.

I have sometimes had a big load of half-finished compost and buried it below a new garden plot with good results.

 
Michael Vormwald
Posts: 154
Location: Central New York - Finger Lakes - Zone 5
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I don't have livestock (with the exception of the rabbit litter in compost) so I don't use manure. I often top dress plants with finished compost, but it can be spread on top or mixed into the soil. More and more as I dip my toe into the realm of no till, I think I will merely be adding organic materials on top and let nature take it's course....just as it does in open fields and the forest floor.
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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I used to burry it or work it into the top foot of soil. Now I just spread a layer on top and let it soak in on its own time. If you are tilling your beds, I would spread a layer and till it in, then once the bed is ready for planting I would spread a second layer as a top dressing, after planting I then add a thick layer of mulch. I have become a firm believer in the No-Till method and do not turn over ground anymore. I do use a broad fork to loosen the soil and normally I spread a layer of compost before I go through with the broad fork, then spread a top dressing afterwards.
 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Manure goes in my compost bin unless it's very well aged.
I pull old mulch off the bed, spread compost on top of the soil and throw the mulch back on, topping it up if needed.
 
Michael Vormwald
Posts: 154
Location: Central New York - Finger Lakes - Zone 5
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I'm heading in the direction of no till, reserving the tiller for any new rock hard ground earthworks. I've wondered (and thinking out loud) about using a broad fork, but I wonder if this too upsets fungi threads and may be counter productive. I think with enough cover, given time, you might be able to plant with little/no soil disturbance ... time will tell!

Bryant RedHawk wrote:I used to burry it or work it into the top foot of soil. Now I just spread a layer on top and let it soak in on its own time. If you are tilling your beds, I would spread a layer and till it in, then once the bed is ready for planting I would spread a second layer as a top dressing, after planting I then add a thick layer of mulch. I have become a firm believer in the No-Till method and do not turn over ground anymore. I do use a broad fork to loosen the soil and normally I spread a layer of compost before I go through with the broad fork, then spread a top dressing afterwards.
 
Amos Burkey
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Location: Nebraska
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When I use aged manure, I leave it on top. Then I mulch over the top of that. I have relegated the tiller to only use when breaking open an area that is too hard to loosen by hand. I no longer favor turning the soil.

Grow it if you have it!
 
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