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Muscovy Duck Question

 
ilanna greenfield
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Howdy,
We have 6 week old muscovy ducks that I've noticed have yellowish-brown raised spots on the top of their webbing and a little on their bills.. It looks to be some biological growth as I've tried to scrub it off. Any ideas of what this could be??
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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Could be fungal...could be parasitic...could be gene defect characteristic in creatine generator...

Need photos to know more and probably microscopy...

Lets see what others share...

j
 
ilanna greenfield
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Here's a few pics-
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Jay C. White Cloud
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Hmmm...from the photo that looks like "compression ecchymosis" (bruising) from a fellow Muscovy in the enclosure with them...not a fungus or parasite. Its shape matches the hook on their bill. Do you observe any "nipping" with each other. Is the animal in the photo a "lesser ranked" member of the group?
 
ilanna greenfield
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No actually, that's my largest male. I've observed them and it doesn't seem that they're aggressive towards each other at all... They have a large space and seem quite content.. I've raised kahki's in the same conditions with no problems. I've searched online quite a bit and haven't come up with anything.. Very strange.
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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We will have to wait and see what happens...usually with a disease vector of any type you would see some spreading or additional blemishes. At this time I am going with IUO (injury of unknown orgin) as only more time will tell.
 
ilanna greenfield
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Perhaps evenings they get spunky.. I'll keep a close eye on it. Most of the ducks (7 of them) have this in their feet and a couple on the bills.
Thanks you for the input!
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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My pleasure...most likely nocturnal nipping and scratching...and not of great concern
 
ilanna greenfield
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Jay,
Just wanted to drop a line and thank you so much for the responses. Most definitely was simply getting used to their environment and everyone is spot free now. They are the happiest mellow birds we have!
Take care, -ilanna
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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Hi,

Thanks for the update!

I have found Muscovy, over the decades, to be some of the most enchanting domestic birds I have ever had the company of. If given what little they need, they present as very intelligent (relatively speaking,) responsive, and often very interactive...seeking out your company and physical contact. Many have asked me in the past about "pet ducks" and I have always recommend Muscovy.

They give so much on a permie-farm...to the point that if I have them, rabbits, sheep/goat, and Indian Runners...the rest is just a "want to have breed" not a need to have.

Good luck, and enjoy you animals and what the offer.

j
 
Natasha Turner
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Location: Kentucky knob region
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I second that thought. I love my Muscovies. I don't think I'll ever want to be without them. Mine are sweet, quiet, endearing. The girl is prettier than the guy, but he can be a sweety when he is pining for his broody girl. He'll seek out company. Mama is sitting on my doorstep right now, curious about what I'm up to and probably hoping for a treat or some fresh cool water from the faucet
 
Bob Blackmer
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Location: East Greenwich, Rhode Island
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Natasha, Any babies yet?
 
Natasha Turner
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Location: Kentucky knob region
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Hey Bob, I am soooo upset. They all died! 11 were unformed (one of those was just a little mass of veins). The day before we were expecting them, I was out in the garden, and an egg exploded all over the other eggs. I ran online to see what to do, and all I was seeing said to clean out the nest and wipe down the remaining eggs (so they wouldn't be contaminated with the bad bacteria). The kids and I did, but that evening she only sat on the eggs for five minutes. We went through a bunch of hoops trying to save them, but on day 37 I gently peeled back a shell and found the perfectly formed duckling dead. I went through the last five and found the same It was a great loss to me
 
Jay C. White Cloud
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Sorry Natasha,

This often happens with first timers (and old as well) that is why I recommend that all clutches be "doubled" and then at the same time you have at least one successful clutch to carry on your plans...Some fowl just are not good "brooder" but great mothers and will raise the young for you...while others are poor mothers but great brooders...

Hope you keep trying...

j
 
Connie White
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I raise Muscovy - but mine are for eating mosquitoes and for meat! They are delicious and not fatty. The males will fight big time - I've had something akin to a murder scene on my deck before as they will pull at each other's heads til they bleed. Once the males reach puberty - I'd suggest culling and smoking - oh on a bed of spring lettuce with goat cheese and pecans - nothing taste finer!

Also - on the ducklings- they take at least 35 - 37 days to hatch and it's difficult to really tell when it begins. So, yours *could* have still been a day or two away from hatching. My gals slowly go broody. By that, I mean that one day, they'll be on the clutch a little while, this will last a few days. It takes almost a week before they are totally dedicating their time to sitting. Also - make sure the momma has some water to splash around in. Most eggs will not hatch in an incubator because people cannot get the humidity right. I have always observed my gals taking more baths right before they hatch out. I've never had any issue with the first clutch from a new mom. Water - a small pool is a must - from my experience.

Also - it was a double edge sword, but when you wiped those eggs off, you removed the protective layer which keeps bacteria out. It may have been best to leave them alone because removing that clear protective later opens the egg up to everything! Even washing chicken eggs is bad - as it reduces the fridge life of the egg. This is one of the finest articles I've read to date on eggs - I learned a LOT http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/how-to-store-fresh-eggs-zmaz77ndzgoe.aspx?PageId=1#ArticleContent

Right now - I've had issues with the momma's having food and water separate from the rest of the fowl as I free range everyone. Also = I have mine pair up with cochins who successfully hatch out my muscovy and blue swedish meat ducks. I have over 100 fowl running around now so too many lay eggs alongside the ducks and just mess everything up! My gals and their eggs are penned up now but later, I will have them small pools...which will have to be removed after they are hatched. I have ponds too. So - after the ducklings are a bit bigger, I let them all go and have momma take care of them. I do lose a few, but it's the trade off. I want them to forage for food as best they can. I let mine lose too - they always fly back and when they go broody - they stay around the house. Having said that - one of my neighbors has 7 from a hatching that don't want to come back. They have a stocked fish pond with a feeder! but the momma came back and is now on her 3rd clutch in the barn!

I hope this information helps - I do love the Muscovy!

Connie
 
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The stocking stuffer game for all your Permaculture companions
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