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Tree ID

 
chris mcgrath
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This is growing aggressively from runners along the tree line.

Maybe some kind of ash?

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Bryant RedHawk
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That could also be a Walnut tree. the Ash family has opposing paired branches, the Walnut family has alternating branches. It definitely isn't a Hickory.
 
leila hamaya
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i agree with bryant, it looks like one of the walnut family of trees- Juglans.

not sure which one, or if it is for certain, but thats the same kind of leaves walnut trees have.
 
Cam Mitchell
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Location: W. CO, 6A
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Ah, I had those growing at my last place. Can't remember what they were. Lots of offset seeds with a wing: they "helicopter" when they fall.
Have to ask if anyone remembers what it was...
 
Jessica Padgham
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Location: Denver, Co 6000ft bentonite clay soil
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Growing from runners says sumac to me. Also your second picture has what looks like the flower bunches that will turn into the tell-tale berries.
 
leila hamaya
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o yeah,
i bet thats right. sumac.

its not quite exactly like walnut, but close.
 
chris mcgrath
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Thanks for all the responses. The trees are in Eastern West Virginia if that helps. The leaves seem to grow only on the very ends of branches. The bark looks grey to me. They are growing in a hedge row along with Oak and Cherry. Should I keep them away from the other trees?
 
wayne stephen
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Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
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I agree with Jessica . Sumac .
 
Jamie Wallace
Posts: 82
Location: Lantzville, Vancouver Island,BC Cool temperate, Lat. 49.245 Zone 8a
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Definitely Rhus thypina or Sumac
Wikipedia-Sumac
 
Alder Burns
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Location: northern California
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This looks like Ailanthus to me. Sumacs don't have winged seeds that blow around, they have berries, some smooth and some furry. Ailanthus can also get taller than any sumac, almost as tall as the general canopy of trees in the background. The leaves also have a peculiar unique funky smell, again unlike any sumac, whose leaves have not much smell, or walnut, with a not unpleasant kind of solvent smell.....
Ailanthus is considered an "invasive exotic" in many places where it grows, but it has the ability to survive where many plants cannot, and might be a valuable pioneer on degraded sites. Supposedly it can grow in straight coal ash or mine spoil, and the book "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" is named after it, where it comes up in cracks through the pavement..... I'm not aware of any practical uses. Most animals won't touch it, and the wood is light and not much worth burning....
 
Julia Franke
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Location: Berks County, PA
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My vote is for Sumac. If it gets red berries on the top later in your year, that is your plant. I have oodles on my property. Later this year, you will find out (if you get those red berries)
 
glenn thomas
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alder burns is correct
Ailanthus altissima Tree of Heaven
 
Merideth Richardson
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Ah!
Eww!
Tree of heaven. I agree with burns. Ailanthus altissima. Tree of #$%& is more like it....
 
wayne stephen
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Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
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In the second photo above are those berry clusters forming ? Look dead center of the photo . Red and conical like a sumac perhaps ? Or new leaf buds ?
 
Wynn Ho
Posts: 19
Location: an hour south of Atlanta, Georgia
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3hxhStqc-3M&index=150&list=WL
video on how to use sumac spice
 
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