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Moths and other pollinators  RSS feed

 
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The other day I found a luna moth and was amazed

Moths and many other insects such as flys, beetles, and beetles are important pollinators.
The four o'clock flower and the yucca plant rely on moths for their pollination. Information about other pollinators: Pollination syndrome

Woot! just found out I could edit my posts. BTW I believe that the topic of alternative polinators (and attracting them) is so important that it deserves it's own topic.
 
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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A luna moth I found in first grade made the biggest impression on me for the longest time. I still love seeing them. I think this is a great idea
....Here is a picture of my echinacea from last summer with an unidentified butterfly that is after nectar I know, although I thought they did a bit of accidental pollinating as they go. Are you good with ID's? This may be one of the fritillaries, not sure which one.
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Daniel Kern
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I'm not good with butterfly identification, but I am good with google. After about 20min i think i found it. looks like a buckeye (Junonia coenia) to me.
Junonia coenia

BTW great picture. beautiful. I just planted a 5 pound bag of Echinacea, so I can't wait for that to come up. hopefully I will see some buckeyes also
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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I thought this was the same 'buckeye' butterfly from last years picture at first....but this year the 'painted lady' is posing on my echinacea

your thread has me reading up a bit and apparently .... "Though butterflies may not be premiere pollinators, their continual flitting from flower to flower more than makes up for the quantity of pollen they carry." quoted from this SITE

I thought that bats were pollinators in some areas...don't know about ours, thought, the little brown bat.

We used to see the large brownish Sphinx moth on the ground more often...I don't know what they or the luna moth feed on at night
echinacea-010.jpg
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one of the 'thistle butterflies' painted lady
 
Daniel Kern
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You really have a talent for taking a picture of those butterflies. While searching for that buckeye i found this website and was amazed at all the truly beautiful butterflies and moths http://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/gallery

One thing that I thought was especially interesting is that they have a program to get involved as a citizen scientist identifying and reporting regional information about butterflies and moths.
 
Daniel Kern
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I just uploaded my first picture to butterflies and moths website. It's really cool. They log your sighting, and identify the butterfly for you. It turns out that the butterfly that I found was a Spicebush Swallowtail. Another stunning butterfly.

Papilio troilus

 
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