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red chanterelles...cantharellus cinnabarinus

 
Posts: 7649
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Looks like this is our mushroom of the week here....we love the much larger summer orange chanterelles for eating, but have never had enough of these small red chanterelles to be worth gathering until this year. Anybody else finding them? How are you preparing them?

These and the orange ones are so much fun to spot in the woods...I think my eyesight isn't up to morels anymore

I notice in my photos they don't look as deep, deep orange as in reality...I think the ones on the edges of some of the pics are truer to color.
fungi-010.jpg
our mushroom of the week
red chanterelles...cantharellus cinnabarinus
fungi-002.jpg
red chanterelles
red chanterelles...cantharellus cinnabarinus
fungi-007.jpg
cantharellus cinnabarinus
red chanterelles...cantharellus cinnabarinus
 
Posts: 103
Location: Zone 5, Maine Coast
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I love the lesser chanterelles when they show up! We get the yellow footed here in the fall. I think the smaller ones tend to have fewer arthropods inside them, and they are easier to clean and prep for cooking.
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Dan Tutor wrote:I love the lesser chanterelles when they show up! We get the yellow footed here in the fall. I think the smaller ones tend to have fewer arthropods inside them, and they are easier to clean and prep for cooking.




We've noticed that also...if we are a bit late finding the smooth chanterelles the stem is riddled with vertical tunnels...haven't really tried to ID what does that. I usually am hungry enough for a good mushroom, though, that i will cut around all of that, lots of times the cap will be in better shape.
i'm looking forward to cooking some of these little red ones whole.
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 7649
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Breakfast (or at least the first course)......30 minutes from picking the mushrooms and lambsquarters, cleaning and cooking, to our plates....with a little olive oil and salt

I just really love that color.
fungi-016.jpg
30 minutes from picking the mushrooms and lambsquarters, cleaning and cooking, to our plates
red chanterelles...cantharellus cinnabarinus
fungi-017.jpg
I just really love that color
red chanterelles...cantharellus cinnabarinus
fungi-018.jpg
Breakfast (or at least the first course)
red chanterelles...cantharellus cinnabarinus
 
Posts: 127
Location: Orgyen, zone 8
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Wow, awesome photos Judith! The red chanterelle is not found here in Oregon, so it's really interesting for me (the chanterelle fanatic) to see what those guys look like.
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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A spore print of a red chanterelle....peterson's field guide says 'pinkish' this maybe 'pinkish yellow' ? the actual print looks 'pinkish'....my photo looks more yellow.
spore-print-001.jpg
my photo looks more yellow
red chanterelles...cantharellus cinnabarinus spore print
 
Dan Tutor
Posts: 103
Location: Zone 5, Maine Coast
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Judith Browning wrote:Breakfast (or at least the first course)......30 minutes from picking the mushrooms and lambsquarters, cleaning and cooking, to our plates....with a little olive oil and salt

I just really love that color.



Gorgeous!
 
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Location: North Mississippi
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i found a lot more of these than usual also, we got a LOT of rain for about a week or ten days straight that may have something to do with it
 
Posts: 296
Location: Carbon Hill, AL
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The Chantrelles have started to pop up here too.
Walker county, alabama. All the rain and heat we are going to get next week will have them all out in full bloom.

I picked a few handfuls of quarter sized ones this afternoon to cook up with dinner.
My honey hole looks like someone threw a bag of orange popcorn all over the ground there are so many just beginning to pop up out of the soil.
 
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They look so pretty! Wish I got to try them once... Mushrooms are wonderful. One time I thought I found plenty of chanterelles, figured out they were false chanterelles (Hygrophoropsis aurantiaca) once I made soup out of them.
 
Posts: 9
Location: Near Baltimore, MD.
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Are these also Red Chantarelles? They look just like the ones posted earlier in the thread.
20180825_082100677173892757914385.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 20180825_082100677173892757914385.jpeg]
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[Thumbnail for 20180825_0821111641360926820182477.jpeg]
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[Thumbnail for 20181012_1734048653780205871220879.jpeg]
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Rachel Stark wrote:Are these also Red Chantarelles? They look just like the ones posted earlier in the thread.



Without a spore print and a good look at the underside to be sure that they have'false gills' and are decurrent I wouldn't say for sure.  

What time of year were they found? and what part of the world? Were they growing on wood?





 
Judith Browning
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here's a couple links that have identifying characteristics for chanterelles and also 'look a likes' to be aware of.

Identification of Chanterelle Mushrooms

The Cinnabar Red Chanterelle, Cantharellus cinnabarinus
 
pollinator
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Location: Toronto, Ontario
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Identification is crucial. I just want to voice that again.

Now that that's out of the way, I knew chanterelles in Eastern Ontario at the cottage when I was a toddler. They'd grow under the jack pines and we'd have them in our omelets. I wasn't too fond of eggs at that point, so while I ate them, they weren't what I'd call a favourite.

It turns out we were doing it wrong the whole while.

The oils that hold the flavour compounds in chanterelles are fat-soluble, meaning that if you want to unpack all that taste, a bath in fat is what you want. I adapted an amazing wild mushroom soup to feature chanterelles and a supporting cast of cremini mushrooms, and to include a room-temperature soak of the chanterelles, covered, in the cream for the soup over six hours. The cream was orange afterwards, with little blobs of essential chanterelle oils floating atop it. If you ever make chanterelles into anything ever again, I suggest in the strongest terms possible that such a cream or butter extraction be done, even quickly, at lowest heat in a saucepan, with butter, cream, or any other fat, really; coconut cream or oil might even work, though I would need to try it out in a vegan recipe context to see how I would make it work without the coconut overpowering the chanterelle.

I have never tried the Cinnabar Red Chanterelle, though. Is there anyone who is familiar with both that could characterise the differences between them for me?

-CK
 
Rachel Stark
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Location: Near Baltimore, MD.
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Judith Browning wrote:

Rachel Stark wrote:Are these also Red Chantarelles? They look just like the ones posted earlier in the thread.



Without a spore print and a good look at the underside to be sure that they have'false gills' and are decurrent I wouldn't say for sure.  

What time of year were they found? and what part of the world? Were they growing on wood?



I'll be sure to get a spore print and take a sample next time I see them! I do have a picture where a small one has fallen over, and it looks like false gills. They were so tiny I didn't want to disturb them.

They came up August through October in coastal MD in the United States in 2018, when we were getting about twice the normal rainfall, growing out of a wet patch of fallen leaves and decomposing leaves and twigs. The trees in the area are a oak and pine forest, with wild blueberry underbrush. There were a lot of mushrooms coming up, but these were one of the brighter colored ones. I think they're new to the area, since I haven't seen them here before. That particular area where I found it always seems to have an abundance of fungi and lichens.

Looking at the identification article.... the picture of the young cinnabar chantarelles does look almost identical. I'll be on the lookout for a mushroom identification expert. Is it possible to cultivate them?
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Rachel, It's sounding more and more like you've got a good ID!
I don't know about cultivating them though...you might check at Paul Stamet's site 'Fungi Perfecti' https://fungi.com/ .

Chris, I've eaten both but not side by side.  I think the flavor difference is subtle and for me might have only had to do with the color, many times visuals affect my taste buds.
It's been awhile since I've eaten any as we don't live on that forty acres anymore where we would find them.  
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