• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

HELP PLEASE! Long time farmer new electro fencer - goats, chickens!

 
Corina Graves
Posts: 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey y'all it's my first permies post! I have embarked on the wonderful journey of turning my family (horse) farm into a closed loop perm farm. Things are going great! Happy horses plants chickens n goats... Well maybe my goats are a little TOO spry thus my dilemma.
I was really trying to stay away from electric fence, but I just don't see another viable option anymore since my goats seem to wait until I'm out to run errands to go exploring, not giving a damn what my border collie has to say about it. SO what to use what to use? Lemme give you what I'm working with.
*20 acres
*3 in boxwood
3 in mature woods
2 goats now- hoping to get up to 4ish
30 chickens

My other half and I have been busting our asses stinging runs for the goats put of field wire every 4 days or so and it's just not viable, I'm worried about the coveted ecletronet fencing since as I mentioned I'm dealing with HEAVY ground and brush cover. I'd really prefer a solar charger.... And alive to a long time farm girl but first to electric fence owner would be SO appreciated
Thanks,
Corina creeature
 
Ann Torrence
steward
Pie
Posts: 1188
Location: Torrey, UT; 6,840'/2085m; 7.5" precip; 125 frost-free days
110
bee books chicken duck goat trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Welcome to Permies!

We've been using Premier 1 fencing for about a year. Our local dairy goat farmer strongly recommended them. Started the goats as 3 month old kids, they respect it after three zaps. The chickens aren't much of a challenge. The geese are figuring it out now. The fussiest part is folding it up carefully when you move it. That's what damages it. Last time we used a wagon to layer it on like an accordion which worked ok. We have 2 controllers, one on AC and the other on a car battery we charge at night when the goats are in their pen. Someday, solar, but funds haven't been allocated to that yet.

This video helped a lot. The instructions are a lot scarier than the video.


Edited to make the vid work
 
Mike Cornwell
Posts: 24
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We went with Kencove's net fencing ourselves and a solar setup. It really wasn't expensive, except for the battery. I bought like a 250+ amp hour battery, which is probably way overkill for our fence, but I tell you what it could run it for like a month with no sun.

I put our baby kids out in the fenced area at 1-2 weeks old. The fence wasn't screaming hot, probably around 5k, and when the little guys would come over to nibble on the fence, they got it. I'll never have issues again. My mama goats could careless. But I'll state up front that I have boer goats rather than dairy goats like Nigerians. From what I've seen, read and heard, they seem QUITE a bit more of a pain in the ass to fence and are much more energetic. I seem to imagine them being like my 3 week - 5 week old kids, except always. The two mama goats just lay in the sun all day.

The big thing regarding electric fencing is definitely the grounding. We had a period or two in the last 6 months where we didn't get any rain for a month, and you could REALLY tell the difference in the amount of conductiveness in the soil, not to mention the ground (we have clay) was so unbelievably difficult to get the stakes in the ground, i had to jump up and down as hard as I could (as a 160 pound male).
 
Andrea Dickerson
Posts: 1
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We rotationally graze our goats using Premier 1 electronet (poultry kind) for the does/kids, and a cattle panel setup for the bucks. If the area you are trying to graze is very brushy, you'd probably go crazy with the electronet (it would get tangled on everything, and you may not be able to get a good charge). A cattle panel setup would probably work pretty well though if the ground is somewhat level, or if there is a tree you can secure one side to. Ours is just 4 cattle panels (16ft x 52") hooked together into a square.. well more of a circle really as they are bent in the middle for better stability and to increase the area of the pen. We use three snap clips per side to hook them together, like what you'd find on the end of a horse lead but without the rope. We do attach one side to a permanent fence, so the buck's pen basically travels around the edge of a large horse pasture fenced by woven wire. I haven't tried the pen free standing, but this blog shows some neat support braces to make it that way. Seems to work for them even with nubians!

http://www.culturedhome.com/2010/05/18/rotational-mob-grazing-elimintes-buttercup/
 
Corina Graves
Posts: 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mike Cornwell wrote:We went with Kencove's net fencing ourselves and a solar setup. It really wasn't expensive, except for the battery. I bought like a 250+ amp hour battery, which is probably way overkill for our fence, but I tell you what it could run it for like a month with no sun.

I put our baby kids out in the fenced area at 1-2 weeks old. The fence wasn't screaming hot, probably around 5k, and when the little guys would come over to nibble on the fence, they got it. I'll never have issues again. My mama goats could careless. But I'll state up front that I have boer goats rather than dairy goats like Nigerians. From what I've seen, read and heard, they seem QUITE a bit more of a pain in the ass to fence and are much more energetic. I seem to imagine them being like my 3 week - 5 week old kids, except always. The two mama goats just lay in the sun all day.

The big thing regarding electric fencing is definitely the grounding. We had a period or two in the last 6 months where we didn't get any rain for a month, and you could REALLY tell the difference in the amount of conductiveness in the soil, not to mention the ground (we have clay) was so unbelievably difficult to get the stakes in the ground, i had to jump up and down as hard as I could (as a 160 pound male).

Thanks for the advice everyone!I ended up going with the kencove bc of their spheal on pos/neg net for shitty terrain. Boxes arrived last night, setting up in a min! Heres to my goating success!
thanks alot yall
c
 
joseph wittenberg
Posts: 57
Location: aguanga, california
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I second the grounding advice. When we set up our electric fencing at first couldn't get the tester to show a reading over 2000. I had some loose rebar around and made 3 more rods in a circuit and now the tester goes over 8000. We love in a really dry desert area though with little moisture in the soil. Good luck!
 
Mike Cornwell
Posts: 24
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I need to do the same thing.

I have considered doing a blog post, or mini ebook on electric fencing, and one thing I'm NOT going to recommend is some of kencove's boilerplate recommendations. In general they definitely helped me out, but using the single pushin grounding rod they gave me, has not been the best way to do things, even though I wish that it would.

I have definitely hit 9-10k from my energizer and single grounding rod. I've been shocked so hard by that fence that I almost was thrown to the ground. But lately I'm getting 3-4k at best, and I think its generally because of grounding issues (and too much stuff touching the fence). That I think may be one of the major issues with using netting, over step in posts with tape/ropes.
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic