Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

Muscovy duck..surprise!

 
Posts: 51
Location: Finland
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well yesterday we got two Muscovy ducks, slightly earlier than expected, we were to get them in end of May but the guy arrived with them yesterday!
So a few quick questions, I have to ask here as the guy was German and he doesnt speak English or Finnish! and I dont speak German.
From what I could understand he says not to feed them whole grain, but to grind it init a flour. Is this right?
Today they had chicken mash and mashed potatoes.
So any advice from duck people is gratefully recieved!
Thankyou.
suomi.
 
pollinator
Posts: 425
15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
they need a high protein mash to start with, like 18% or higher, but then you must cut down to around 14% after 2 weeks so that they can develop their wings properly, higher protein can cause what is known as "angel wing".

when young they need fine food they can swallow, but they also need grit in the food (which the mash should have)

you could also add sour raw milk to the mash, i added water and goats milk to my duck's mash

but when they come of size and can take whole grain, feeding whole soaked grains (for 24 hours or longer) is better, less messy and keeps them warmer in the winter.
 
suomi--Nicola Lloyd
Posts: 51
Location: Finland
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks
they are actually full grown, we were supposed to be getting young ones in may,but I guess something got lost in translation!!  but anyway they are here now, so I will soak grain, we have barley and oats.  Great if that keeps them warm in winter cos it gets to minus 25o centigrade!
suomi 
 
suomi--Nicola Lloyd
Posts: 51
Location: Finland
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
ah one more quick question.... is it ok for the ducks to be in the same run as chickens, its a huge area mostly silver birch trees and grass, the ducks would have their own seperate house.
Thanks, suomi
 
Emil Spoerri
pollinator
Posts: 425
15
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
shouldn't be a problem, though the ducks may much up the chickens water, which is annoying
and the chickens may steal food that you intended for the ducks...
 
That feels good. Thanks. Here's a tiny ad:
Heat your home with the twigs that naturally fall of the trees in your yard
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!