• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

coopering...making wooden buckets

 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 19
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I spent some time in my husband's cooper shop attempting a bit of a photo documentation of his work, the tools used and some history of bucket coopering. He apprenticed locally with a student of Alex Stewart's fifteen years ago. Alex Stewart was interviewed in the third Foxfire book. My husbands teacher taught at the John C. Campbell folk school for several years.
Printed text and coopered items all credited to my husband unless noted otherwise.

Please ask questions if you have any....If he does any coopering this year I'll add some pictures of the process. He's been busy making pitchforks and carving spoons and bowls so far.

I'll be posting pictures of coopered vessels and the tools used to make them along with other bucket cooper shop work including spoons and bowls.



and a link to his work MAKING WOODEN PITCHFORKS
coopershop 148.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 148.jpg]
coopershop 144.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 144.jpg]
coopershop 147.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 147.jpg]
coopershop 076.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 076.jpg]
cedar bucket with white oak hoops and hemp rope handle
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 6
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is a great video of Alex Stewart who taught my husband's teacher..........check out the bib overalls
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTb2zVpQGg4&feature=player_detailpage





hemp rope handled cedar water bucket....water tight once water swells the wood....cattail fluff is used to seal the bottom.
coopershop 008.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 008.jpg]
coopershop 006.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 006.jpg]
hoop join
coopershop 059.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 059.jpg]
detail of handle
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
these pictures are an example of how the staves are shaped to fit together. In this small example, ones fingers are used for the 'key stone' to hold the gap while the last stave is put in place..then the hoops are knocked down tightly to hold the staves in place until wooden hoops are added.
coopershop 096.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 096.jpg]
coopershop 098.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 098.jpg]
coopershop 100.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 100.jpg]
coopershop 102.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 102.jpg]
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
PIGGINS!.......a small bucket with one stave extended as the handle.

These are made from local eastern red cedar, split from the log...both the staves and head (bottom) are red cedar.

The white oak hoops are split from carefully selected white oak growing out back on our land.

The bottom is sealed with cattail fluff!
coopershop 002.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 002.jpg]
cedar piggin
coopershop 009.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 009.jpg]
white oak hoop join on piggin
coopershop 010.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 010.jpg]
inside cedar piggin
coopershop 017.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 017.jpg]
another smaller piggin with lock and key hoop join
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
a small washtub....

coopershop 089.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 089.jpg]
coopershop 091.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 091.jpg]
coopershop 092.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 092.jpg]
inside
coopershop 093.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 093.jpg]
head (bottom)
coopershop 012.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 012.jpg]
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
tools....my pictures overlap so there are some repeats...I wanted to give a picture of the wall from left to right. His shop at home is nowhere near so neat These are all of his woodworking tools ...not just the ones used for coopering.
coopershop 036.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 036.jpg]
coopershop 035.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 035.jpg]
coopershop 034.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 034.jpg]
coopershop 033.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 033.jpg]
 
Gary Lewis
Posts: 132
Location: Maine, USA
5
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow - these are beautiful. Pieces of art! Thanks for sharing.

Gaz
www.almostafarmer.com
 
Jerry Ward
Posts: 188
Location: S.E. Michigan - Zone 6a
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Can you provide some detail on the white oak bands? How are they formed and what keeps them tight?

Thanks,
Jerry

P.S. This is a skill I would love to learn, but too many other demands on my time.
 
cate white
Posts: 3
1
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is outstanding to see. Thanks so much for posting. I always wondered what the surname 'Cooper' meant too.
 
Scott Stiller
Posts: 280
Location: North Carolina zone 7
3
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is hardcore awesome. Real craftsmanship in a functional product. Thanks for posting.
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks, everyone...I am enjoying this also!


Jerry Ward wrote:Can you provide some detail on the white oak bands? How are they formed and what keeps them tight?

Thanks,
Jerry

P.S. This is a skill I would love to learn, but too many other demands on my time.


Jerry, I'll be posting an answer soon...


....a couple more pictures. This is a lidded table ware bowl with spoon....used for sugar, mustard, honey...condiments for the table.
coopershop 042.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 042.jpg]
coopershop 044.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 044.jpg]
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Jerry Ward wrote:Can you provide some detail on the white oak bands? How are they formed and what keeps them tight?


...the answer from S.

"The hoops are made with the same basic green-woodworking (of white oak) technology as the pitchforks and myriad other household objects-splitting, hewing, shaving, scraping,etc.
The goal of all coopering is to make conical arches of tapered and radially beveled staves, held tightly together by unstretchable hoops driven down on the cone.
The hoop and the taper are usually judged so friction alone will hold the hoop in place, but then they are often nailed or pegged in place anyway. I use walnut pegs. What keeps the hoop tight, ultimately, is maintenance...the hoops can always be driven up tighter, or replaced with slightly smaller ones. The nails or pegs have to be pulled and replaced, of course."


In my first post I've linked to the pitchfork thread that pictures most of the 'green woodworking techniques' mentioned above.

One thing that I notice he doesn't mention in this answer is that the hoops are completed and joined into a circle of the correct diameter and THEN driven on to the cone.

feel free to ask more questions....








 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
......two more buckets with different handles. The bucket in the first two was done by another student of my husbands teacher. Both have 'lock and key' type join for the hoop.
My pictures distort the handles...the extended stave and handle are of equal size on each side of the buckets.


this is an EDIT........i had attributed the buckets in reverse.
coopershop 072.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 072.jpg]
this bucket done by another student
coopershop 075.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 075.jpg]
this bucket done by another student
coopershop 080.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 080.jpg]
coopershop 081.jpg
[Thumbnail for coopershop 081.jpg]
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
...and they hold water
bucket with water 007.jpg
[Thumbnail for bucket with water 007.jpg]
 
Christian Wolff
Posts: 13
Location: Colorado/Montana
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Those pics are gorgeous.
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is a skill I would love to learn


....and it is still being taught

As many homesteaders know, learning a craft can add satisfaction to one's life while adding diversity to one's income stream. I think woodworking, using hand tools especially, fits well into a permaculture plan. I'm hoping to help inspire others to explore traditional craft both by this topic and the 'making wooden pitchforks' thread. Some skills, like coopering, really need a hands on teacher...others maybe just practice and books and web info.
good luck!

EDIT: all of the above photos are taken at the Cooper Shop at the Ozark Folk Center except for the one of the piggin full of water.
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Pie
Posts: 1831
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
122
chicken dog forest garden hugelkultur hunting toxin-ectomy
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Very nice Work! I've always loved the look, feel and artistry of wood implements. I was fortunate to be born into a family that owned a cooperage. My first bed side lamp was made from a practice barrel I made. I love the craft and now do all the steps with nothing but hand tools, just like I was taught as a child. The Cooperage now has of course mechanized for practical reasons and to keep the profit margin up. I'm trying to get to the point where I can take Wolf, my wife up to Mountain Home for a day trip.
 
Cali McAffrey
Posts: 7
Location: Central Texas
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Absolutely gorgeous.
 
Toni Tanskanen
Posts: 1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Is there good books about making wooden buckets? Or instructions or videos in some webpage?

After some googling I found this:
http://www.beaverbuckets.com/catalog/bookdvd/

Does anyone has experience how good that book is?



 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Toni Tanskanen wrote:Is there good books about making wooden buckets? Or instructions or videos in some webpage?

After some googling I found this:
http://www.beaverbuckets.com/catalog/bookdvd/

Does anyone has experience how good that book is?





Hi, Toni....sorry i am so slow getting back to this.......It looks like you found the cooper that my husband was going to recommend He thinks that Jim Gaster is an excellent cooper. I haven't looked at the site...are there videos also? Although my husband learned as an apprentice...he says he would still like to get a copy of that book one day.

... welcome to permies! ...and thanks for posting.
 
John Devitt
Posts: 34
Location: Belfair WA
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What other material can be used for the hoops?

Here in the PNW I have lots of cedar, but not much Oak. I have Fir, Hemlock, Maple and Alder.

thanks in advance.
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
John Devitt wrote:What other material can be used for the hoops?

Here in the PNW I have lots of cedar, but not much Oak. I have Fir, Hemlock, Maple and Alder.

thanks in advance.


he says "I don't know the woods out there that well, but I suspect Big Leaf Maple is the rough equivalent. It is the very nature of this traditional green woodworking technology to be very local, to accumulate knowledge of the potential uses of the trees in ones own area.
From here (arkansas ozarks) EASTwards, I have heard of oak, hickory, ash and elm being used for hoops and willow and hazel for lighter use."


I can speak from observation of the frustration after cutting and splitting even a perfectly straight grained white oak and finding that it cracks and will not bend into hoops well. Both my husband and our white oak split basket maker friend are noticing this (maybe) more often lately....what is called "brash"...wood that is brittle, less limber than needed for the work that they do. Let us know what you try and how it works.

 
paul wheaton
master steward
Pie
Posts: 19863
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
this book/dvd tells how to make wooden buckets in the tradition of those I have pictured in this thread..........no power tools or glue needed....
I think, Jim G. uses a silicone in the joints of the bucket, which of course, isn't traditional, but is one of the down sides, I think, to trying to mass produce an item for the public. The buckets pictured in this thread have been carefully fitted so that when filled with a liquid the wood swells and holds tight without the help of a glue or silicone (although cattail fluff is sometimes used to seal the bucket bottom).....it can be done


http://www.beaverbuckets.com/

BB_DVD_Cover.jpg
[Thumbnail for BB_DVD_Cover.jpg]
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
...and here is Roy Underhill.............a short bit from one of his PBS shows on bucket coopering.

he also works in the tradition of the coopered buckets pictured in this thread ......people see my husband in his shop with all of his hand tools and his hat and suspenders and say he looks like Roy.....Roy is not aging, though



it is not the whole show, unfortunately, but a good peek at some fine coopered buckets.
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
a very short peek at the cooper shop at Williamsburg.....

 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
and another............she is wonderful! this a much longer video and covers much of the processes and tools.



and a link to a podcast interview with Ramona.

http://podcast.history.org/2012/01/02/meet-the-cooper/
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
working with cedar...


 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is a great video of Alex Stewart who taught my husband's teacher..........check out the bib overalls
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTb2zVpQGg4&feature=player_detailpage


 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Alex Stewart "Portrait of a Pioneer"
Portrait of a Pioneer at Amazon

 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well, my husband is coopering this month but I haven't made it in to town to take some pictures of him working, so I sent the camera with him yesterday.........here are a few shots of staves in the works.......all photos taken at the Cooper Shop at the Ozark Folk Center.
IMG_1682.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1682.JPG]
CHURN stave and rough split that it is from
IMG_1681.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1681.JPG]
(either side of saw) stack of rough splits and stack of CHURN staves drawknifed from them
IMG_1680.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1680.JPG]
a rough split marked for cutting and shaving
IMG_1679.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1679.JPG]
the CHURN stave (and scrap) from the previous rough split
IMG_1678.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1678.JPG]
two days work: CHURN staves and bucket staves made from quartered cedar logs comparable to walnut ones shown
 
Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
88
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Wow, fresh cedar is an amazing colour!
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5555
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
262
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
More on coopering in the 'book' forum The Cooper and his Trade by Kenneth Kilby
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Pie
Posts: 1831
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
122
chicken dog forest garden hugelkultur hunting toxin-ectomy
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
John Devitt wrote:What other material can be used for the hoops?

Here in the PNW I have lots of cedar, but not much Oak. I have Fir, Hemlock, Maple and Alder.

thanks in advance.


I would use the maple trees for hoops in your neck of the woods. work them green and they will be easier to form.

Alder would do nicely for the staves for making buckets and tubs and even dry barrels.

The cedars of the PNW are traditional for making the old style "hot tubs" Staves.
 
Mike Patterson
Posts: 37
Location: nemo, 5a/b
9
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you, Judith, for all this great information and wonderful pictures!

I'm trying to track down a curved drawknife and am having somewhat of a hard time finding a good source. Would your husband (or anyone else) have any recommendations for where to buy one or a good manufacturer to look out for? I don't mind paying a higher price for good quality. I'd prefer to find a good used antique one somewhere, but might be a bit more lost as to knowing wether or not it's any good.

I've found that flexcut makes a small drawknife that's apparently flexible, which maybe would work? Didn't see anything on Lee Valley's website. Lie-Nielsen has a somewhat expensive one that says it's curved, but doesn't look to be curved.. https://www.lie-nielsen.com/product/drawknives/1-draw-c-drawknives?node=4090


Thanks again for all your quality posts!

-WY
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Pie
Posts: 1831
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
122
chicken dog forest garden hugelkultur hunting toxin-ectomy
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
drawknives

also do a search for traditional wood working tools, there are quite a few companies that still sell the hand tools needed for traditional wood working.

For coopering you will find that there are a few tools that just might need to be made by you. It is nearly impossible to find a croze shave ( croze plane) anymore except for antique ones, which do still work if they aren't cracked.

Other tools that are handy to have on hand are Scorp, Spoke Shaves, Planes, In-shave, Coopers Adze, Hoop driver and hammer (if using metal bands) and Coopers In-shave.

this site: barrel making
has lots of good links as well as photos/ drawings of the tools of this trade.

This site is also good: tools of the cooper trade
 
Mike Patterson
Posts: 37
Location: nemo, 5a/b
9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks, Bryant. Those links were very helpful. I think I'm looking for an inshave.

What about using a router for cutting the croze?

-WY
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Pie
Posts: 1831
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
122
chicken dog forest garden hugelkultur hunting toxin-ectomy
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Cutting the Croze with a router would probably be doable but the proper shape is not available in a single router bit to my knowledge.
 
steve folkers
Posts: 4
3
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mike Patterson wrote:Thank you, Judith, for all this great information and wonderful pictures!

I'm trying to track down a curved drawknife and am having somewhat of a hard time finding a good source. Would your husband (or anyone else) have any recommendations for where to buy one or a good manufacturer to look out for? I don't mind paying a higher price for good quality. I'd prefer to find a good used antique one somewhere, but might be a bit more lost as to knowing wether or not it's any good.

I've found that flexcut makes a small drawknife that's apparently flexible, which maybe would work? Didn't see anything on Lee Valley's website. Lie-Nielsen has a somewhat expensive one that says it's curved, but doesn't look to be curved.. https://www.lie-nielsen.com/product/drawknives/1-draw-c-drawknives?node=4090

Thanks again for all your quality posts!

-WY


You seem to have the major woodworker's tool sites ( if you also have Woodcraft and Traditional Woodworker). I can only add that I suppose that by "curved" you mean a barrel cooper's hollow knife, presumably still available from more specialized cooper's tool suppliers, at astronomical prices. I don't use one (although I have inshaves for bowls, etc.); I use a 4" scorp on buckets and churns and a 1 1/2" one on smaller stuff. I do tubs so rarely it hasn't been a problem. (I do the hollowing of the inside of the staves after setting up, or raising, the vessel, instead of hollowing staves individually beforehand as barrels are done.)

See Alex Stewart in The Foxfire Book 3 for making your own croze. The old French word croze just means cross, because the tool is basically a specialized marking gauge, a stick through a board (looking like a cross from the side),adjustable and held by a wedge. The cutting tooth on a bucket croze is usually a piece of an old file, burnt to un-harden, with saw teeth filed into it. (A barrel croze has two knife blades and a "hawk" raker.) Router or croze, whatever you use, the important thing is to get a clean edge to the groove, without chatter or rip-outs that would leak. Usually this means going around and around, a lot of careful little cuts, instead of one big oops.
IMG_1968.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_1968.JPG]
my croze...from the top
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic