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High and Dry plant list

 
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Location: Phoenix, AZ (9b)
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Eric Toensmeier reviews plants from Robert Nold's book "High and Dry" in this article for Permaculture news.



Robert’s book is quite remarkable and offers great information on growing and propagating these species. He doesn’t say which are edible or otherwise useful though. This article is intended as a “key” to help permaculturists and edible landscapers utilize his book to select species for a cold, arid perennial food production system. I’ve already cross-indexed them with other resources for you. High and Dry also has much to say on the subject of gardening in cold, dry climates in general – for example, he reports that most of these plants grow in soils with little or no organic matter in their native habitats, and are more vulnerable to disease in compost-enriched soils.



 
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Location: In a rain shadow - Fremont County, Southern CO
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Neil Bertrando recommended this book on permies awhile back (cant remember which thread), and i think it is a must for anyone in the intermountain west.

when the author (from Denver) talks about dryland garden, he refers to NO irrigation after the first year [generally]. any plant that can live on the natural rainfall is a keeper for sure.
i also really like the section on rock gardens, but wish the tree section were larger.

ill check out the link

here is a link to the book on amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/High-Dry-Gardening-Cold-Hardy-Dryland/dp/1604694475/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1404939976&sr=8-3&keywords=high+and+dry+book
 
Jennifer Wadsworth
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Kelly - it's the same guy!

Must be a great book if both Eric and Neil recommend it.
 
pollinator
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Location: Northern New Mexico, Zone 5b
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I own the book - though it has been a couple years since I read it...

My memory of it is that he strongly promotes native plants and no irrigation after plants are established. IMO he comes across as a curmudgeon about it. The book has some good information. Although from a permaculture standpoint, I think Eric's article (linked in the original post) summarizes some of the most useful information.
 
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