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Hugel Hedge?

 
gardener
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Location: Southern alps, on the French side of the french /italian border 5000ft elevation
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Hi everybody!


Well, i was asking myself a question, what do i plant as a hugel hedge, to keep my neighbor in his plot of land?

I was thinking blackberries, but, i'm affraid it might invade his space too much. Same goes for raspberries. I'd like something with pointy bits, adapted to the mountains. The ground is an ancient river bed or glacier lake's bottom. Not the best ground you can have. Plenty of stones.

Or something which will contain his chickens and dogs somewhat. And produce fruits. Not too tall as well.

Any idea?

Thanks.

Max.
 
Posts: 14
Location: Wisconsin zone 3/4
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The hugel mound itself, if built a meter or more up, makes a very noticeable barrier. It probably won't do much to keep his animals out. That said, dogs are known to go through brambles and thickets which would turn most of us away. If his dog wants to motor on through, then the dog will go through raspberries. However, a well managed berry patch next to a close planting of roses might be thorny enough to turn the hound away on a majority of occasions.
 
steward
Posts: 1191
Location: Torrey, UT; 6,840'/2085m; 7.5" precip; 125 frost-free days
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Gooseberries.
Seaberry (sea buckthorn)

These won't travel but can have wicked thorns.
I might alternate with juniper (make gin!) or another conifer for winter visual screening. Not sure if that applies to your situation.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3738
Location: Vermont, off grid for 24 years!
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Seaberry was my first thought too.
 
Satamax Antone
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Thanks a lot guys and gals.

Ann, purfect answer for me! Gooseberries. They grow naturaly here, and i'm a huge fan of thoses. I'll check seaberries.

I don't need to grow juniper, there's plenty in the mountain around. And with my liver probs, i'd rather avoid making gin. I've distiled enough nasty stuff in my life

Tho juniper berries are nice in "paté" and sauerkraut.

Any idea about what i can pair with gooseberries for a better interaction between plants?

Well i was rereading the Holzer's permaculture article. The blackberries seem not well regarded. http://www.richsoil.com/sepp-holzer/sepp-holzer-permaculture.jsp I wouldn't mind a pig, but, letting a pig eat blackberries seems sacrilegious to me!


Thanks a lot.

Max.
 
Posts: 171
Location: Deutschland (germany)
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what about: hawthorn, dog rose (rosa canina) or Serviceberry?

regards
Ludger
 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
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Satamax Antone wrote:
Tho juniper berries are nice in "paté" and sauerkraut.



Don't forget Choucroute_garnie!
 
pollinator
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Location: West Yorkshire, UK
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I second hawthorn. Also berberis: can be very prickly, and can have very nice berries (mine is both); and gorse (ulex) is another prickly one, and a nitrogen fixer. Rugosa rose also has a lovely scented flower, and fat juicy hips.
 
Ludger Merkens
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if you like roses:
rosa canina, rosa rugosa, and rosa villosa all have nice edible hips. There are also some cultured varieties like "Vitaminrose PiRo 3" or "Apothekerrose" you could use for the purpose.

 
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Location: Georgia, USA
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Rugosa roses. Boom pretty, delicious rose hips full of vit C. Very thorny and hardy.
 
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