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Is this a bee? Identification help needed

 
Posts: 55
Location: Lake Arrowhead, CA
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My mother discovered this bizarre little creature in her garden. I've never seen anything quite like it. Any idea what it might be(e)?
bumblebird1.jpg
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bumblebird2.jpg
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bumblebird3.jpg
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Justin Jones
Posts: 55
Location: Lake Arrowhead, CA
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Well it looks most like a moth of some sort. Maybe this should be moved to the bugs forum?
 
gardener
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Looks to be a Hummingbird Moth. Clear-ish wings, markings like a bee or wasp, hovers to drink nectar, and those little tufts at the end of it's abdomen.... pretty sure it is.
 
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Location: New England
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Yep, a Hummingbird Moth.
 
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This is the adult form of the hornworm caterpillar. http://www.fcps.edu/islandcreekes/ecology/hummingbird_moth.htm
 
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Location: Central Maine - Zone 4b/5a
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While hummingbird moths do come from hornworm-type caterpillars, the tomato hornworm pupates into a nocturnal moth, as far as I know. There are many beautiful hummingbird moths that are active during the day, and they aren't going to eat your tomatoes.
 
pollinator
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They're beautiful creatures.

This one is a Hummingbird Hawk Moth who got his probiscus stuck in a Star Jasmine and I took advantage of his plight to make a little video. He escaped with no hard feelings.



 
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