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cooking and growing yacon  RSS feed

 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 883
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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Yacon is a very underutilized crop. I grows as easy as Jerusalem artichokes, hut tastes way better and is less invasive.
I used it in replacement for other root crops in roasts risottos etc and this was very nice but I would like more recipes for yacon.
There must be some very traditional recipes because it was grown for a long time.
(Spanish recipes are OK too as it is a crop from the Andes).
Does someone here save the seeds and breeds yacon?
 
John Polk
steward
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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In the Andes, yacon is seldom cooked, but rather grated over salads and other foods.
Here is a link to 4-5 pages about yacon from Lost Crops of the Incas

 
Su Ba
pollinator
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Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
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I grow yacon for both human and livestock food. We like to eat it raw, grated or cubed in fruit salads, cole slaw, and potato salad. I'll also slice it thin and dip it in yogurt as an evening snack. I no longer eat potato chips, so this becomes one of my nibble foods. I also drop chunks into the blender when i make smoothies. I don't peel it if it is freshly harvested. I just use a brush and scrub it well. But older tubers I peel because the skin develops a taste we don't like. I'm told you can use the leaves for tea, but I haven't tried that.

The livestock eat the leaves, flowers and tender stems. When I pull up the plants, they will also eat the excess "starts" at the base if I chop them up.

I've had no pest problems to date other than mice occasionally. It grows great in my garden soil and seems to benefit from a side dressing of composted manure when it gets about four foot high (before flowering time).
 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 883
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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No cooking? Strange. For me it seems to be and ideal easy to grow root fir cooking.
 
William Whitson
Posts: 50
Location: Washington coast
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It is generally treated like a fruit and eaten raw. There is no reason that it can't be cooked though.

Yacon pollen is mostly defective and there may be additional reproductive problems, such as variable ploidy. It is very rare to get seeds and very difficult to get them to germinate if you do. All the more reason to try!
 
William Bronson
Posts: 1289
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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All the descriptions I find describe growing yacon from the crowns. I am wondering, will they also grow from a tuber?
Most of my jchokes come from some moldering marked down grocery store tubers, I am hoping to grow Yukon from grocery store tubers as well.
 
William Whitson
Posts: 50
Location: Washington coast
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William Bronson wrote: All the descriptions I find describe growing yacon from the crowns. I am wondering, will they also grow from a tuber?
Most of my jchokes come from some moldering marked down grocery store tubers, I am hoping to grow Yukon from grocery store tubers as well.


No, only from the rhizome. Occasionally, a tuber will come away with a bit of the rhizome still attached, so you could look for that, but if they have been trimmed, you're probably out of luck.
 
William Bronson
Posts: 1289
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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