• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • paul wheaton
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Joylynn Hardesty
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • James Freyr
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Ash Jackson
  • thomas rubino
  • Carla Burke

Plum suckers are root stock ?

 
pollinator
Posts: 4328
Location: Anjou ,France
243
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Could I use plum suckers as root stock for Apples ?
Or am I wasting my time ? I have lots of plum suckers and very few quince .

David
 
Posts: 171
Location: Deutschland (germany)
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi David,
it is highly unlikely to use plum as root stock for apples. You can use plum as rootstock for other plants of genus 'prunus' like peach, apricot or even almond, but not for apple (malus).
the closer they are related, the better your chances for a successful graft.
 
Posts: 156
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi David

I myself have gotten excellent results grafting apple scions onto the prodigy of store-bought apples. Just excise the seeds out of few apple cores and plant them in soil immediately before they dry out. I graft my scions the following winter and I've gotten 80-90% success that way. Grafting got so easy that I started grafting multiple varieties per tree. My personal best so far is 5 varieties on one seedling. In my own experence, apples only graft onto apples and pears only onto pears. I've read somewhere that either apples were grafted onto pear rootstock, or pears onto apple rootstock, but in my hands it didn't work.

For grafting Japanese plums, almond rootstock has worked well for me. This is what Luther Burbank used more than 100 years ago. Just go to Trader Joe's and pick up a bag of raw almonds and plant them in soil. After they've germinated I've successfully grafted plum, peach, necturine, and apricots onto almond stock.

Good luck!
 
David Livingston
pollinator
Posts: 4328
Location: Anjou ,France
243
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks folks
Oh well worth an ask I thought . I shall see about the apricots though.

David
 
pollinator
Posts: 533
Location: West Yorkshire, UK
125
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Slightly related: will plum suckers bear fruit?
 
Ludger Merkens
Posts: 171
Location: Deutschland (germany)
4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Galadriel,

well - that depends. In this case it depends on the root stock choosen, for the 'original' tree. Suckers are shoots emerging directly from the rootstock of the plum, so they might express very different fruit qualities than the plum you know. Rootstock varieties are usually selected for their hardiness, growing size, disease resistance etc. not so much for their fruit quality. If you don't know, which variety was choosen for the original tree, it is impossible to tell. It is very likely, that you get some fruit, it is unlikely, that it the same or even similar to the 'original'.
But if you have the place to try, go ahead. There are some plum varieties which are raised from seed, so you might be lucky.

Ludger
 
Did you ever grow anything in the garden of your mind? - Fred Rogers. Tiny ad:
Mike Oehler's Low-Cost Underground House Workshop & Survival Shelter Seminar - 3 DVD+2 Books Deal
https://permies.com/wiki/48625/Mike-Oehler-Cost-Underground-House
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic