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Can I use shoots and leaves as the nitrogen component of compost?

 
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Hi.

In my garden, I'm trying to do composting with something like the Berkeley method. I have no problem finding dry, brown, carbonaceous materials, but I'm wondering about the nitrogen component. I could get manure or food scraps from off-site, but it would take a lot of effort to gather them. It would be easier for me to just use the young shoots and green leaves I have on site. I think that because they are still wet and green, they should have a good proportion of nitrogen. Am I right about this?
 
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In general the growing (green) parts of plants are higher in nitrogen than the browns (leaves, branches). The greens from some plants are particularly high in nitrogen. These will make the compost pile heat up faster and to a higher temperature. You might also consider other sources of nitrogen - spent coffee grounds for example. I like to add blood and bone in a hot compost mix.

Have a go and don't worry too much. The results are well worthwhile whatever the mix or method.
 
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Dominick Triolio wrote: It would be easier for me to just use the young shoots and green leaves I have on site. I think that because they are still wet and green, they should have a good proportion of nitrogen


Welcome to permies Dominick
(and Druce too!)
I'd say "yes" to the nitrogen. Probably not as high as some things like grass clippings and coffee grounds, but still pretty high.
Something I keep in mind is that if I only compost material from my own place
and there's a soil deficiency of some sort, I will make compost that's also deficient in that thing, and so on.
It may not be an issue at all, it's just something I keep in mind,
and a different reason for importing 'stuff'.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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