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Rustic Split Rail Fence design idea - My building pictures

 
Pierre Talbot
Posts: 58
Location: Saguenay
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Hello friends,

Last year, to give a more rustic look in front of the country house, I decided to make a cedar rail fence. Authentic, ancestry or country style design fence. I can't find anything on the Internet to help me for this building.

So I share to you my experiment as a result of field observations and building.

The anti-fungal properties of cedar requires no special maintenance !

Idea to add rustic appeal to your front yard !

See ----> My rustic split rail fence in front of my country house

Picture outcome:

 
Bill Bradbury
pollinator
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Location: Richmond, Utah
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Very nice, this is how we fenced pastures where I grew up in the west desert of Utah. We used Juniper since the ranchers would pay for you to cut and remove them from their range land. We didn't dig though, cause that'd be too much work, so the design is triangular supports with rails on both sides, then a crossover every third support. These used to be all over, but now it's mostly barbed wire.
 
Pierre Talbot
Posts: 58
Location: Saguenay
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Interesting material Bill.

 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Nicely Done! Love split rail fences, I truly do.

I was going to put ne in along the front of our property (600+ feet) but then found some Osage Orange fruits this fall.

I will be planting the seeds about 2 feet apart and growing an old fashioned Osage Orange Hedge Row for our frontage fence now. Free and fairly labor less, my idea of the perfect fence.
 
kyle saunders
Posts: 45
Location: Sackville/Graywood, Nova Scotia
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I saw loads and loads of these when I was on the west coast last summer. Never really noticed them before.

Back here on the east coast again and I see them from time to time, but I think our lack of cedar is a big reason.

Bill, your idea sounds good but I can't orient the triangle in my mind, could you elaborate further?!

Beautiful fences though, even when derelict I find them pretty.
 
Bill Bradbury
pollinator
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Location: Richmond, Utah
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Kyle,

I searched the web for photos and found none, so I'll have to take a photo of a fence I built for a client a decade ago. I'll post it later.

Imagine and upside down V with rails on both sides and a rail every third V that crosses to the other side of the V. This is to keep the cattle from leaning on it and taking it down.
 
kyle saunders
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Location: Sackville/Graywood, Nova Scotia
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Every third support is like a capital 'A' then?

▲=▲=A=▲=▲=A=▲=▲

Sounds like you've made it clear if I'm understanding right. If you take a picture it'd still go a long way, but don't put too much effort into it!

Thanks
 
elle sagenev
Posts: 1261
Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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Bill Bradbury wrote:Very nice, this is how we fenced pastures where I grew up in the west desert of Utah. We used Juniper since the ranchers would pay for you to cut and remove them from their range land. We didn't dig though, cause that'd be too much work, so the design is triangular supports with rails on both sides, then a crossover every third support. These used to be all over, but now it's mostly barbed wire.


That is the fence we have in front of our house. I thought it was designed to let animals through though.
 
elle sagenev
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Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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Here is a pic of the fence we have. I think that's what he means.
fence.png
[Thumbnail for fence.png]
 
kyle saunders
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Location: Sackville/Graywood, Nova Scotia
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Yep I didn't see it like that at all. ha.

Really simple fence though. We have a ton of granite at varying distances above and below ground level so digging is not a guaranteed method.

Bill, how would you imagine a similar fence for goats? for pigs? I would guess more cross rails would be all you need as these critters are smaller than cattle.

Maybe the goats would climb it like steps? Maybe you'd have to use the outside of the triangle to keep them in. It would end up looking like a lean-to surrounding the pen, which doesn't sound like the worst idea to me, just maybe too intensive.

Got endless balsam fir and spruce for poles though. Good ideas. Thanks all.

And Danielle, kudos for being clever to just google street view.
 
elle sagenev
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Location: Zone 5 Wyoming
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kyle saunders wrote:Yep I didn't see it like that at all. ha.

Really simple fence though. We have a ton of granite at varying distances above and below ground level so digging is not a guaranteed method.

Bill, how would you imagine a similar fence for goats? for pigs? I would guess more cross rails would be all you need as these critters are smaller than cattle.

Maybe the goats would climb it like steps? Maybe you'd have to use the outside of the triangle to keep them in. It would end up looking like a lean-to surrounding the pen, which doesn't sound like the worst idea to me, just maybe too intensive.

Got endless balsam fir and spruce for poles though. Good ideas. Thanks all.

And Danielle, kudos for being clever to just google street view.



I don't think you'd want to use this to hold livestock in. Google "trail fencing". That's what I was led to believe this type of fence was for. It is only on the part in front of the house. The rest of our property is post and wire fenced for livestock. This fence deterred the horses but I do not believe it would deter much else. We just go under or over it. Maybe if you did this type of fence and then put electric wire at ground level it would work.

And HA. Yeah. Google baby!
 
Bill Bradbury
pollinator
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Location: Richmond, Utah
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Danielle Venegas wrote:Here is a pic of the fence we have. I think that's what he means.


Yep, that's what I'm talking about, but there are typically rails on both sides.

In the west, we have a saying; you don't fence your animals in, you fence your neighbors' animals out.

These are rangeland fences for cows and horses. Sheep and goats need other types of fences like no-climb wire on vertical posts. Usually they have a shepherd though.

 
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