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will a greywater pond be safe? Safe enough to grow food in?

 
Gilbert Fritz
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Location: Denver, CO
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I am hoping to have a tropic greywater marsh in a greenhouse to filter water, since I want to use water year around. (The fact that I can double the amount of time I am utilizing greywater should make up for the amount lost by transpiration from the marsh.)

If I ran the marsh water into a pond, would the pond be safe enough to grow food in? gaia's garden has a greywater fed pond in it, but they did not mention growing food. And that greywater pond was in a dry climate, too.

As a side question, what are some good tropic (greenhouse) greywater plants?

edited to add: I found information that showed a reed bed can evaporate between 3 and 9 feet of water a year. That comes to 900 to 2100 gallons of water a year off of my 40 ft2 marsh. We should produce at least 100 gallons a day, so, between 9 and 21 days of greywater would be lost WITH the greenhouse greywater marsh, as opposed to half the year without.

 
allen lumley
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Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
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Gilbert Fritz : unless you have perfect southern exposure with full sky line access I think you will be running at the low end of the scale,
with a major drop in the winter months !

More to the point how much water do you use! How many in your family ? Are you collecting rain water for washing yourself and clothes
or diverting washing machine Rinse water for the next wash or to fill / refill a toilet !

Take a look at the forum thread posted by Forest Gilbert - ''Grey water reed bed system'', in the grey water forum at permits, I do
not know how many gallons he can successfully run through his modest system, but it certainly does not need an entire marsh field !

Y. M. M. V.! for the Good of the crafts ! Big AL
 
allen lumley
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Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
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Gilbert F. : You might be interested in the Tread '' Use duck pond water for fodder and fertilizer in the ducks and geese forum, I quickly scanned it
so just maybe i don't know how far you have got with your project ! Big al
 
Shawn Harper
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Location: Portlandia, Oregon
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Gilbert Fritz wrote:I am hoping to have a tropic greywater marsh in a greenhouse to filter water, since I want to use water year around. (The fact that I can double the amount of time I am utilizing greywater should make up for the amount lost by transpiration from the marsh.)

If I ran the marsh water into a pond, would the pond be safe enough to grow food in? Gaia's garden has a greywater fed pond in it, but they did not mention growing food. And that greywater pond was in a dry climate, too.

As a side question, what are some good tropic (greenhouse) greywater plants?

edited to add: I found information that showed a reed bed can evaporate between 3 and 9 feet of water a year. That comes to 900 to 2100 gallons of water a year off of my 40 ft2 marsh. We should produce at least 100 gallons a day, so, between 9 and 21 days of greywater would be lost WITH the greenhouse greywater marsh, as opposed to half the year without.



I ponder a similar idea once myself.

Regarding its safety, the purpose of the marsh is to filter it so that it is safe, so I would say as long as you packed it with plants that would be fine. The trick is the plants should not be food plants but functional still in some way perhaps. My first thought is bamboo, which has several non edible uses and could under the large amount of water, however you would have to find one that did not grow too tall.

As for evaporation, I dod not believe that would be an issue. If your green house is sealed well it will develop a micro climate with dew drops on the top. So the only water lost would be the amount between the house and the green house. Maybe that can be reduced with some shade, there was a thread about fruit trees filtering everything that goes into their fruit so I would think a little grey water on some would be ok.

If you go forward with it I would love to see some pics.
 
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