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Plant ID help  RSS feed

 
Posts: 108
Location: W. CO, 6A
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Hey all, got a plant I need to ID. I have my suspicions, but I want to see if I'm right.
I'd really like this to be an edible tree, but I'm not going to rely on my own diagnosis before eating it.
I will take it to the county extension office and try to get an "official" ID later this week.
The plant is a multi-trunk tree, very bushy, about 12-15 feet tall, 6-8 feet spread.
Lots of red berries, in clusters. Large seed for fruit size. White seed. (see pics)
It's an ornamental/transplanted tree, so probably not native.
Let me know if you need to know anything else.

Thanks!

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gardener
Posts: 622
Location: Soutwest Ohio
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It looks like it might be a variety of Crataegus (Hawthorns) plant. Unfamiliar with that particular leaf structure, but the fruit certainly seems consistent with the species. Since they have a number of leaf configurations, including lobed varieties, I think it might be a good fit.
 
Posts: 172
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I also thought it looked like hawthorn, even the leaves, but the seed is wrong for that. Hawthorns have seeds like an apple, not one large seed.
 
D. Logan
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Posts: 622
Location: Soutwest Ohio
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I don't have personal experience with any hawthorn but the ones with multiple seeds, so this would be best confirmed with someone who knows more directly, but I understand that there is a single-seed variety with a pome that looks a lot like a peach or plum pit in miniature. That seems to match this pretty closely. Even without an expert, if the tree has thorns especially, I would expect it is some variation on a Hawthorn. Even if it doesn't, the listing as it being ornamental implies that it is a cultivar that was bred to make a nice lawn tree, so a lack of thorns could have been a breeding trait and the seed a side-effect.
 
Posts: 93
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Perhaps Crataegus monogyna, (Single-seeded Hawthorn).
 
Posts: 299
Location: Oklahoma
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The fruit looks like an ornamental plum, but I never saw those lobed leaves on an ornamental plum. There are so many though, hard to tell.
 
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