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Fasting: I find it easier to "not eat" than to "eat less"  RSS feed

 
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Chris Wang wrote:Are their any benefits of longer fasts that you don't get by eating once a day? I don't have any trouble losing weight, are there other advantages to fasting 2+ days?  

Yes!  All kinds of benefits, but the one  I am most interested in is it can cause your body to shed dead cells and then rejuvenate by activating stem cells.  Explained way better here:   https://www.foundmyfitness.com/episodes/zero-fasting-qa

The podcast also talks about a 5 day fast mimicking diet whereby you get to eat limited calories in very specific macronutrient radios.  The easy way to do it is to buy the prolon food package mentioned in the podcast, but I preferred the challenge of making my own food.  

I created my own modeled after this guy: https://www.quantifiedbob.com/fasting-mimicking-diet/#resources.    I did do a little more calories than I was supposed to.  I did the same calories as Bob, and he weighs 172 pounds (I only weigh 120).   Mainly because I was scared.  :)    But it wasn't bad and next time I will scale it back.  

My plan is attached.

Your other question: google food combining.

Filename: Fast-Mimicking-Diet-2-19.pdf
File size: 25 Kbytes
 
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I just did a 23 hour fast today that I broke at 6 this evening.  I found it really easy this time.  I could easily have skipped dinner and extended it until tomorrow when i get to work which would have added another 14 hours.  I'm convinced the first day or two is more mental than physical. I havent gone past 36 hours so I can't comment on that but I think I'll try 48 soon just to see how it goes.  I find that going from dinner one day to dinner the next is very easy if i stay busy.  If i get bored i want to eat,  so i try not to let that happen.
 
steward
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Chris Wang wrote:Are their any benefits of longer fasts that you don't get by eating once a day? I don't have any trouble losing weight, are there other advantages to fasting 2+ days?



Other than accelerated weight loss, benefits of longer fasts include a decrease in IGF-1 (see my post on the first page of this thread) and autophagy.  Autophagy is literally "self eating," and it refers to the body doing a general deep clean and internal declutter.  When you go days without eating protein, the body does NOT want to lose useful things like muscle, so it looks hard for things to use that won't be missed.  Bits'n'bobs that aren't serving any useful purpose get munched by the body's own internal cleanup system.

Dr. Fung reports that his fasting patients never have loose and floppy skin, even when they lose extremely large amounts of weight.  This is attributed to autophagy.  They never need to have plastic surgery to remove redundant skin, although folks who lose weight via multiple smaller meals and exercise often need this.

Some cancer experts recommend a yearly week long water fast as an anti-cancer strategy.  Little bits of tumor have no useful purpose and will be consumed when the body goes into deep clean mode.  Cancer is generally dependent on glucose and you move into a super low glucose state in an extended fast - the brain starts running on ketones.

Beyond that, lots of people attest to mental clarity and increased energy during an extended fast.  Others describe spiritual awakening and other effects.  Most major religions have traditions of fasting.
 
pollinator
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I think intermittent fasting would be very beneficial, but I have one problem.... I don't know what effect it might have on afib (also high blood pressure).  I suspect it would be beneficial, but can't find evidence to support my 'hope'.  Anyone know of any, one way or the other?  Thanks : )
 
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My blood pressure dropped 20 points during/after my first week long fast. And stayed down when I resumed eating. It is the primary reason that I have continued the practice on a yearly basis.
 
Julia Winter
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nancy sutton wrote:I think intermittent fasting would be very beneficial, but I have one problem.... I don't know what effect it might have on afib (also high blood pressure).  I suspect it would be beneficial, but can't find evidence to support my 'hope'.  Anyone know of any, one way or the other?  Thanks : )



I'm not an adult doctor, I'm a pediatrician, so I've not treated anybody with atrial fibrillation.  I can't imagine how spending some time hungry would mess with that, unless you found it very stressful or upsetting.  I would start with a 16 hour fast (limiting your eating to between noon and 8pm, for example) and see how that goes.  It's not unreasonable to put a call in to your doctor to say that you are considering 16:8 intermittent fasting and what does he/she think.  Certainly if you found going without a meal to be stressful or upsetting then I'd recommend some other strategy for health.

I'm realizing I need to stop telling people that I'm eating one meal a day - they tend to become alarmed.  I'm working with a personal trainer (along with my 12 year old - it was a Christmas present as gyms won't allow 12 year olds to use the fitness equipment) and when I told her, she exclaimed "you'll go into starvation mode and then you can't burn any fat!!"  

Which is nonsensical.  

Firstly, waiting 22-23 hours to eat is not going to starve anyone but a baby (I don't want newborns going more than 4 hours between feeds).  Secondly, if you were starving, that's exactly when your body burns the fat.  That's what it's for.  Duh.
 
Julia Winter
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I still haven't tried to go longer than 23 hours or so, but I am doing a pretty good job of sticking to one meal a day.  (OK, I'm having milk at 1pm, and then dinner with my family.)

Sometimes if I'm at work late (well after 6pm) I will have a handful of mixed nuts before I get in my care to go home.  If I have a rough day I will have three handfuls of mixed nuts.  Other than the latte during my 1-2pm lunch hour, I'm having nothing but water and tea, maybe black coffee with a tiny splash of half'n'half.  My office mate is eating hot lunch at our shared desk (it's side by side, it's really something to see).

Weight loss has been just OK.  I dropped 5 pounds pretty quickly, then plateaued forever, and more recently have starting losing again. I'm about 7 pounds down at the moment.  I'm fitting into smaller pants (but I feel like I still have a ways to go on this.)

I continue to prefer this as a strategy.  It's still much easier to simply amputate any thoughts of eating as they occur (I just think "nope") . . . up until dinnertime.  I was on an inexorable weight gain pattern, so even slow weight loss is good.  I really enjoy eating, and I'd rather have one awesome meal than three sad ones.
 
master pollinator
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I am the same way. If I notice my jeans getting too snug, the easiest way for me to lose weight is to eat fewer meals. It is much harder for me to drop weight if I just try to eat smaller portions but keep on eating 3 meals per day. I think that just slows down my metabolism, but my weight just doesn’t seem to drop.

What I do is to have a fried egg in the morning with my coffee - there is something about that shot of protein and fat that helps me to make it through until dinner. Then I won’t eat again until evening. I get hungry at noon, being used to eating lunch. So I drink a big glass of water or 2, and the hunger goes away. Then I can eat a normal evening meal. And pretty soon my jeans feel loose again. 😸
 
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And I think it is worth mentioning a little note of moderation, because I tend to go all out to both extremes before I find a happy medium, with almost everything I do. And I found what Jakob Lund Fisker said, in Early Retirement Extreme, to really hit it home for me about how to appropriately view and apply diet and exercise in my life.

What it boiled down to was- eat according to your lifestyle. And Jakob made a few classifications- runner, bodybuilder, farmer, and warrior.

The farmer and warrior lifestyles kind of made it easier for me to understand when it would be better and okay for me to eat three meals and when it would be better and okay for me to eat just one meal. Jakob described a farmer as a person who spends the entire day doing manual labor, which is exactly what I did at Wheaton Labs when I visited for a weekend, so I believe that to be true, and I ate three meals a day there, and I was fine. I didn't gain or lose any weight, and my body composition stayed roughly the same.

Whereas, at college, which is mostly sitting in lectures or sitting doing homework, is occasionally interspersed with exercise, like walking, or the high intensity workouts I do twice a week. That fits into what Jakob called the warrior lifestyle, which is accompanied by one meal a day. I have been eating roughly one meal a day, at college, for the past two semesters, so about six to seven months, give or take a month, and my body weight and composition are staying steady and are where I want them to be. So, I think it is useful to consider what one's lifestyle is when applying different types of eating.

And at college, I may throw in a full day fast once a week, but again, I am tempering that with how my body feels and what I am doing that week and the weather. I also find it useful to remind myself what Sally Fallon says about fasting, that fasting is basically applying brooms and mops to a temple-- it helps to clean up the temple every now and then, but brooms and mops alone don't make a temple. So, I am taking a little more consideration before I do a full-day fast, instead of my usual 23-hr fasts. Now, I am more of using the full-day fasts as a way to handle sicknesses, colds, or when I am in general need of healing, because at least in my experience, I have noticed that I heal much quicker on during the times spent on full-day fasts, which when combined with an intermittent fasting routine, leads to a minimum gap of 48 hours between two meals (e.g. one meal on Wednesday, nothing on Thursday, one meal on Friday).
 
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I'm on day 22; down about 30# and my chronic symptoms have either vanished or mostly subsided. Going to resume with a "vitamin" A depletion regime (free info @ https://ggenereux.blog/my-ebooks/ ) to see if that WAPF diet I've been favoring has chronically poisoned me. It's an interesting theory worth investigating, conceived by a guy unaffiliated with either allopathic or naturopathic medicine and their inherent biases. We'll see what happens.
 
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Yes! Fasting is excellent for you. One thing people usually don't even realize is that one of the biggest risk factors for colon and GI cancer in western cultures is the amount of food we eat. I'm a certified oncology nurse, and it blows my mind that we still push a 3 meal a day health recommendation as a culture, when its so much healthier for the pancreas, the GI tract, and the cardiovascular system to frequently fast.

Want to reduce cancer risk significantly? Eat food without pesticide use, and fast. Round-up contaminated food increases cancer risk by 41%. 41%!!! And eating 3 meals a day increases GI cancer risk by.... I'll check my book and get back to you all on the number, lol!

Kelly B.
 
Victor Johanson
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It is interesting (and tragic!) that our culture expects us sit down and feed our faces thrice per day, whether we're hungry or not. I have a friend who told me his doctor (apparently a rare practitioner more enlightened than most) gave him a simple rule: don't eat unless you're hungry. It is salutary to give our digestive infrastructure a break, instead of forcing it to work nonstop to process what we inflict upon it. Ignoring the body's inbuilt signals is a recipe for trouble.
 
Trace Oswald
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Julia Winter wrote: I'd rather have one awesome meal than three sad ones.



Well put.  I feel the same way.
 
pollinator
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Victor Johanson wrote:I'm on day 22; down about 30# and my chronic symptoms have either vanished or mostly subsided. Going to resume with a "vitamin" A depletion regime (free info @ https://ggenereux.blog/my-ebooks/ ) to see if that WAPF diet I've been favoring has chronically poisoned me. It's an interesting theory worth investigating, conceived by a guy unaffiliated with either allopathic or naturopathic medicine and their inherent biases. We'll see what happens.



Hey Victor - this is something I literally came across a few weeks ago and the book was so fascinating. I think there's an automatic instinct to dismiss it (at least, in some people) because the author isn't a doctor or scientist or anything, but he is THOROUGH in his research and I can tell he really did his homework.

I haven't found much information on how reducing the retinol has helped people, have you heard of any success stories? I personally went on a carnivore (zero carb, mostly meat & water) diet a year ago and it drastically changed my life for the better. I also practice fasting, skipping 1-2 days a week usually. But when I read that, it clicked with me that many other zero carb-ers report a reduction in autoimmune symptoms and I wonder if it's because of retinol depletion since the carnivore is inherently very very low in Vitamin A, often completely absent in those who stick with a beef-and-water-only routine. Anyway I was just curious if you had talked to anyone who had successfully been able to reverse autoimmune symptoms with retinol depletion?  
 
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