• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
stewards:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • John F Dean
  • Carla Burke
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Leigh Tate
  • thomas rubino

Chips! From all sorts of veggies

 
steward
Posts: 6356
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1724
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Brenda Groth wrote:was wondering if anyone has tried things like jerusalem artichoke and beets, salsify, carrots, etc. Haven't tried the kale yet but have some in the garden I must remember to pick and try this soon.



Thelma brought in samples to a class of her dehydrated veggies - for soup mix - and we were all munching on them like they were potato chips because they were that good. Carrots, onions, etc. diced in little chunks and dried. They really were yummy.

Inspired by that, I attempted to dry sweet potato slices in my dehydrator. Blech. They did not work at all. I think they were sliced too thick. Would love to hear if others have had success drying veggies that are so good they are snack worthy.
 
Posts: 232
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, they have great step by step photos.

I already had a big bag of chopped up Collard Greens in the fridge, when I read that. So, in the dehydrator they went, without blanching or flavoring.

And they dehydrated very well into crunchiness.

In that blog, she talks about starting the dehydrating cycle with higher heat for the first bit, to save energy, dry out faster and keep the bacteria from forming.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TO answer your question, Jocelyn, try BEET CHIPS! Sliced real thin.

I also just made beet chips, made with red and golden beets. They are yummy.

The recipe for marinate was something like 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar, 1/4 cup water, 1 Tablespoon Olive oil (i might try these with coconut oil sometime). and salt and pepper to taste.

They did not dry out all the way, is that because of the oil?

Also, acorn squash chips. They dried crispy without any marinade.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
26
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
i see kale and collards in the greens dehydrating in the oven with a sauce or seasoning as a "best" ..any recommendations on other greens?
 
Jocelyn Campbell
steward
Posts: 6356
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1724
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Max Hubbard wrote:
TO answer your question, Jocelyn, try BEET CHIPS! Sliced real thin.

I also just made beet chips, made with red and golden beets. They are yummy.

The recipe for marinate was something like 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar, 1/4 cup water, 1 Tablespoon Olive oil (i might try these with coconut oil sometime). and salt and pepper to taste.

They did not dry out all the way, is that because of the oil?

Also, acorn squash chips. They dried crispy without any marinade.



Okay Max, you've convinced me! I'll have to try beet chips! Did you make yours in the food dehydrator or the oven?

You reminded me that I have made oven-roasted squash chips and they were particularly yummy. Haven't tried them in the food dehydrator.

So wishing I had a solar dehydrator...(which would work here in the Pacific NW maybe for a week or two in August)

 
Jocelyn Campbell
steward
Posts: 6356
Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
1724
hugelkultur purity forest garden books food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Brenda Groth wrote:i see kale and collards in the greens dehydrating in the oven with a sauce or seasoning as a "best" ..any recommendations on other greens?



I tried the baby kale with a hazelnut butter/onion/garlic/tamari sauce in the oven and they were a disaster. They wouldn't crisp up. They were somewhat better in the food dehydrator though so thin they crumbled too easily. A light(er) amount of oil (with or without vinegar?) and salt and pepper before oven roasting would have been better for the finer texture of the baby kale in my experience.

It was so disastrous that I wonder if even the full-size kale or collard greens would dry out well enough oven roasted with a nut butter type sauce on them. I haven't tried that in the oven, only in the dehydrator. Anyone else have success with a heavier dressing like this in the oven?

I think most chard greens would be thick enough for either oven or dehydrator, and some spinach, too. Hm, lamb's quarters or nettles might hold up well because they are sturdier leaves, though I've been simply air-drying my nettles and haven't harvested much lamb's quarters.
 
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic