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wofati front edge of roof concerns

 
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uploading the image for the previous post
wofati-edge-good.png
[Thumbnail for wofati-edge-good.png]
 
paul wheaton
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Ron's design sample of the upcoming facade on the berm shed.

Ron has elected a 11 degree slope - the same slope at the roof.



 
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Nice to see the saw kerf drip edge detail.  If the slab boards aren't fully dry they may shrink and expose gaps that face up.  Only way I can think of to avoid that is to put another layer of wood below the "roof" slabs so they act as overlapping shingles.
 
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I asked about that.   The wood is fully dry.  So with a rain event, the wood might swell a bit.  :)
 
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Ive been scheming about this, as the humidity is a major issue here. Additionally, we have occasional earthquakes which make me nervous as it pertains to stretching the liner and causing rents.

I like Mike Oehler's idea about adding extra liner, that seems really prudent. There would be some water retention on the roof in the folds but I think it would actually be fine, as long as it is dispersed. I don't like the idea of violating the liner on the front edge with screws, it seems like sooner or later you would end up with moisture being tracked in along the screws.

I have a bunch of cedar logs that are too short for structural timbers, and I am thinking of this idea. Blue is cedar. The basic idea is no attachment of the liner. It slides free in a channel routed out of the log (in cross section) that allows for an attachment for cedar shakes that block sunlight. You could even leave several inches of line behind the shakes.

Whats the thought?
front-edge.jpg
[Thumbnail for front-edge.jpg]
 
paul wheaton
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I think capping the 2x10 with a log that has a slot carved out of the middle is a cool idea.   My only concern is that the log will check or split.
 
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If the fascia is attached with screws near the bottom, then you could pin the plastic between the 2 boards without puncturing it. I think that any wooden overhang which extends back over the roof, creating a little overhang, will immediately be converted into housing by the local creatures who will appreciate a high and dry home, and they will start chewing up the plastic in short order.

While more involved, I would suggest making a wooden cap from boards (viewed from the side, would look like an upside-down U) which would slide down over the primary board that caps off the soil. So you would have an upright board and the plastic comes up over and down to cover that, and then this wooden cap sits down on top and covers the plastic, holds it in place with just gravity no screws, and doesn't provide habitat for unwanted guests. You can cut a miter edge and then attach fascia below that with a matching miter, so rain will drip out and away. I'm attaching a quick napkin version of what I mean, the cap could be made by nailing 3 boards together so they can slide over the top. I hope it makes sense!


Edited for monster picture size!
 
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some of the facade going up on the berm shed

 
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Mike Haasl wrote:Nice to see the saw kerf drip edge detail.  If the slab boards aren't fully dry they may shrink and expose gaps that face up.  Only way I can think of to avoid that is to put another layer of wood below the "roof" slabs so they act as overlapping shingles.



Why not just shingle or put shakes up it in the first place?

Slabs and log siding split, check and warp, but shingles less so, and shakes hardly at all.

Why not just build a cheap froe and go to town, and the front edge could be covered better with a lot less material. (A block of wood produces an amazing amount of square feet of shingles or shakes).
 
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In a way, isn't what we have here a sort of low grade shakes?

 
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A possible variation with less angle cuts
berm-shed-edge-variation.png
[Thumbnail for berm-shed-edge-variation.png]
 
Travis Johnson
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paul wheaton wrote:In a way, isn't what we have here a sort of low grade shakes?



Sort of, but it is very low grade because it is all sap wood, and has no heart wood in it at all.
 
paul wheaton
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As for shakes - can you make a drawing of how it would work while keeping sun off the plastic and mitigating moisture coming through the nail holes?
 
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paul wheaton wrote:As for shakes - can you make a drawing of how it would work while keeping sun off the plastic and mitigating moisture coming through the nail holes?



You put a layer of Ice and Water Shield between the shingles and the framing members. Ice and Water Shield is great because it self-heals, that is, when you drive a nail through it, the compound flows around the nail and makes it water proof again. Tar paper and other products do not do that.

It is the modern flashing of the day, and is used around windows and doors for that reason.
 
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