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Growing Mulberries with Natural Plant Nursery

 
Posts: 160
Location: Athens, GA Zone 8a
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Steve Thorn wrote:I'm looking into possibly black locust, jujube, and roses in a combination with lilac, agastache, and hyssop for strong smelling plants to hopefully deter them.



I've been looking for something I can plant that will give me something to flavor kombucha with. Blueberries don't do it for me. I know some people use rose hips, and now I'm wondering about jujube. What do they taste like? Ison's carries them, and I've been pleased with the quality of other plants I've bought from them.

I've been thinking about planting some Jostaberry plants: https://www.isons.com/shop/berry-plants/specialty-berry-plants/jostaberry/

 
garden master
Posts: 965
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
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Diane Kistner wrote:I know some people use rose hips, and now I'm wondering about jujube. What do they taste like?



I haven't planted one yet, but hope to this Fall. I've heard it tastes like a sweet and slightly mealy apple and are best dried.

Should be interesting.
 
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Haiti
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Planted my first mulberry. Donated to the university, but I've taken responsibility for all donated trees after they killed about 100 I had gotten donated, through dumb neglect (no accommodation for the dry season and no protection from goats). Now I plant and fence every one and cut open white plastjc shopping bags to serve as sun shades on the west side of each young tree.

Anyhow, my mulberry is a rooted cutting that had a tiny berry on it when I got it, so I should be getting fruit very soon. Should I pick off flowers or fruit when I see them for the first 6-12 months for it to get better established, or does it really matter?

Mine is a weeping variety that I'm really excited to have, but I don't know the name. I'm sure it's somewhere. I'm excited to eat the fruit, but even more for the chickens and bunnies.

It's great seeing everyone's progress. I'm learning a lot about plants I've never grown before!
 
Steve Thorn
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
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Priscilla Stilwell wrote:Planted my first mulberry. Donated to the university, but I've taken responsibility for all donated trees after they killed about 100 I had gotten donated, through dumb neglect (no accommodation for the dry season and no protection from goats). Now I plant and fence every one and cut open white plastjc shopping bags to serve as sun shades on the west side of each young tree.



I've had to protect mine too Priscilla, from deer instead of goats though.

I bet you wouldn't have to worry about using the plastic bags to shade the trees, the big leaves on mine seem to cast a lot of shade, especially if you don't prune.

I leave mine growing naturally around the base of the plant for the most part, which provides some extra shade and polyculture benefits.

Anyhow, my mulberry is a rooted cutting that had a tiny berry on it when I got it, so I should be getting fruit very soon. Should I pick off flowers or fruit when I see them for the first 6-12 months for it to get better established, or does it really matter?



It really helped mine when I picked off the developing fruit this first year. It was struggling, being so young and trying to ripen the fruit. When I removed the fruit, it really exploded with growth about a month or two later.

Mine is a weeping variety that I'm really excited to have, but I don't know the name. I'm sure it's somewhere. I'm excited to eat the fruit, but even more for the chickens and bunnies.

It's great seeing everyone's progress. I'm learning a lot about plants I've never grown before!



That's exciting, I hope you have some tasty mulberries soon!
 
Steve Thorn
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Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
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I love how mulberry leaves look. I get relaxed just walking through the food forest and seeing them. Maybe it's because they look slightly tropical.
Tropical-looking-mulberry-leaves.jpg
Tropical looking mulberry leaves
Tropical looking mulberry leaves
 
Steve Thorn
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Posts: 965
Location: Zone 7b/8a Temperate Humid Subtropical, Eastern NC, US
280
forest garden fish fungi trees foraging earthworks food preservation cooking bee woodworking homestead
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This praying mantis up in the mulberry reminded me of a ninja for some reason.
Ninja-praying-mantis-in-a-mulberry.jpg
Ninja praying mantis in a mulberry
Ninja praying mantis in a mulberry
 
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