• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Devaka Cooray
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Dave Burton
  • Dan Boone
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
  • Mike Barkley

Fiber: Sheep vs. Rabbit

 
pollinator
Posts: 1178
Location: Green County, Kentucky
40
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've seen some lovely stuff made from silk spun with merino wool -- people have experimented with probably every kind of fiber you can imagine.  Much of it turns out really well, you just have to try different things.  I've got a good book on learning to make and use drop-spindles:  Spinning in the Old Way, by Priscilla A Gibson-Roberts.  I've also got A Handspindle Treasury by the editors of Spinoff magazine.  I've done a little spinning on a wheel, more on a drop-spindle (but not enough to become really proficient), and like that the drop-spindle is so easy to make and carry around. 

Kathleen
 
Posts: 427
Location: Hartbeespoort, South Africa
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think this could get to be real fun. I will collect all the silk this season and save until I have my own merino. I like the idea too that the drop spindle can be carried around. In the old days it was the usual thing to bring some kind of handwork when visiting but not the way now... pity. I'll see if I can get some books too. Thanks Kathleen.
 
                                    
Posts: 28
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
From a Do-it-yourself standpoint; the cashmere would be easier.  All the prep to get silk from cocoon to threads ready to spin; imo; wouldn't be worth the hassle...not when cashmere goats are at hand.       

I've some some wool (somewhere in the stash ) dyed blue & purple; with white streaks of bleached Tussah silk running thru it.  One of these days, I'll get it spun into something.   

If it EVER stops storming here in mid-missouri; I have 1 last fleece to wash and get put away before I can get back to spinning.  Then the next batch in line is an intense black Romney...hard on the eyes, but nice when it's finally done. 

 
Posts: 288
Location: Deepwater northern New South wales Australia
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Susan Monroe wrote:The meat from older sheep is called mutton, and is less desirable then lamb due to its stronger flavor.All my old girlfriends claim mutton is ok if ya cook it long enough!!!


I think you're out of luck for multi-purpose rabbits.  The most desirable rabbit for fiber is the Angora.  And you don't have to kill them to get it.

I suspect that comparing rabbit fiber to sheep fiber is like comparing apples to coconuts.  You would have to consider their requirements, benefits, costs, and negative aspects, as well as the likely price you would get for their fiber.

Rabbits are quiet, small, and need some particular housing. If stressed, they will kill their young.  Angoras need to be handled when young so they can be handled when older, to harvest the fiber, and this can't be blown off just because a person doesn't have the time.

Sheep can do really stupid things, and you would need to find out what kinds of sheep produce the most valuable wool, if that's your main concern.  Lower-priced wool may not be worth the effort and cost of shearing, cleaning, carding and packaging.

Don't overlook goats.  The goats that produce cashmere may be very lucrative.  Goats are smart and have minds of their own, they may eat poisonous plants, and they need very good fencing (electric mesh) to keep them confined.

And when you decide which animal you want, you'll have to educate yourself to recognize a good animal of the type. 

Any way you go, I would start with just a couple of them, and see how it goes.  Some people can't deal with sheep, saying they're brainless and stupid.  Discovering that you are one of them is not good if it happens after you buy twenty of them.

And if you have animals, it's probably a given that you will never take another vacation.

Sue

 
andrew curr
Posts: 288
Location: Deepwater northern New South wales Australia
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Emil Spoerri wrote:after labor is factored, sheep are much more productive Big call!!!
cashmere and angora is rather i don't know... for those who can afford it
not exactly fiber but... some meat rabbits have excellent and valuable pelts!

also... llamas...alpacas

 
Hug your destiny! And hug this tiny ad:
Taylor&Zach’s Bootcamp Journey
https://permies.com/t/115886/permaculture-projects/Taylor-Zach-Bootcamp-Journey
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!