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Phoenix Blackdove wrote:

Nicole Alderman wrote:

Phoenix Blackdove wrote:

- add a panel to a garment that's the right size in one area but too small in another, to make it fit (for example, add a panel in the bodice of a dress that's too small in the chest but fits fine from the waist down)



I would LOVE to know how to do this! I have a medieval gown I'd made in 9th grade, and it still fits everywhere except the bust (obviously, I didn't grow much taller, ha!). I would love to be able to wear it again. I even still have extra of the same fabric, but I don't know how to do it correctly.



It's a handy skill to have, since so many people find they aren't the same size as the mythical "average" person a clothing company has used as their sizing template. Depending on garment construction, it can be as simple as opening up the side seams and adding a strip or wedge of fabric to each side of the front panel to make it fit one's new measurements. YouTube and Google are full of a good many decent tutorials (stay away from anything using glue though, those things are the devil).


I actually tried finding tutorials online, but I don't even know the right search terms to use to find the videos. Any resources or terms would be most appreciated ♥ Thank you!!!
 
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Nicole Alderman wrote:

Phoenix Blackdove wrote:

Nicole Alderman wrote:

Phoenix Blackdove wrote:

- add a panel to a garment that's the right size in one area but too small in another, to make it fit (for example, add a panel in the bodice of a dress that's too small in the chest but fits fine from the waist down)



I would LOVE to know how to do this! I have a medieval gown I'd made in 9th grade, and it still fits everywhere except the bust (obviously, I didn't grow much taller, ha!). I would love to be able to wear it again. I even still have extra of the same fabric, but I don't know how to do it correctly.



....


I actually tried finding tutorials online, but I don't even know the right search terms to use to find the videos. Any resources or terms would be most appreciated ♥ Thank you!!!



Nicole, one of the terms is 'refashion'.
 
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Inge Leonora-den Ouden wrote:
Fabrics causing problems when ironing are often synthetics, or at least with synthetics mixed in.



True. Silk is a notable exception. Some wools are also tricky to iron correctly, depending on the weave.

Something I forgot to mention, is that improper ironing can also cover things like putting creases in the wrong spot, or taking out creases that are meant to be there. I've seen spectacular examples of pure wool box pleats ruined by someone who didn't know how to correctly iron them (or indeed, whether they ought to have been ironed in the first place).
 
Phoenix Blackdove
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Nicole Alderman wrote:
I actually tried finding tutorials online, but I don't even know the right search terms to use to find the videos. Any resources or terms would be most appreciated ♥ Thank you!!!



Alas, this got lost for me on the page jump. Here are a few from a quick Google:
How to let out a dress - only works if you have a decent amount of seam and a smallish amount of letting out to do
Using corset loops to make a dress bigger - I pointed a friend to this technique just the other day, for a wonderful unicorn dress that fit everywhere except the bust.
Video of making a bodice bigger by adding a wedge of fabric at the side seams

Google's natural language search algorithm has gotten pretty good now. I find I (usually) get decent results using searches like "how to make [part of body] of [piece of clothing] bigger/smaller". Some examples:
- how to make bodice of dress bigger (A: see above methods)
- how to make bust of dress smaller (A: darts, usually)
- how to make dress bigger in hips (A: side slits or colour blocking are your best bet)
- how to make legs of pants shorter (A: hem them)
- how to make more room in crotch of pants (A: gussets)
- how to make waist of pants lower (A: this is called the rise, and is quite hard to alter well)

These are all things I've Googled over the last several months as I've gone through my/the kids' wardrobe and fabric stash to see what needs altering/mending/making. This method works well when you have a thing that you need to fit better, but want it to stay more or less the same thing.

If you're looking to turn a thing into a different thing, the terms "upcycle" or "refashion" will be your friend. This isn't something I do a whole lot though - by the time clothes reach me they're usually ready for the rag bin or the pet blanket pile. I'm happier to thrift sheets and start from scratch.
 
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