• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Jay Angler
  • Kate Downham

Efficiency tricks for tomato canning

 
Posts: 1
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I use a food processor to grind tomatoes to a pulp..skin and all. I don't mind the skin, and in fact, for me I like it. I make salsa the same way. I never use a recipe for it though, it just depends on what I have on hand out of the garden. I use more tomatoes than any veggie and processing the whole tomato means I can even drink it if I want. a little tomato skin isn't a bother at all to me.  guess it's a preference!
 
Posts: 1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not sure if anyone mentioned this but I'd use a table top fruit press.

https://pleasanthillgrain.com/tabletop-fruit-press-1-25-gallon
 
Posts: 52
Location: nw ohio
1
chicken bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't mind seeds so I core tomatoes and put three or four in hot water. When skins start to peel off I scoop out and place in metal bowl. Place more tomatoes in hot water. with rubber gloves I remove skin and place in clean jars.  Don't take long and have seven jars filled with very little mess. can off in hot water bath.  the tomatoes separate in jar and can be strained to separate with strainer.  I enjoy juice so that isn't wasted and what's left can easily reduced on stove.
 
pollinator
Posts: 452
Location: zone 4b, sandy, Continental D
121
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Whether I make juice for drinking or thick sauce for salsa,  tomato sauce, or fake orange marmalade, I start by tossing the cleaned tomatoes peel and all in the Ninja: I get right away a nice,  relatively thick purée, and since the Ninja is graduated, It gets measured as well for that special recipe. At that point, the juice/purée is cold and uncooked.
I could *also* run it through the Victoria strainer if I really wanted to get rid of the skins, but frankly the bits of skins are cut so fine that they would pass through the Victoria. Perhaps a few seeds would stay behind?
Even my hubby who hates tomato skins [!] likes all the products I make from my tomatoes because he does not know the skins are there. It is only if I make stewed tomatoes or dehydrated tomatoes that I bother peeling them. [I don't make them very often!]. I use Roma tomatoes, which are much meatier. I harvest them a day or two before fully ripe [or the critters get them!]and let them ripen on the counter. This way, you will always get tomatoes that are pretty much "picture perfect".
There is really a big difference between the Ninja and most blenders, and that is my best tip. About the same difference as between a regular lawn mower and a lawn mulcher: the blades are set differently and allow for a much finer product.
 
Posts: 21
Location: East Tennessee, zone 7A-ish
8
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mike Haasl wrote:Cool tip Tammy!  I'm canning the stuff so I'd be worried about affecting the acidity level for tomato sauce.  Enough carrots may make it so you need to pressure can it.  But I don't know for sure...



You don't really need to add all that much carrot, but to be on the safer side, you could add a tablespoon or so of lemon juice or vinegar.


Something to ponder- a lot of the 'newer' tomato varieties have less acid than recommended for bullet-proof water bath canning.
 
gardener
Posts: 2962
Location: Pacific Wet Coast
1081
duck books chicken cooking food preservation ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Tammy Farraway wrote:

Something to ponder- a lot of the 'newer' tomato varieties have less acid than recommended for bullet-proof water bath canning.

Not just tomatoes, Tammy. Humans have decreased the acid levels and increased the sugar levels of many of our commercial fruit and veg over the last 100 years in particular. Many of my grandmother's recipes for jams and preserves need lemon juice added, and *most* modern (last 10 years) recipes seem to call for it. I used to think companies were just being cautious, but now I think it's a problem with acid levels in the raw material as well. Another good reason for growing heritage varieties!
 
pollinator
Posts: 284
Location: New Hampshire
69
hugelkultur forest garden chicken food preservation bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Kate Muller wrote:I grow Upstate Oxheart tomatoes for my sauce.  They are a large meaty tomato with very few seeds and a skin that I do not mind in my sauce. The skin isn't as bitter as most paste tomatoes and is thinner and softer so they don't store well.  I will freeze them till I have enough to cook a large batch.  The tomatoes average between 1 and 3 pounds and are a pretty rose color. They are amazing for fresh eating too.

Using this type of tomato I make sauce by chunking them up and toss them all in a pot to simmer. When they start to cook down I use an immersion blender to puree them.  I simmer them till I like the thickness and the can it. Super easy and very little waste.

 



I am going to be busy today.   These are my Upstate Oxheart Tomatoes.  To give you an idea of the size of these tomatoes the tiles on my counter and back splash are 4" x 4".




Here is what they look like on the inside.  

 
master steward
Posts: 8402
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
2412
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So yesterday I did my first batch.  Freezing the tomatoes (bad spots cut out prior to freezing) and warming them up on the stove worked wonderfully.  I had them defrost overnight and then set them to simmer in two stock pots on the stove.  As soon as they thawed, the water started coming out of them.  Once they were getting hot, I used a mesh scoop for frying food to scoop the tomatoes out.  I set the tomatoes in a colander on top of a stock pot to let them drain a bit before putting them in the final "tomato stock pot".  After emptying the two hot stock pots I combined their tomato water with that from the pot under the colander.  

I ran the tomatoes through the food strainer and it made a nice thick pulp.  I got 3 quarts of pulp and 9 quarts of juicy tomato water.  The tomato water was turned into tomato soup and I'll try to make some salsa from the pulp today.
 
Cécile Stelzer Johnson
pollinator
Posts: 452
Location: zone 4b, sandy, Continental D
121
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Kate Muller wrote:

Kate Muller wrote:I grow Upstate Oxheart tomatoes for my sauce.  They are a large meaty tomato with very few seeds and a skin that I do not mind in my sauce. The skin isn't as bitter as most paste tomatoes and is thinner and softer so they don't store well.  I will freeze them till I have enough to cook a large batch.  The tomatoes average between 1 and 3 pounds and are a pretty rose color. They are amazing for fresh eating too.
Using this type of tomato I make sauce by chunking them up and toss them all in a pot to simmer. When they start to cook down I use an immersion blender to puree them.  I simmer them till I like the thickness and the can it. Super easy and very little waste.

 



I love large tomatoes, but in central WI, they are always a challenge as they start producing late and get interrupted by frost. Are they different from  beefsteak tomatoes [with which I've had very little success]?
 
Kate Muller
pollinator
Posts: 284
Location: New Hampshire
69
hugelkultur forest garden chicken food preservation bee
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Cécile Stelzer Johnson wrote:

Kate Muller wrote:

Kate Muller wrote:I grow Upstate Oxheart tomatoes for my sauce.  They are a large meaty tomato with very few seeds and a skin that I do not mind in my sauce. The skin isn't as bitter as most paste tomatoes and is thinner and softer so they don't store well.  I will freeze them till I have enough to cook a large batch.  The tomatoes average between 1 and 3 pounds and are a pretty rose color. They are amazing for fresh eating too.
Using this type of tomato I make sauce by chunking them up and toss them all in a pot to simmer. When they start to cook down I use an immersion blender to puree them.  I simmer them till I like the thickness and the can it. Super easy and very little waste.

 



I love large tomatoes, but in central WI, they are always a challenge as they start producing late and get interrupted by frost. Are they different from  beefsteak tomatoes [with which I've had very little success]?



They are more of a paste tomato than most of the  beefsteaks I have encounters.  I like this variety because it is an heirloom from NY state which means it is better at handling the cool wet springs and short growing season of Northern New England where I live.  

Here is where I get my seed from.  https://hudsonvalleyseed.com/products/upstate-oxheart-tomato?_pos=1&_psq=upsta&_ss=e&_v=1.0&variant=31250906382381
 
steward
Posts: 3323
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
750
hugelkultur urban chicken food preservation bike bee
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have a method for canning tomato sauce that is efficient in terms of effort, but maybe not in terms of time.  I roast the tomatoes and then run them through a tomato mill to remove the skins and seeds.

So, I started with a box of "ugly" tomatoes - funky heirloom tomatoes from a local farmer.  Red Truck Homestead posted that they were doing a pop-up shop at their home today (Sunday).  The farmer's markets have all been cancelled due to the terrible smoke situation, but they had already picked tomatoes.  

I showed up and was concerned because their stand looked super Portland, super fancy and the heirloom tomatoes were $3.50/lb.  I asked if they had sauce tomatoes, and they answered "No, we just grow the heirloom tomatoes, no paste tomatoes."  

However, I asked again if they had any seconds, any ugly tomatoes, and it turned out they had a whole box.  I got 26+ lbs for $20 (plus a loaf of challah bread from Mt. Tabor bakery).  I already had maybe 8 lbs of tomatoes from my garden cut up and roasting when I drove to their house so I think I used 34 lb of tomatoes, but don't quote me on that.
Ugly-Tomatoes.jpeg
Box of heirloom tomatoes
Box of heirloom tomatoes
 
Julia Winter
steward
Posts: 3323
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
750
hugelkultur urban chicken food preservation bike bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What I do is cut the tomatoes into chunks and fill sheetpans with them.  I have a convection oven, so I roast at 350F until the tips are black and most of the liquid has evaporated.
Cut-tomatoes.jpeg
sheet pan with fresh cut tomatoes
sheet pan with fresh cut tomatoes
Roasted-chunks.jpeg
sheet pan with roasted tomato chunks
sheet pan with roasted tomato chunks
 
Julia Winter
steward
Posts: 3323
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
750
hugelkultur urban chicken food preservation bike bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I load the cooked tomatoes into a really big mixing bowl, and sometimes I pour some of the "tomato water" from the bowl back into a pan to help me get all the browned bits to let go.  

As I loaded up subsequent sheet pans with tomatoes, I poured the juice back into the pans, for more evaporation.
Juice-on-pan.jpeg
Using the juice to loosen up browned bits
Using the juice to loosen up browned bits
tomatoes-plus-juice.jpeg
ready to go in the oven, with extra juice
ready to go in the oven, with extra juice
 
Julia Winter
steward
Posts: 3323
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
750
hugelkultur urban chicken food preservation bike bee
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I ended up with a big mixing bowl full of roasted tomatoes and brownish juice.  Next I run that through a tomato mill. I've learned to run it through three times. The strained sauce goes into a big slow cooker pan, to prep for canning.  

While I am bringing the water to boil in the big canning pot, and cleaning/sterilizing the quart jars, the sauce is heating up in the slow cooker, set to "high."  I use my oven to dry the clean jars, and I wear two pairs of medical gloves so I can pull the hot dry jar from the oven, set it down near the slow cooker and fill to 1/2 inch from the rim.  Then the lid and ring go on and the jar goes into the rack over the bubbling water.  I've got my tea kettle set to boil as well, in case I need more boiling water after all the jars are filled and lowered into the water.  I want at least an inch of water over the tops of the jars.

I got 7 quarts of sauce, plus maybe 3 cups extra. I did a traditional water bath - 40 minutes at a rolling boil.  It's so delicious from the browning reactions, and I never had to do any stirring at all!
Tomato-mill.jpeg
big bowl of chunks, tomato mil, black slow cooker liner
big bowl of chunks, tomato mill, black slow cooker liner
Seven-quarts.jpeg
seven quarts of delicious tomato sauce, and no stirring required!
seven quarts of delicious tomato sauce, and no stirring required!
 
We must storm this mad man's lab and destroy his villanous bomb! Are you with me tiny ad?
Greenhouse of the Future ebook - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/greenhouse
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic