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Paul's A-Frame Wofatish Idea

 
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I suspect the BFL can be raised into position with a gin pole or similarly simple application of pulleys, ropes and poles.  

If it's a truly simple structure destined for a 2 year usable life, I'd think the overhang wouldn't need to be as extreme as shown in Paul's side view.  Or the interior could go further out towards the light.

If the slope of the side logs is quite flat it should be able to keep soil on it.  If it's more like a traditional A frame I'm not sure how you hold the soil on there.  

For the triangle lovers out there, remember that triangles are extremely strong if you don't put a huge load on the sides of them.

Glenn, I like your sketch.  If the building was built into a significant enough slope, the ridge beam could be nearly level and the dug out floor could as well.
 
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Another point related to previous discussion of an a-frame parallel to the hillside: The strength of this plan would come not from any arch-like character, but simply from the fact that each uphill log with soil weight on it is supported by a downhill log carrying the load straight into the earth at its foot. The uphill logs are also stabilized by their foot load being directed partly downward so they won't kick out under load, as mentioned.

If these A-frames have a horizontal partway up (above head level) to brace the length of the uphill log, the loading becomes more complex, and you need to secure the base of the downhill log against being pushed out by the horizontal brace. This would be done simply by digging the feet of the downhill logs into the ground so they can't slip.
 
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A gin pole comes into the "skill" part of my statement Used correctly, that could indeed do the job nicely. Used ignorantly, it could tip over and crush someone. I like the idea of working with less dangerous materials for a first try at building something.
 
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The point of an A-frame is that the "A" is strong and stable. Each A will only have to hold up a minor part of the whole load, and the ridgepole is mostly only to hold the row of A's in place. I don't see the practical benefit of having a massive, strong post and ridge when the side logs will necessarily have plenty of strength on their own. If they are strong enough to hold the cover load, they will be strong enough to hold up their opposite number in the A.
 
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The more I read about this the better it sounds. I want to go on record and say if this idea was to become a kickstarter I would give money to it.

 
Mike Haasl
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I could see something like this as a quick way to build some cabins uphill from the Fisher price home.  Or on the lab.  If you could knock them out in a couple days, why not make a half dozen.  Then as/if they fail the issues can be identified and made better over time.  Some day they might become structures that could last 10 years.
 
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With the dry climate at Wheaton Labs, I could see the first ones lasting half a dozen years, as long as they have a water-shedding cover layer. In the damp climate here, I wouldn't trust one of these for more than a couple of years unless made from black locust or significantly underpinned and isolated with stone and gravel.
 
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All the diagrams have very steep roofs. How can we keep the earthen roof on with this model?

What about the walls? Would you have a slope all the way to floor level?

If it was cheap and easy, I wouldn't mind having to tear it down in a couple years to build a new one. This does look like it might be more cheap and more easy than the psp home.
 
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