gift
Justin Rhodes 45 minute video tour of wheaton labs basecamp
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Mike Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
master gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • John F Dean
  • Steve Thorn

Stone Baerm Adventures

 
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Back up to the toasty weather again. 30C and humid out, so not a whole lot of activity. I did do some work on the hugels though and they are just about ready to be planted in. Put some cardboard down, then stabbed it repeatedly to make sure roots and water can get through before it decomposes. Then I alternated between layers of barn mix and cuttings from the surrounding area. Then some more ash sprinkled on. Then some fully composted barn mix that had been scratched through by the chickens. Just another wheelbarrow and a bit of the composted mix and they are ready to plant! I think I might try some squash in them.

Other than that I really didn't do too much today. Lots of reading, but not a lot of doing. Oh well, gotta read too!
hugh-gill-progress.gif
The progress I made today
The progress I made today
garter-snake-buddy.jpg
This guy let me get real close before he slithered off
This guy let me get real close before he slithered off
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Today was a big day! The fence is offically done - and that means the goats were released! They were actually very relaxed and leisurely when they walked out of the barn. It was neat to see them all out roaming. The babies got to work smacking their heads together. For Daisy's two daughters it was their first time outdoors as they were born in December of last year. At first they ate like everyone else, but then they started to run around, clearly just having a blast. Jumping over logs, bumping into other goats trying to eat, and smacking heads.

Now that they're out I want to see if I can get a picture of the babies about to butt heads in midair. I've got my DSLR here so I can mess with shutter speeds and all the rest and have fun. I've got very willing subjects, especially since I made all the deliveries while they were still in the barn. They actually approach when they see me coming now, which will make it a whole lot easier to get good photos.

I am also just about done my hugel beds! I put a good layer of the fully composted barn mix on both beds, then I went to down on the nettle and grass to put together a mulch layer. For the first time I actually cut myself with the sickle. Just doing the grab and slice and movement I've been doing for a bit now, but got my pinky. It's a minor cut because I had gloves on, but it's still a reminder to be careful. If I wasn't wearing the gloves I think it would have been worse, as I just sharpened the sickle today. That aside, Hugh and Gill are (just about) ready for planting! Just a couple more handfuls of mulch and I can put some squash seeds in there. So two big projects done today. This will open things up for some new projects to get going.

Oh, and I made a post about how kids these days are not willing to work anymore - that discussion is here.

cuddles_.jpg
The buck and Pearl engaging in some PDA
The buck and Pearl engaging in some PDA
wishaw_.jpg
Wishaw visited me while I was getting mulch for the beds
Wishaw visited me while I was getting mulch for the beds
bundles.jpg
Took the small branches off a dead tree in the garden, now ready for rocket stove
Took the small branches off a dead tree in the garden, now ready for rocket stove
majestic-eh.jpg
The buck on his way to scratch his head on a little tree trunk
The buck on his way to scratch his head on a little tree trunk
 
Posts: 18
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Cam Haslehurst wrote:Today was a big day! The fence is offically done - and that means the goats were released! They were actually very relaxed and leisurely when they walked out of the barn. It was neat to see them all out roaming. The babies got to work smacking their heads together. For Daisy's two daughters it was their first time outdoors as they were born in December of last year. At first they ate like everyone else, but then they started to run around, clearly just having a blast. Jumping over logs, bumping into other goats trying to eat, and smacking heads.

Now that they're out I want to see if I can get a picture of the babies about to butt heads in midair. I've got my DSLR here so I can mess with shutter speeds and all the rest and have fun. I've got very willing subjects, especially since I made all the deliveries while they were still in the barn. They actually approach when they see me coming now, which will make it a whole lot easier to get good photos.

I am also just about done my hugel beds! I put a good layer of the fully composted barn mix on both beds, then I went to down on the nettle and grass to put together a mulch layer. For the first time I actually cut myself with the sickle. Just doing the grab and slice and movement I've been doing for a bit now, but got my pinky. It's a minor cut because I had gloves on, but it's still a reminder to be careful. If I wasn't wearing the gloves I think it would have been worse, as I just sharpened the sickle today. That aside, Hugh and Gill are (just about) ready for planting! Just a couple more handfuls of mulch and I can put some squash seeds in there. So two big projects done today. This will open things up for some new projects to get going.

Oh, and I made a post about how kids these days are not willing to work anymore - that discussion is here.


Hey Cam!  That is so exciting that your hugel beds are almost done.  I've made another sheet mulch in the front yard.  You probably remember how dry it is up there.  So far I've put about 3 hours into it and I'm using leaves from the neighbours yards.  They have been very happy to hand over their big paper bags of leaves to me so I can run them over with the lawn mower and then put them in the mulch.  The paper bags will be able to be reused as well to make more sheet mulches.  Dad and Jamie think I'm a bit nuts but I'm having a ball.  Getting my exercise after school building healthy soil in the front yard.  I'm not sure what we will grow there but my vision is to have all kinds of plants up there (maybe transplant some trees from the backyard, perennial flowers, ferns, and Dad wants to add more berries too.)
 
Lorianne Haslehurst
Posts: 18
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Cam Haslehurst wrote:

Lorianne Haslehurst wrote:
Hey I'm curious about the goat milk. Do you guys drink it as well as having it in yogourt?



Yes you can drink it as milk but I actually don't too much. It's not that I don't like it, I just tend to eat yogurt when I'm hungry and have cold water for a drink. She makes all soft cheese, hard cheese, yogurt, and cream is skimmed off the top of the milk too. Lots of goat dairy around here.

Lorianne Haslehurst wrote:
Oooh I like the look of the green smoke for the mosquitoes!



It works pretty darn well, as long as you've got at least a slight breeze. I know why the bugs don't like it though - it is unpleasant. Most smoke is, but I accidentally took a whole lung's worth of it when I was blowing on the coals and it was nasty. Don't breathe in green smoke if you can avoid it.

Lorianne Haslehurst wrote:
I'll have to look into this stinging nettle. It sounds kind of nasty.  I have no idea what it is right now but your animals sure seem to like it!



I've rubbed my wrists on it a couple times by accident now and it's not pleasant. It's not excruciating by any means, but it's a stinging sensation that sits with you for a little while. I got little white spots where I rubbed it and they stayed there a couple hours. I'm still mysitified as to whether the goats and horses are just badasses or if they have something in their saliva that neutralizes the sting.

I know next to nothing about it but I've heard it has good medicinal properties when made into teas and whatnot, so that's something to look into.

-------

It was cooler today! 18C (64F) was the high today and boy was it refreshing. I only worked up a sweat once, when I was scything out in the sun.

We got the potatoes in today. The process was fairly simple, and it sounds like it's very low maintenance from here on out. We got a bag of seed potatoes from last year, then brought them to the mulched area. We started in the middle and worked our way out at first, but then transitioned to kind of doing row planting. Someone who likes order and organization might have had a fit, but we got them in! For each potato we dug into the hay down to the more composted stuff. Then we put a handful of well-composted barn mix, then potatoes, then more mix, then the hay lightly covered everything. Last year they didn't water the potatoes once, and they still got a great yield.

Yesterday after my midday post I went for a long bike ride around the area, and this place is just beautiful. There's a road that goes right alongside the lake, and with the blue sky blotted with fluffy white clouds it was a sight to see.

Later today I did some more work on the hugel beds. I put a layer of goat manure/hay mix, then scythed a bigger plot and dropped the cuts in as well. I still had extra afterwards so the goats got a bonus snack.



The potatoes sound interesting Cam.  Auntie Lisa said she loves to grow them.  It has been getting crazy cold up here so I've not put any veggies in the garden yet.  Maybe this weekend.  I'm still not sure what we're putting in there.  I'll let you know!
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Lorianne Haslehurst wrote:
Hey Cam!  That is so exciting that your hugel beds are almost done.  I've made another sheet mulch in the front yard.  You probably remember how dry it is up there.  So far I've put about 3 hours into it and I'm using leaves from the neighbours yards.  They have been very happy to hand over their big paper bags of leaves to me so I can run them over with the lawn mower and then put them in the mulch.  The paper bags will be able to be reused as well to make more sheet mulches.  Dad and Jamie think I'm a bit nuts but I'm having a ball.  Getting my exercise after school building healthy soil in the front yard.  I'm not sure what we will grow there but my vision is to have all kinds of plants up there (maybe transplant some trees from the backyard, perennial flowers, ferns, and Dad wants to add more berries too.)



Lol if they think you're nuts I'd list that as a good thing. You're setting the example! It's one thing think 'gee people should really learn to garden' and another entirely to start learning and set the example yourself. I'm excited to see it when I get home!

Lorianne Haslehurst wrote:
The potatoes sound interesting Cam.  Auntie Lisa said she loves to grow them.  It has been getting crazy cold up here so I've not put any veggies in the garden yet.  Maybe this weekend.  I'm still not sure what we're putting in there.  I'll let you know!



Yeah the weather here has been up and down. Some days wearing a sweater and hovering around 10C, then the next day we can have 33C and everyone is sluggish. We're looking forward to some more even weather. I think we're also in a bit of a draught here so water use is down quite a bit as we're on a well. Still lots of rainwater from the catchment and lots in the well, but planning ahead incase it lasts a while. We've had two storms bypass us now with no rain falling here and it looks for the next while it'll just be sunny.  The potatoes should ne all set in the mulched area though, it stays moist deep down for a very long time.

 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Soo I missed two days again. Something I got done yesterday was seeding Hugh and Gill. They both have a bunch of squash seeds in them, but I've got no idea what type of squash. There were three different sizes, but the rest is a mystery. We'll see when they sprout!

Today we moved some electric fence around. Did we both get shocked? Yes. I've touched some of the other fences out of curiosity and they gave me a little zap, but not too bad. Today I touched the fence surrounding the horse paddock and some swear words actually flew out of my mouth. It was quite a shock, and it happened twice while I was trying to thread some twine between the fence and a post - it was like threading the eye of a needle but with higher stakes. Don't touch electric fences if you can avoid it. Or pee on them.

IMG_20210528_171144_436.jpg
Made a new handle excited to try it
Made a new handle excited to try it
robin-eggs.jpg
Saw these in the tool shed
Saw these in the tool shed
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Good productive day so far. The bone crusher is partially complete! All I've gotta do is add a cap to it to keep moisture out of the tube and to give better grip. I stuck the handle on this morning. I did several short welds instead of a couple continuous ones because I didn't want to burn through, and the set up was a little awkward. The welds aren't gorgeous but they will hold. Got a selfie with one of the farm cats while I was working. She was trying to watch me weld and I had to keep moving her away to stop her from blinding herself. She's cute but we think she might have a death wish, and that's why we call her D.W.. I tried to no avail to even out the top of the handle, so I think I need to grind it. Unfortunately last night while I was in the shed working on a handle for a hammer D.W. laid on top of my grinder (it was unplugged, phew) then slipped and knocked it off the shelf, cracking the grinding wheel. So now I need a new grinding wheel. Oh well at least she's cute.

Other than that today has been fairly relaxed. Just lots of little jobs. Took some bark off a post, took apart the old arbor some more, and dug the hole for a post to rebuild another arbor.
professional-welding.jpg
My set up on an old sink with a wood shim - it worked!
My set up on an old sink with a wood shim - it worked!
crusher-progress.jpg
Check it out so far
Check it out so far
dw_compress4.jpg
D.W. took a selfie with me while I was working on the crusher
D.W. took a selfie with me while I was working on the crusher
damn.jpg
If I ever become a hip-hop icon this can be cover art for one of my albums
If I ever become a hip-hop icon this can be cover art for one of my albums
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I did some barnyard repairs today. One of the goat pens has a latch where the little knob/handle kept falling out. First I tried to see if a 1/4" bolt would just screw into the hole. Nope. I moved from that onto welding. I figured I'd just weld the little piece in place. Flawless plan right? I welded it just fine, just a little tack but it held strong. Unfortunately due to my lack of understanding of how those latches come together, I made things worse. The handle was on, but now it wouldn't even go into the latch - this was my oh shit I gotta fix this moment. I had changed it from a functional but annoying latch to a completely useless latch. So I tried to grind my weld down then pop the pin back out by hammering it....again alright idea but did NOT work. The weld penetrated much deeper than I thought. I mean it means I did a good job welding, but it was impossible to undo without going half way through the bolt. Hmmmm.

So then I decided to cut the handle off, grind it down, and start with another bolt that was in the tool shed. I did just that. Cut and ground it down, then tacked a new bolt in its place. It was actually the most challenging weld I've done to date, because there was very little room for error. If I slipped and the arc moved just a couple millimeters over I'd weld the bolt to the cage and the whole thing would be useless. I did it though! But then the bolt wouldn't slide because of the big weld beads. I ground it down as best I could. Again this was very challenging as there was a small amount of space for my grinding wheel to get in there. At a few points I had to grind with one hand and hold the latch up with the other (don't do this if you've never used a grinder before lol). I got it though! Screwed the whole assembly back on, and we now have a functional latch that shouldn't fall out unless you take a sledge hammer or grinder to it. It doesn't look gorgeous but it works. That might become a slogan of mine.

Other than that today was relaxed and productive. Watched more of the PDC and learned about zones and sectors. I'm keeping a count of the minutes I've watched so I can make sure I'm keeping pace to finish by the end of the summer or earlier.

We did some other smaller stuff too like digging some post holes, collecting some compost and other things I can't remember right now.
broken-latch.jpg
What I started with - notice how it is not in its enclosure...
What I started with - notice how it is not in its enclosure...
welded.jpg
"Great, nice job!" I thought - then tried to put it back in the enclosure it wouldn't fit. Duh. Then proceeded to do lots of grinding.
"Great, nice job!" I thought. Then I tried to put it back in the enclosure...back to the drawing board
new-bolt-weld.jpg
Putting the new handle on - nice and long with a comfy round end to it!
Putting the new handle on - nice and long with a comfy round end to it!
installed.jpg
Welded, ground down, and reinstalled. Looks like I recovered after all
Welded, ground down, and reinstalled. Looks like I recovered after all
 
Posts: 6
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Cam.  We just got back from our cottage at Lake Talon.  I just spend the last few minutes reading your posts and looking at the creative  things you are doing. Your posts are so well written and I enjoy the bits of humour along the way.
When you say "we started by preparing ..." who is we?  Are you working alongside other people? Do they live on the homestead as well?
It seems as if you have a new plan almost every day creating something new or newly-repaired using whatever is handy.
I am interested  to know if you ever did create bone meal.   ( I thought bone meal came in a box that you buy at a gardening outlet. ) We planted some cherry tomato plants at the cottage and added bone meal to the soil.
How long do you plan to live at this place?
Keep up the posts and pictures.  They're very enjoyable.
Grandma J.
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mary Ann Jones wrote:
Hi Cam.  We just got back from our cottage at Lake Talon.  I just spend the last few minutes reading your posts and looking at the creative  things you are doing. Your posts are so well written and I enjoy the bits of humour along the way.
When you say "we started by preparing ..." who is we?  Are you working alongside other people? Do they live on the homestead as well?
It seems as if you have a new plan almost every day creating something new or newly-repaired using whatever is handy.
I am interested  to know if you ever did create bone meal.   ( I thought bone meal came in a box that you buy at a gardening outlet. ) We planted some cherry tomato plants at the cottage and added bone meal to the soil.
How long do you plan to live at this place?
Keep up the posts and pictures.  They're very enjoyable.
Grandma J.



I'm glad you like them! And it is me, Kate (she's on permies as well)  and another middle aged guy who has been here several years. So we can either mean Kate and I, me and the other guy (he likes his privacy that's why I'm not naming him), or all three of us. So that's the gang here.

Yes there is lots to do here. The fence is done now, so we're onto more gardening related jobs. Today I was bringing some well composted barn mix over to the garden to fill up some beds and to cover some roots that had been exposed during fence construction . I also fed the goats some dandelions which they very much enjoyed.

I did make some bone meal before I left town, and I posted about it. It was a pretty energy intensive way to do it but it worked. The way Kate does it is by boiling the bones in a big pot over a fire either outside in the summer or on the woodstove in the winter. After boiling she gets all the bones in a big bowl and crushes them. I'm in the midst of making her a tool that'll make it easier to crush the bones after they've been boiled. I posted about that too.

I hope your tomato plants do well! With the bone meal they should be very happy. And I will be here until the end of August.

Thread about bone crusher tool

Thread about bone meal I made


 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Forgot to add these to my last post - got some cute pics of the goats in the grass today.
goat-amongst-grass.jpg
Yum
Yum
bliss.jpg
I aspire to reach the level of contentment that this goat was experiencing
I aspire to reach the level of contentment that this goat was experiencing
mom-and-kid.jpg
Mom and the kid relaxing after a long day of browsing
Mom and the kid relaxing after a long day of browsing
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Short post because we just finished a movie and my eyes are tired of staring at screens. I took some photos today! Some on my phone, and some later on my dslr. I'll upload the phone ones here and the dslr ones later I think. I also planted one of the big hugel beds with zucchini and squash seedlings. Hope they take well!
crushin-.jpg
The tool isn't officially done yet but we needed it today
The tool isn't officially done yet but we needed it today
small-pieces.jpg
It works!
It works!
lavender.jpg
Looking and smelling pretty nice
Looking and smelling pretty nice
up-close.jpg
Trying out the macro mode on my phone
Trying out the macro mode on my phone
another-up-close.jpg
Another macro
Another macro
getting-some-nectar.jpg
This one is very neat I think
This one is very neat I think
planted.jpg
The big bed is planted
The big bed is planted
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So it has been a busy past couple days around here. First, there is a new dog! Her name is Curragh ("cur-uh") and she's a Great Pyrenees mixed with something else. So far so good. She is friendly with all the farm animals. Her one quirk is that she very much enjoys eating goat poop...I'm trying to get her off it because it's not a great habit. Good little dog though, and very cute.

I also learned to throw knives yesterday. I started on some smaller blades which were hard to stick, not only because I'm a beginner but because they were a bit dull. We got some bigger blades out with a better edge on them, and I was able to stick a few of them. That sure is a bad ass skill. Even just holding those knives makes you feel pretty cool.

Finally, we found a baby raccoon outside the barn during chores today. We heard some squeaking near the truck and we saw it sauntering around. It was very young, and clearly not in a great spot because from what I've learned they don't leave the den until they're older unless something goes wrong. So where was the mom? This is the sad part. For about a week we had a creature breaking into the chicken coop. It stole a lot of eggs, and killed two chickens. We were thinking it might be a fisher or weasel, but what we ended up catching in the live trap was a young raccoon. She was shot, and I buried her shortly after (there is little time right now for learning to skin and butcher as we have lots of planting to do). We are in a farming community, so dropping her off somewhere else would have set her on someone else's barn.  That was a couple days ago, and it was only today that we found the baby. We now think the raccoon I buried was the mother of the baby unfortunately. The baby got brought to a sanctuary today, and by the sounds of it will be accepted into a new litter as it is still so young. So it should end up living a good life. Still sad though.

Finally I got some photos with my DSLR. The files are huge so I'm only going to put one up, but I like it.

cutie.jpg
Exploring the garden
Exploring the garden
milking.jpg
Observing the goat being milked around the corner - very calm even when one goat was not calm around her!
Observing the goat being milked around the corner - very calm even when one goat was not calm around her!
baby-raccoon.jpg
Getting some goat milk
Getting some goat milk
snacking.jpg
The goats grazing away in the marsh
The goats grazing away in the marsh
 
pollinator
Posts: 594
Location: Vancouver Island, BC, Canada
233
dog
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes, it is wildlife baby season...

It would be highly unlikely there is only one baby raccoon, you need to look around and keep your ears open for the rest - they have as many as eight (commonly 3-6) and can survive a long time when they lose Mum; I've rescued live kits two weeks after Mum was trapped or shot.

IF you ever find orphan wildlife, feeding them is often the worst thing you can do, especially if dehydrated or emaciated. I get it, it seems counter intuitive, but unless hydrated they are unable to process food or milk (NEVER feed a wild orphan cow milk!!!). Even goat milk (which could be used in an emergency) will cause the creatures body to pull fluids from critical organs in an attempt to process what is now in their gut, this is why it can do serious harm, and even lead to death. Electrolytes MUST be given to any dehydrated or emaciated creature BEFORE very slowly (over several days) weaning onto appropriate formula.

Please, do not think or feel I am chastising or criticizing you, that is absolutely NOT my intent. I just want to offer the best protocols for ANYONE who finds themselves in this situation; an orphan with a KNOWN dead or relocated Mum (fawn, raccoon, squirrel...any mammal).

To continue, this is the time of year Raccoons move their kits from the nursery den. Often this means they must spend a night alone, "parked" as the travel distance is to great for Mum to complete the move in one day. She WILL return for them within 24 hrs - unless she is harmed or killed during this risky time.

If worried, confine them in a large rubbermaid type tote until evening and place in a cool, dark location until nightfall. Cut a large hole in the lid, about 8 inches round, in the center and place the lid on it; or in the bottom and turn upside down.  Alternatively, a clean garbage can, or other tall but unclimbable container, with access for Mum around two feet high.  This will keep them contained, but Mum can still easily retrieve them. Return the tote to the EXACT same location they were found so she is able to locate them.

A kit in distress will be dirty; mucky eyes, debris in fur. They may have sunken eyes, and their skin will "tent"; when pulled up at the shoulder blades it will not sna back, but rather slowly recede or stay up in a ridge or wrinkle. THESE signs indicate a baby in distress.  Keep it warm and offer pedialyte or other hydration fluids, and contact your vet, local police, or animal control if you do not know who does wildlife rehab in your area.

THANK YOU so much for rescuing this wee one, getting the kit into care, with experienced rehabbers, and knowing where to access that care promptly.  You saved a life!
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So Curragh now has a new respect for goats. Daisy, the mixed breed, has had it out for her from the beginning. The other goats have kept an eye on Curragh, but they weren't aggressive. Daisy wasn't until last night. Chores were different from usual because of the extreme heat (we peaked at 40C today). As a result Daisy was out on her own after she refused to go back in her pen. When I went out with Curragh to close a gate, Daisy was there and watching Curragh very intensely. I was mostly keeping myself between them, but then I turned my back to work with the gate, and I heard a squeal and felt Curragh bump into me as she jumped back from Daisy. Daisy had given her a good old headbutt. Curragh is totally fine, but now she gives the goats, even the babies, a wide berth. Daisy is still watching her like a hawk though.

In other news, Gill has babies! I counted four sprouts popping up, and I think more are on their way.

The rest of today was spent cutting comfrey and tying it up to dry. It's a little prickly but not too bad to handle. I learned a surgical knot too. It's good to hold its tension while you tie the second one to finish the knot. Once the comfrey is dried it's all set to be winter feed for the goats which I've heard they like.

I also did some laundry by hand yesterday. Curragh whizzed on my sheets yesterday morning when she ran in overexcited, so I washed them later. I got a 5 gallon bucket, got some rainwater from the barrels, and put a bit of vinegar in the mix too. Then I put one sheet at a time in and did the whole wash cycle. Then I wrung them out as best I could, and hung them on the supports for the grapevines. They dried quickly in the high heat. They also smell great now too from the lavender in the garden and that generally pleasant outdoor smell.
Gills-babies.gif
Houston, we have sprouts
Houston, we have sprouts
garden.jpg
Exploring the garden
Exploring the garden
 
Posts: 137
Location: Zone 4b Ontario, Canada
36
goat medical herbs wood heat homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Good Morning Lorinne.

Happy to say the kit is fine and good hands at a local sanctuary.   "She" has been placed with a group of about the same age (4 to 5 weeks old).  

We found her screaming in the wide open lane in front of the barn, having come out of the nearby bush.  She was in full sun and in harms way of the homestead livestock.  So, considering the situation, we acted quickly working with what we had at hand.

The sanctuary said the goat's milk did her no harm, as she took only enough to settle her down till she could be transported to the sanctuary.  

Thanks for the advice, that has been duly noted for any future situations.

Cheers!  K
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Lorinne Anderson wrote:Yes, it is wildlife baby season...

It would be highly unlikely there is only one baby raccoon, you need to look around and keep your ears open for the rest - they have as many as eight (commonly 3-6) and can survive a long time when they lose Mum; I've rescued live kits two weeks after Mum was trapped or shot.

IF you ever find orphan wildlife, feeding them is often the worst thing you can do, especially if dehydrated or emaciated. I get it, it seems counter intuitive, but unless hydrated they are unable to process food or milk (NEVER feed a wild orphan cow milk!!!). Even goat milk (which could be used in an emergency) will cause the creatures body to pull fluids from critical organs in an attempt to process what is now in their gut, this is why it can do serious harm, and even lead to death. Electrolytes MUST be given to any dehydrated or emaciated creature BEFORE very slowly (over several days) weaning onto appropriate formula.

Please, do not think or feel I am chastising or criticizing you, that is absolutely NOT my intent. I just want to offer the best protocols for ANYONE who finds themselves in this situation; an orphan with a KNOWN dead or relocated Mum (fawn, raccoon, squirrel...any mammal).

To continue, this is the time of year Raccoons move their kits from the nursery den. Often this means they must spend a night alone, "parked" as the travel distance is to great for Mum to complete the move in one day. She WILL return for them within 24 hrs - unless she is harmed or killed during this risky time.

If worried, confine them in a large rubbermaid type tote until evening and place in a cool, dark location until nightfall. Cut a large hole in the lid, about 8 inches round, in the center and place the lid on it; or in the bottom and turn upside down.  Alternatively, a clean garbage can, or other tall but unclimbable container, with access for Mum around two feet high.  This will keep them contained, but Mum can still easily retrieve them. Return the tote to the EXACT same location they were found so she is able to locate them.

A kit in distress will be dirty; mucky eyes, debris in fur. They may have sunken eyes, and their skin will "tent"; when pulled up at the shoulder blades it will not sna back, but rather slowly recede or stay up in a ridge or wrinkle. THESE signs indicate a baby in distress.  Keep it warm and offer pedialyte or other hydration fluids, and contact your vet, local police, or animal control if you do not know who does wildlife rehab in your area.

THANK YOU so much for rescuing this wee one, getting the kit into care, with experienced rehabbers, and knowing where to access that care promptly.  You saved a life!



Hey Lorinne just read this today. Thank you for the advice! I will put it into practice if or when I experience something like this again.
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Rain!! After a long while of very dry weather we got a huge dumping of rain today. Normally the goats don't like the rain and run inside the barn as soon as it begins. But today they were so warm they stayed out in it until it started to really pour. We actually have a couple trees down. Lots of rain and wind came by.

Other than that, I just did a few small jobs. Brought some barn compost up, put a shelf up, and deactivated a live trap in one of the fields further down the property.
rain.jpg
[Thumbnail for rain.jpg]
That is not fog that is rain
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Another good day down. Today I tried out my finished bone/eggshell crusher to see how it works. It works very well! I went from bones to a crumbly powder in about half an hour. More details are here.

I also hit a milestone in the Geoff Lawton PDC - I'm over 25% done! Or specifically 1097 minutes watched of 4320 (72 hours). The last lectures have been on how trees fit into permaculture systems and they were very neat. It reminded me of multiple books I want to read. One called The Overstory, one called The Understory, and Mycelium Running. I already have too many books on the go though so those will have to wait.

We did some more comfrey cutting and tying today. I learned that I need to do a slipknot on the bundles so they don't fall out of the knot when they dry and shrink in size.

We also did some trimming of the lilac tree. We took a bunch of dead branches off that were creating too much shade, and tossed the smaller parts over the fence for the goats to nibble on.

The rain we got a couple days ago was a microburst apparently. It got very windy, and some trees came down. One by the hugels was down, so I took the smaller branches off and gave them to the goats.

Oh, and yesterday Curragh was set free in the garden! First she was confused with the leash dragging behind her, but as soon as it clicked , she was off and running. She's actually very good in the garden, at least so far. She's only dug one spot which is good.
crushin.jpg
[Thumbnail for crushin.jpg]
creeper.jpg
Do you ever get the feeling that you're being watched?
Do you ever get the feeling that you're being watched?
this-is-just-cute.jpg
Aww
Aww
tree-down.jpg
[Thumbnail for tree-down.jpg]
pocket-boy.jpg
Very nice folding saw I used on the lilac and on the fallen tree
Very nice folding saw I used on the lilac and on the fallen tree
 
Cam Haslehurst
pollinator
Posts: 157
Location: Stone Baerm Permaculture Homestead
86
goat dog gear books bike building
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lots of physical work today. I am going to sleep very well tonight.

The first big task was dealing with a fallen poplar tree that came down during the microburst a few days ago. It's a good size tree - at it's largest the trunk is a little over a foot in diameter. It fell on top of the fence by the road, so we need to take it off and get the fence back up. Today we took all the foliage off and stuffed it in the back of the truck, and brought it to the goats to munch on. It was a feast! Then I went back to get some logs. It's much clearer now, but there is still work to do. And to all you city folks who buy trucks just to drive around alone with the bed empty - look at the photos. THIS is what trucks were made for!! That's a pet peeve of mine.

Following that I rested and watched some more of the PDC. Now I'm onto working with water -  learning about dams right now, and I'm sure water catchment is coming up.

I had a shitty evening...literally. I mucked out a stall in the barn for the first time. Basically clearing the litter out right down to the wood floor, then putting a thin layer of dry stuff down so the goats have something to lay on as wood isn't very comfy. For anyone who has mucked out a barn, you know the smell. But if you haven't...it's pungent. There's a strong odour of ammonia, plus a sulfur-like scent which it turns out is hydrogen sulfide. It's definitely something you want good ventilation for. Thankfully the breeze tonight was clearing stuff out just fine. Five more stalls to go!

Tonight's dinner was great, especially after the physical work today. There was sweet potato, steamed veggies, ribs and sausage rolls for dinner. For dessert I had some toffee pudding cake with 100% goat whipped cream whipped up today. Mmm-mm was that ever good. I also just had some cheesecake with more of the whipped cream. Mmm.

caught-you.jpg
I snuck up on her for this one and you can tell
I snuck up on her for this one and you can tell
think-shes-happy.jpg
The Weed-Eater 3000 at work
The Weed-Eater 3000 at work
comfrey.jpg
Did some more comfrey hanging today - almost done
Did some more comfrey hanging today - almost done
poplar.jpg
Now that's how a truck should be used
Now that's how a truck should be used
starting.jpg
Mostly full stall
Mostly full stall
clear.jpg
All clear down to the wood - just added some straw and it was all set
All clear down to the wood - just added some straw and it was all set
 
Lorianne Haslehurst
Posts: 18
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Those are beautiful eggs Cam.  Do you know what kind of bird will hatch from them?
 
Lorianne Haslehurst
Posts: 18
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I love the picture of you looking in the hole.  You look kind of ominous.  Not really who you are but great for a hip-hop album cover!
 
Lorianne Haslehurst
Posts: 18
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I love your new dog.  She looks very happy in her new home.
 
Why should I lose weight? They make bigger overalls. And they sure don't make overalls for tiny ads:
Solar Dehydrator Plans - Combo Package download
https://permies.com/t/solar-dehydrator
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic