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How do you "Eat seasonally" in a cold climate?

 
Posts: 22
Location: AZ
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I think it is harder in cold climate to see seasonally then warm climate. But if you store your food in cans or freeze it through the year I would say that would be fine too. I think because we import so much food that we lost the whole season food.  I do think that if you can eat as much as you can of your own grow food and or local farm foods the better and healthier you will be. Depending on your location you will be eating different things. as an example I live in 10A I grow lettuce and swiss chard and all my greens from sept-may. so my growing season is much different then someone in say zone 5 that eats and grows greens from april-august. but you can also go by fruit trees. They tell you when to pick them each year.
Mulberrries are April and may
Oranges are oct-Feb
poms are sept-oct

something like that. Also there are great benefits in health eating this way. each fruit of veggie has what you need for that time. Oranges come out in the fall right when you need vitamin C, berries come out in the summer when you need antioxidants. The problem is we have gone so far away from nature as a nation that we have lost all of this and gone to processed foods that are not healthy.

I personally only eat fruits and veggies I did this for health my family was sick for a long time and this changed our lives from going to the doctors, Er and clinics to never having to go to the doctors no pills and health. We did this 3 years ago and never looked back. I will say food is much more expensive but there is no doctors bills that have drained our saves. hopefully the young fruit trees  and vines we planted 2 years ago will grow big and will feed us. till then I buy local fruit and grow most of my veggies. It has been a long road but it has been worth it.

To all the Permies out there if your not able to eat the fruit you grow please message me what you have. I love unique stuff.
stay health all and eat whatyou grow.
 
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Location: Madison, WI
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So many good thoughts about what eating seasonally could/should mean. I first read about it from John Douillard and his original blog posts regarding it have expanded the topic as he digs deeper. He does a lot of mapping of recent scientific study results to ayurvedic practice. Here is a link to a 2019 blog post: https://lifespa.com/seasonal-living-original-biohack/

I am sure there are many other posts regarding seasonal eating if you search the history. Also seasonal eating food lists and such available for free download....
 
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Location: North Central Kentucky
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Ben Zumeta wrote:Cold climates generally have led to cultures of meat eating, smoking, fermentation and other preservation methods. Animals with thick fur and fat layers are how ecosystems store energy through winter, and humans in cold climates have cultures that utilize this.

I think a great example of the benefits to the consumer of a seasonal diet lies in how tomatoes grown in the sun in their natural season produce 350 or so phytochemicals and flavor/aroma compounds, whereas those grown in greenhouses without full spectrum sunlight (due to glass or plastic filtering out much of the spectrum) produce only 50 or so. This leads to less flavor in greenhouse grown tomatoes, as well as inferior nutrition, and what is there is not as appropriate for what the human consumer needs for that time of year. Many of the 300+ chemicals produced only by tomatoes in full sun are for protecting the plant from the full spectrum of light and helping it make use of it. Many of these sun-grown tomato produced chemicals are also used by our bodies to help us tolerate and benefit from that same full spectrum of sunlight when we are out in the sun at the time of year we are meant to eat tomatoes. This is also similar to how medicinal plants produce more complex and complete medicinal compounds in full sun.

For these reasons along with thalate contamination and plastic pollution, I only grow seedlings/starts or overwintering tropical perennials under plastic or any kind covering. I also avoid soft plastics that leach known carcinogens and hormone disruptors, and only last a few years before becoming more microplastic trash. Full sun is the only way to fully actualize a plant's potential nutrition in my fairly well researched opinion. I could provide the citations, but it would be just as easy for anyone to do a basic search of the abundant literature and decide for themselves.



I'm extremely interested in this phytochemical difference in greenhouse vs outdoor grown tomatoes.  Do you have any links to information on this?
 
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