paul has a new video  

 



visit the thread.

see the DVDs.

  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

the most eco and last coffee maker - cowgirl coffee  RSS feed

 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
Posts: 3737
Location: Vermont, off grid for 24 years!
87
bee books chicken dog duck fungi solar trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Emma Fredsdotter wrote:What "sustainable" coffee making/filtering system would you recommend to someone who just cannot stand lots of coffee tannins?


Have you tried the cold brew method? I use cold brew with my french press. I do not put it in the fridge, since I also don't have one ATM, just leave it on the counter over night. 1 tbsp for 6 oz (170g) water.


Also, this maybe sacrilege but my husband often uses Taster's Choice because it's easier on his stomach. It's good, just different than brewed.
 
David Kim
Posts: 4
Location: Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I use a cotton sock filter for my coffee. You can buy those at any farmer's market around here. They're incredibly cheap (about 4 Reais, or 2,5 Dollars) and I probably don't take as much energy to produce as metal strainers. You can even make one yourself with a piece of metal wire and some cotton fabric (mine was like good T-shirt fabric when I bought it). It makes the best tasting coffee, because you never use any soap to wash it (want something greener than not using soap?). Just rinse and squeeze the excess water, then let it sun-dry. Over time, it will become stained with the oils setting on it, and they'll give coffee a more complex taste. If it's for domestic use, you won't have to worry about bacteria, just like you don't worry about wood spoons. Just soak it in some baking soda once in a while.
As for coffee brewing, I also take time on it. Instead of one big pour of water, I'll get the grounds just wet the first time, then pour some more water and wait, and repeat it. That way I'll get a richer and stronger coffee, fitting to our Brazilian palate.
 
Dave Bennett
Posts: 686
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A reusable filter could be made with extra fine cheesecloth too.
 
Billy Dengel
Posts: 6
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Tom Haile wrote:paul wheaton here's a pic



Here's a pic of coffee grounds in a Ball jar filled with water. It's that simple then it sits in the frig. After a day I use a fine metal strainer to strain off a cup. I make sure to start another batch before I run out. Since I already use my frig there's no extra energy costs and it takes 1.5 minutes to make.

I was inspired to do a simple blog post on it. Cheap Simple Coffee Brewing.



I wonder if you could cut out something like a screen door or window screen and swap it out with the lid when wanting to strain it? Just put it down and screw on the rim. Or some variation of a screen and lid. That's what I would do.
 
paul wheaton
master steward
Posts: 22636
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
bee chicken hugelkultur trees wofati woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Chaya Foedus wrote:Paul,

Hmmm, I feel a challenge...your system uses what you have around the household, to be sure. You can't really beat that. But is it good coffee? And before someone runs out to get the things they might need, might they consider http://pantryparatus.com/kitchen-tools/kitchen-hardware/percolator.html? Paul--I DARE you--if you so choose to accept my challenge. I'll send you a percolator free for your review.

--Chaya
Pantry Paratus


I very much enjoy getting gifts - it is now one of my favorite parts of being semi-famous. At the same time I am trying to find paths to have all the delicious of life and with less stuff.

When I was 20 I had a percolator and I like the taste of that coffee, but I think it makes my innards sad. Plus, I have this tendancy to forget stuff on the stove (I get to concentrating too much on other things). So my current system has a super energy efficient kettle that turns off the moment the water boils combined with something that will do nothing more than get cold if I forget.

saving energy is another big part for me.





 
R Scott
Posts: 3363
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
32
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Billy Dengel wrote:
Tom Haile wrote:paul wheaton here's a pic



Here's a pic of coffee grounds in a Ball jar filled with water. It's that simple then it sits in the frig. After a day I use a fine metal strainer to strain off a cup. I make sure to start another batch before I run out. Since I already use my frig there's no extra energy costs and it takes 1.5 minutes to make.

I was inspired to do a simple blog post on it. Cheap Simple Coffee Brewing.



I wonder if you could cut out something like a screen door or window screen and swap it out with the lid when wanting to strain it? Just put it down and screw on the rim. Or some variation of a screen and lid. That's what I would do.


Like a sprouting lid. More stacking!

I have an Aeropress. Great coffee but plastic and paper filters. It lives at work. At home I use a stainless Bialetta. $3 at goodwill. Awesome
 
Louis Schwitzer
Posts: 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm using a stainless steel percolator from Bass Pro. We have a Kuerig, as well, which is might convenient. I'm trying to learn ways to cut cost without cutting luxury; using the percolator helps.
 
Christian McMahon
Posts: 72
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I picked up a coffee maker like this one at a garage sale for .25 cents. It doesn't need a filter and does a great job at making a good cup of coffee. You can choose how long to perk the coffee so you get a result you like.
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
289
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Speaking of multi-functioning of items, that Pyrex measuring cup (large: 4 cup/1qt/liter) has another useful function:

Emergency lighting. When power is out, put a candle in it (one a little shorter than the top rim). Keeps wind from putting out the flame. Stable platform, and if the candle falls over, there is no fire risk. The flame shines through the clear sides. And it has a convenient carrying handle.

 
christopher in belize
Posts: 2
Location: Belize
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
We use a little espresso pot. I have had it for about 7 years, and, except fot eh gaskets needing replaced, once, it has been trouble free. We also have French presses made of stainless steel, so not breakable!
 
Daniel Morse
Posts: 270
Location: SW Michigan
8
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am a bad person. I am using my grandmas old perk. Just like the 60's again. It makes it fast, looks great and is trouble free. I am sorry. I am too sloppy to do the boil and pour. I forget when I use the french press. I fill and plug in, take a shower and its done. Besides. It reminds of the gracious and kind strong woman she was. She was a farmer and a lot of what you talk about now she was doing 70 years ago.

I love my post war perk coffee maker.
 
leila hamaya
pollinator
Posts: 1159
Location: northern northern california
71
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
i've used the measuring cup (or usually mason jar when i didnt have a glass measuring cup like now) and strainer method many times, and it works great.
even used old tee shirt, cut off piece of window screen.... or other scrap fabric as the strainer in a pinch.

but i do love the french press i have now, i think its the best way.
plus my thermos, i am really attached to my thermos, vacuum sealed.
they make some excellent sturdy metal french presses, those are the best even if they are pricey. some that are also a thermos, which is excellent for the second cup.
i've wanted one of those french press travel mugs forever, i've used my friends and it was excellent. once your coffee is brewed and pressed you can just shut it up tight for a second cup later.

the thing to be aware of is preheating the glass, thats what i have found. particularly with a mason jar, which can break if you pour boiling water into it on a cold morning. but even when its not chilly enough to break it, its good to preheat the jar, measuring cup or even the french press. otherwise the glass take all the heat from the water, and your coffee gets colder quick.

by carefully pouring in a little boiling water and swirling it around so it makes the glass nice and hot, or theres other ways to preheat but thats the simplest.
....as its boiling i pour some in and preheat the glass..... i usually do this a couple of times, which also rinses it out cause its usually still got yesterdays grounds in it.

on measurements, its highly personal depending on your taste. also important is the size of the grind.
i like the smallest grind possible and extra heaping tablespoon per 8 oz cup of water.
with a french press i grind it to "espresso" grind, the smallest, and then use 4 heaping tablespoons of coffee for a whole press.
but i like it strong!
if you like it weaker, grind it with the largest setting...less bitter flavor. i usually only do a grind like this with less quality coffee, it hides some of the burnt and less pleasant flavors of a cheap coffee.
 
Taylor Maxson
Posts: 9
Location: Asheville, NC
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My wife and I like the chemex coffee maker. Not quite as likely to break as a french press. Basically, it's a glass bowl with a cone shaped glass top. We keep a reusable stainless steel coffee filter inside the cone, though I think there is a good argument for using unbleached paper filters from a health perspective, because of cafestol, a molecule in coffee that increases cholesterol in some people.

 
Julia Winter
steward
Posts: 2143
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
194
bee bike chicken food preservation hugelkultur urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm very fond of my stainless steel french press. It's gotten pretty much daily use for 12 years. A couple of years ago the filter plate was wearing out--the silicone that went all around the outside edge was developing breaks. I was able to order a replacement filter/press and it just screwed onto the plunger. I ordered two since it didn't change the shipping costs, and the second one is waiting for its time.

It looks like this:
Bodum 1 Liter SS French Press at Amazon

It's expensive, but it may be the last coffee pot you ever buy. When I ordered the replacement cross plate (that's what it's called--I looked it up) it was less than $10 but now it looks like it is $12. Not to knock the measuring cup and deep filter method--simple is good!

(I have a similar fondness for my Kuhn-Rikon pressure cooker. I have used it heavily for over 12 years, and I just need to replace a couple of small seals in the safety valves every 5 years or so. I am still using the original seal that goes all around the edge of the lid.)
 
Scott Stanley
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not a coffee drinker myself, but I have made plenty of "cowboy" coffee on an open fire in the big huge metal coffee pot sitting right in the coals. Once you figure out how many handfuls of coffee that pot needs (to make the majority happy), let it boil away. Then remove from the fire, and let it stand about 5-10 minutes, then add a big ladle of ice cold water and let it sit a few more minutes..... that cold water makes the grounds fall right to the bottom. After that pour slowly.... seem to work out fine for everyone..... some complained about the strength (to strong/weak), but very seldom did anyone even mention grounds in their cup. For what ist worth, I know this is an old thread. Scott
 
Nick Simcheck
Posts: 57
Location: Southeast Michigan, USA
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Casually late to this thread, qualifies me as an expert. A downright sophisticate expert for that matter...




Drip, Percolator, Aeropress, Chemex, French Press, and straight-up-strained-in-cup... I've done them all. (except an Espresso Machine, talk about a consumerist waste of space for a single purpose when used privately)


Drip involves many parts and a single use machine.

Percolator is similar to above unless you get something like a small Bialetti and dilute the espresso into an "Americano"

Aeropress had great flavor, because the acid stays on top and since it is an upside-down french press the oils remain in grinds after pressing.

Stainless french press is pretty straightforward, however is on the acidic side because the oils float to the top after pressing, you can pour it off... 'but still'

Chemex is downright delicious, is fairly straightforward brewing, but clumsy to clean.

Easiest cleanup is just using a tea strainer, however it leaves a lot desired with flavor and grit.


Now, behold, the supiér, dupiér, fantåstik Pour Ovear This is not much bigger than the tea strainer, is virtually clean-up free (splash of hot water and done) and brews a delish cuppa'Joe.

But wait - There's More!

The cold brew uses multi-functional silca containment tin rimmed things we call Mason Jars. Apparently Free Masons knew how fantastic these things were and decided to let the general public in on the action under the name "Ball Jars" Now whoever was the first one to be castrated and... Sorry, it appears this coffee savant is digressing...

Cold brew has a very unique flavor, it's generally sweeter and definitely less acidic than ANY hot brewing method. Timing and mix ratio dependent, of course. By the way, no refrigeration is necessary, but it will brew slower and sweeter in fridge. I actually brew it in a Quart (32OZ) with it filled 3/4er's worth of horse coarse grinds and let it sit counterside for a day or two depending on lunar/tide phases. Straining it is a pain though, it's a rather slow and tedious operation. Also if you like piping hot coffee, then you have to pre-heat the elixir before pouring in your hot water otherwise it's somewhere between Luke warm and Hansolo hot.


So there, if you want dead nuts simple... I suggest Pour Over as a good all 'rounder. If you want a unique (better is subjective) brew then try cold brewing.




 
Dale Hodgins
gardener
Posts: 6836
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
274
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Paul, Try to drink less coffee. I've heard it'll stunt your growth !!!

When I was thirteen, I had a blister on one hand, but that's another story.

I make only “camp” or “cowboy” coffee. Just boil some water and put the ground coffee in the pan or kettle. If poured slowly, most of the sediment remains in the pan. The floaters give your coffee some body and their abrasive nature cleans the teeth.

After trying several foo foo coffees with fancy Italian names, I've come to the conclusion that coffee is all pretty much the same (just like wine) . I can pay three times as much for the new “Snobica” blend that is prepared by naked monks who sprinkle it with fairy dust and it tastes about the same as the last inch of WalMart coffee left in a giant carafe at the end of a company meeting.
 
Nick Simcheck
Posts: 57
Location: Southeast Michigan, USA
3
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sorry to hear about your defective taste buds Dale. Coffee is second in complexity only to my other dear love, chocolate.

I can't stand to drink crap coffee, I'd rather go without to be honest.
 
Daniel Morse
Posts: 270
Location: SW Michigan
8
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am such a slob. I had no idea there were soooooo many ways to brew a cup.

By the way,... My buddy the "The Evil John" my oldest friend, just bought a brand new perk that has a glass top. So you can see the perk. Just like in the old days. Its funny. I have been complaining about this and washing machines needing a second rinse cycle. Its true. I have an appliance fetish, sick as it is. I swear the appliance fairy was listening. He told me he bought it for 40 at the wallmartplaceinhell.

Mine was made in America before I was born. Funny. I remember going to a jewelry shop with the parents and buying a toaster and such back in the 70's. How the world has changed.
 
Nick Simcheck
Posts: 57
Location: Southeast Michigan, USA
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Daniel, you find me a can opener worth a $@%# you let me know ok!

I have a "small appliance" fetish, I have my eyes on a Vollrath 'King Kutter' which I used when I was a kid with my grand mother, it makes pathetic plastic julienners weak in the knees.

I'm still on the search for the best hand-powered burr grinder, everything is such an antique that it's either ready to fall apart or is clumsy in operation. Just need to find the right one...

A Mother Earth article (apoligies if links are not allowed) :

http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/choosing-a-grain-mill-zm0z04djzkin.aspx
 
Marcella Rose
Posts: 95
Location: Central Texas, it is dry here.
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
First of all, Paul, may I just say that you are genius and secondly may I say, "DUH" We have been doing tea like this for a long time, I feel stupid that we have not done this with coffee. If something happens to the French Press, we will switch to this. Thank you, thank you, thank you!
 
Jeff McLeod
Posts: 95
Location: New Hampshire
2
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have to ask - what are you all doing with your french presses? We've had the same one for the last 10 years. Always makes a great cup of coffee and nothing to replace. not to mention once we are done we can tip the grinds straight into the compost bucket.
 
laura sharpe
Posts: 244
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
my great gramma owned only one coffee pot in her lifetime. She made egg coffee...hers was very strong

here is the recipe http://voices.yahoo.com/egg-drop-coffee-old-fashioned-way-coffee-215477.html

here is the pot http://www.amazon.com/Granite-Ware-6006-1-3-Quart-Coffee/dp/B000RA3Z0K/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1354277262&sr=8-4&keywords=camp+coffee+pot

as far as cold brewed coffee...delicious but best served as cold coffee, when you heat it up you loss the esters in the coffee.
 
Jon Kennedy
Posts: 26
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lol. I love this site, its brutal and honest, yet relaxing and informative, besides ive never laughed so much. (not at any one more than myself)
What a great group of interesting people and problem solvers!
Love the ideas and knowledge that is shared.

 
laura sharpe
Posts: 244
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
McLeod Jeff wrote: I have to ask - what are you all doing with your french presses? We've had the same one for the last 10 years. Always makes a great cup of coffee and nothing to replace. not to mention once we are done we can tip the grinds straight into the compost bucket.


I believe the quality of glass in most french presses is not good. With the wrong glass the repeated exposure to high temperatures makes it brittle. I had the same problem with my french presses and i knew the problem before i bought my first one. But what i didnt know is how to avoid those products.

as soon as i posted i thought pyrex...found one:

http://www.amazon.com/oz-Pyrex-Glass-Coffee-Press/dp/B000HZH1LY
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
289
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
They also offer a larger size:
25 ounce Pyrex
 
Rudy Mallonee
Posts: 9
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
OK Paul !

Keep it as simple as possile for a good cup of coffee... The Costa Ricans -"Ticos" have been brewing their morning coffee for generations like this -- same stand as Fred Morgan demostrates in his reply... except the Ticos use a fine cloth bag and your cup goes under the bag instead of the steel cup... Just rinse the bag afer each use and it will last for many a cup... I've used it for years. "El chorreador de cafe"

Easy to make one or buy over the internet... No special cloth is needed, just a tight weave.. with a piece of stainless wire a little bigger than the hole in the stand.. Put the coffe in the bag to strength you want and pour hot water through.. A good flavored coffee ! wood part is simple...
coffee-maker.jpg
[Thumbnail for coffee-maker.jpg]
 
wayne stephen
steward
Posts: 1793
Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
104
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Caffeine is water soluable and comes out quickly in the brew. Espresso is the best method for those who want less tannins . The longer the water is in contact with the bean the more tannin. I admit I am a decrepit junkie , there is more in the bean that I crave . I have created a 'total brew' method that works great.
I use a paper cone filter- wasteful but I compost them- and put in more than the recommended amount per serving. I pour over the bean just enough boiling water to moisten the grind. Then I allow it to sit wet for 15 minutes or so and then pour more boiling water over to finish the brew. The joe is very rich , smooth , and provides a wake up call .
 
Pj Maddox
Posts: 14
Location: Middle Georgia
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I finally got rid of all the electric pots, and use the kind of pot I grew up with.

The old 4 piece metal Drip Coffee Pot. If you are young you may not know what it looks like,
It has a Base (the Pot) a cup (for the ground coffee) with lots of tiny holes, that firs on top of the pot.
Then it has a tall cylinder that fits on top of that, (for the water) It also has tiny holes, but not as many,
for a gentle flow. and a lid to cover it all. You heat the water, pour it into the top and let it drip through
the coffee, giving it time to clear the coffee. There are two types: aluminum, or metal coated with spackle
(like "Granny Ware") They still make the best coffee, in your house, or over a camp fire.
Go back to the old ways.
 
Dave Quinn
Posts: 87
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't drink much coffee but when I make fresh I use one of these it was £4.00 from TK Max!



It makes a really strong expresso.
 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
Posts: 3737
Location: Vermont, off grid for 24 years!
87
bee books chicken dog duck fungi solar trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The newest versions of these espresso makers have handles that melt, at least on my stove (a commercial Garland). If I wrap the handle in tin foil, or put the flame down really low it'll work. I admit though, I've had similar trouble with teapots that have melt-able plastic in places me and my stove find. I'm pretty sure I managed to melt a part meant to whistle. Maybe it wouldn't happen with an electric stove?
 
Dave Turpin
Posts: 112
Location: Groton, CT
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't have anything to add for coffee, except that you should know that the blisters discussed in this thread are not necessarily caused by an excessive consumption of caffeine.

The blisters are a disease called Dyshidrotic Eczema, which is an allergic reaction. The OP is probably allergic to Caffeine. MOST people, however, will not get blisters no matter how much coffee they drink. Personally I drink about 6 cups a day, and have been drinking coffee since I was 6. (IMHO, coffee is not GREAT for kids, but it sure beats soda!) My wife gets severe hives and sometimes Eczema from wintergreen.

 
Sherry Jansen
Posts: 59
Location: Southern MN
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I got a French press after my 6th electric coffee maker burned out.

And my philosophy is I would rather have 10 French presses than ever buy another electric pot. Not one of the 4 presses have ever disappointed me.

Now my biggest problem is figuring out how to grow my coffee beans and then roasting them. Tried roasting on the Woodstove but man is that smoking up the house.
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
289
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you want to grow your own beans, you'll need to move 'a few counties' south.

As far as roasting your own, I met a guy who used one of those cheap popcorn machines.
He had the kind with a paddle that rotated, and lifted the kernels off of the bottom each turn.
He swore by it. Cost him a couple bucks at a garage sale.

 
tim Jeandrevin
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Kim Bozarth wrote: It was way too strong?

That's like having too much firewood stacked and split! lol
 
Mabel Green
Posts: 6
Location: Australia
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I just listened to the podcast addressing this issue and had to join up here just to share the solution I found a while ago now.. (please excuse the bad photo!)

[/url]

The Grumpy One broke the glass on his french press - and when I saw this, I just had to have it. I'm loving how so many people here are admitting to breaking the glass too. He thought he was the only one, but he'll only grunt if I direct him to this post to prove otherwise - it won't make him feel better.

I do love the smell of a good coffee, it's just the taste that makes me go BLERGH!

We don't expect we'll need to ever buy another one. Oh, it's double-walled to keep the coffee hot for longer.
 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Posts: 3433
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
209
chicken dog food preservation forest garden fungi tiny house toxin-ectomy trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mabel, is that an all stainless steel French press?
 
Mabel Green
Posts: 6
Location: Australia
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Adrien Lapointe wrote:Mabel, is that an all stainless steel French press?

Yes Adrien.
 
Zach Whisen
Posts: 15
Location: eastern CT
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Fred Morgan:
This is how it is done here



Very simple, makes a great cup.

My method is a espresso machine, but with more water - makes one really good cup - 3 minutes tops. I barely can keep ahead of it while putting milk in my cup, sugar, etc. Of course, just a metal basket, so no nasty filters, etc.

If I want foamy milk, I put the milk in the cup, cup in microwave for 30 seconds, then I used a whisk spun between my hands to foam it up - no need to mess around with the steam, which then has to be cleaned.



I've done this underway when the coffee on the ship was nasty. Coffee is the life blood of the Navy. The HT shop always had good coffee because we did ours the same way. the cold coffee was another one we did for the boiler watch way too hot (140degf) on the boiler front for hot coffee!
 
Jane Reed
Posts: 70
Location: Fair Play, Northern California
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
PJ, I agree with you, the metal drip pot is, by far, my favorite coffee brewing method. And I have such a pot. However, since I drink only 1 or 2 cups a day, and I live alone, it's perfectly ridiculous to dirty coffee makers for such a small output. So, I end up using the aeropress or else the tea method (grounds in a pyrex measuring cup, hot water over, let rest for 3 minutes, pour through paper filter). The cold press method I tried many years ago but never could get used to the flavor.
 
The City calls upon her steadfast protectors. Now for a tiny ad:
Permaculture Playing Cards by Paul Wheaton and Alexander Ojeda
https://permies.com/wiki/57503/digital-market/digital-market/Permaculture-Playing-Cards-Paul-Wheaton
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!