• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • jordan barton
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Leigh Tate
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • r ranson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Greg Martin
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Jay Angler
gardeners:
  • Nancy Reading
  • Mike Barkley
  • Christopher Shepherd

How do you store your left overs?

 
Posts: 11
Location: Denver, CO
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Bachelor member of Tuperware Team checking in -- namely those red, snap-together Easy Find lids.  I've purchased 2-3 "sets" of those plus extra 2c boxes, and right now I have 4 bowls (2c) and 2 mugs (1.25c) of frozen soup in my freezer.

I don't like the idea of disposable plastic either, but so long as the boxes don't get a gravity assist, they're fine.  I've lost two in the last five years, and they get regular workouts from freezer storage to daily lunchbox organization.

I will use ziplocks when freezing meat.  I use plastic grocery veggie bags, but I make a point to stuff them in my grocery pack and reuse them several times.  I'm nowhere near the 173 reuses of a cloth bag for the material breakeven, but I'm nontrivially closer.

I've used Pyrex before.  It's heavy, chip/break prone, and sometimes grows legs from the office fridge.  It's really the weight that concerns me, oddly.

...

As for _heating_ leftovers, if you use a microwave, look into a plastic or ceramic plate cover.  Reduces splatters, reusable, dishwashable.  A former roommate had one, and it was on the short must-have list when I moved out.
A close second is the frying pan.  If I'm not heating something obvious like soup, sometimes I'll chop everything fine and run it through a stir fry, maybe with something new and fresh to keep the dish interesting.
 
pollinator
Posts: 344
Location: New Hampshire
129
hugelkultur forest garden chicken food preservation bee
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Lorinne Anderson wrote:***warning, not necessarily "true" permie friendly!
Laurel,
I too am a batch cooker, with my life it is the only option.  Like you, I freeze things individually, by portion and ingredient so things are easily mixed and matched to create a multitude of finished products.  I too tried the multiple versions of glass storage containers and silicone reuseable bags but as you found, they seem to all have plastic lids and/or did NOT like the freezer or traveling.  They chipped, cracked, leaked or otherwise failed in the freezer to table journey and I would find us slipping back into the blasted disposable zip locks, plastic film, single use plastics, and the worst - prepackaged frozen meals.  So I compromised.

Yes, they are plastic, but, I have been using them for a year now without a single failure. I bought three bulk kits and a bunch of smaller kits (about $200 in all) - something that would not have been affordable in any glass option for the quantities I require.  ALL the other containers went to thrift, every blasted one, so NO MORE SEARCHING FOR LIDS!!!

After much research and thought about what I disliked MOST about the 'mish mash' of plastic containers/lids filling over three cabinets I chose the Rubbermaid line of Easy Find Lids  ( https://www.rubbermaid.com/easy-find-lids.html ).  Not only are they quite economical when bought in kits, SOMEONE finally cracked the storage issue of 'food storage' containers; they come in three basic sizes for EACH size of lid, GENIUS!!!  Now one lid fits three containers with the same dimensions, just different volumes (they get taller), all three of each size stack together perfectly, and the lids (if you choose) snap to the bottom of the container.  Last, but not least, the mid size one comes with a VENTED lid for use in the microwave, pop the center vent and go from freezer to table without ever messing with a frozen container.  I get it, neither microwave use or plastic use of any sort is ideal, or permie.  At times one must compromise for the sake of family harmony and the reality of the world many of us live in.

For liquids, rice, cooked ground meat etc. I put directly into the containers; other items like cooked chicken parts are frozen on a metal sheet, then transferred to containers.  I am never happier then when my 21 cu ft "meal ready"/upright freezer is packed full!

Most offices/workplaces do not offer any option for reheating food that is NOT a microwave, sad but true.  In this instance, my choice was for healthy, home cooked food over packaged crap and horrific waste; a compromise that may not suit everyone, but I prefer to focus on the benefits rather than beat myself up for not being perfect - part way is better than no way.

https://www.rubbermaid.com/easy-find-lids.html



We came to the exact same conclusion about 8 years ago. We use the same type and brand of containers too.  I also like the Zip Loc Twist and Lock  containers for short term liquid storage.   While I would love to switch to glass I have hand grip  and proprioception problems  that make glass containers a frequent breaking hazard.  Glass containers with condensation on them are a real problem for me in my humid climate so we use plastic containers to reduce trips to reduce the need for stiches.  
 
Kate Muller
pollinator
Posts: 344
Location: New Hampshire
129
hugelkultur forest garden chicken food preservation bee
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
For freezer bags I buy 4 mill thick zip top bags from a restaurant supply web site for use in my freezer.  They are food grade and more durable than ziplock brand freezer bags.  I like that I can wash and reuse them several times before they start springing leaks.  While they are not as healthy as glass containers  they do allow me to store meats from local pasture raised animals and my own home grown produce.  

These are the bags I buy.  I also use the half gallon and the 2 gallon size.  
https://www.webstaurantstore.com/10-x-12-1-gallon-heavy-weight-seal-top-freezer-bag-pack/130F41012K%20%20100.html
 
Posts: 4
Location: SE Ohio
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

john mcginnis wrote:

jeff Swart wrote:

I am, however, rather disgusted with the canning jar rings and lids available over the past decade or so - they rust almost immediately and then become difficult to use - been meaning to write the companies about that e.g., Ball - danged obsolesce engineering

Cheers



If rusty rings are a turn off, go stainless steel. Gosh even Walmart (cough, cough) have them. They are pricey, but considering they are reusable if care is taken, the cost would not be that bad over a lifetime.



Thanks John
It's one of those things I grouse about every time I have a hard time opening a rusty lid (ring) but haven't got around to searching for alternatives. I like the stainless idea, and, by the way, as an alternative to Walmart & Amazon I just came across them at True Leaf Market - True Leaf Market
and at the 12 pack rate they're cheaper than one's I saw at Walmart!!!
 
Posts: 72
Location: A NorCal clay & rock valley
3
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Skandi Rogers wrote:
I have a couple of wax wraps but I really don't find much use for them, they can't be used with anything that actually is "dirty" since they cannot be cleaned properly, (cold water is not considered proper cleaning by the dishwasher in this house) and cannot go in the freezer. they get wrapped round bread and sometimes over one of the larger mixing bowls.



We've got a few beeswax wraps and I use them for bread making and pie crust wrappers. I feel like the slightly soapy cool water isn't hurting my wraps too much. Rarely it'll be used to cover something else in a mixing bowl, but it's not touching anything.

We use lots of pyrex for leftovers and lunches. I'm not a fan of the snap type lids, but my partner is. My older set of pyrex has the regular kind of plastic lid and on ebay I've found a fellow who makes replacement lids should mine crack or get microwaved, warp and die. The shipping makes them a bit more than I'd like to pay, but then the life of my glass bowls is again for years. And thrift shops often have the containers sans the lids of course. So it's just a matter of ordering lids.

If your glass is cracking and chipping, it wasn't made to be used like that. Not all glassware is created equal. Dishwashers are really hard on them I've noticed from other households.

I've got some vintage pyrex with the glass lids too. Those are more for cooking in than storage though.

We've got some reusable plastic containers too. I haven't been replacing those once they die. A few make their way to the greenhouse to hold dirt or seeds when they start to break down. You know that kinda bubbled, scarred look. When we moved to save space, most of those got recycled. I've only got handful left.

Mason jars galore! Soups, broths, salsas, veg puree, sometimes even snackies if we're going places. Way better than a Ziploc then we use it something else or even a glass to drink out of. I really like seeing the bento boxes or the metal container, but can't pop those in a microwave. I'm surprised at the number of folks who didn't know about putting glass in the freezer.  Non canning jars seem to bust in the freezer for me. Another one of those not all glass is created equal thing I believe.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 912
Location: Surrey, UK to Singapore to New Jersey
326
kids home care foraging trees books cooking food preservation bike fiber arts writing woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

jeff Swart wrote: I like the stainless idea, and, by the way, as an alternative to Walmart & Amazon I just came across them at True Leaf Market - True Leaf Market
and at the 12 pack rate they're cheaper than one's I saw at Walmart!!!



Thanks Jeff and bonus points for not being on Amazon
 
I think she's lovely. It's this tiny ad that called her crazy:
2022 Certified Garden Master Course at Wheaton Labs
https://permies.com/wiki/garden-master
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic