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Organic Russian Comfrey root cuttings available

 
Posts: 52
Location: The dry side of Spokane, USDA zone 6ish, 2300' elevation.
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I just wanted to let you know that the roots you sent did very well last year at our home in Anchorage, Alaska. Unfortunately, we sold the house and moved back to the lower 48. Those roots were among the several things from my garden that I couldn't take through Canada (damn border crossings). I will be contacting you soon for a new set of starts.
 
Posts: 83
Location: SW Wisconsin zone 4
14
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That's one of the strong points of Comfrey is it's hardiness and adaptability. Let's hope you don't move again for a while
Thanks for the feedback!
 
Ken Grunke
Posts: 83
Location: SW Wisconsin zone 4
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One major drawback regarding the regional flat rate boxes which I didn't foresee. They don't apply for online shipping label purchases. I don't understand why, but I just don't see them as choices when purchasing a label either through Paypal or the usps site. So can't use them unless I'm sure I can take them to the Post Office, which is a half hour drive, and I have to haul the boxes in to the counter and fill out the labels by hand. I am going to have to charge for the regular flat rate boxes so I can get the label online and arrange for pickup by my USPS carrier. Generally I don't go into town more than once a week but if I am able to use the regional ones I'll give a cash refund for the difference either in the package or in a separate envelope.

Here is a pic of the flowers on our Russian comfrey I took today.
SANY0049-comfrey_flower.jpg
[Thumbnail for SANY0049-comfrey_flower.jpg]
 
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Ken will you have any roots for sale this spring?
 
Ken Grunke
Posts: 83
Location: SW Wisconsin zone 4
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Eugene Headings wrote:Ken will you have any roots for sale this spring?



Yes I'll be digging again this spring and beyond.

I do have a bucket of roots that were dug before the last hard frost, stil crisp and in good condition with little sprouts coming out. Trying to keep them semi-dormant and not encouraging growth until the spring.

Asking $8 a lb. + shipping. Too cold to ship right now, I worry as everything goes to the big distribution center in Minnesota from here first - but we are expecting a warmup sometime next week.

PM me or email at kenearlg at gmail dot com please, thanks!

 
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Ken,

Could you tell me how many roots are in a one pound package, and how much shipping is (per pound) to zip 90290. Also, are these the Bocking 14 cultivar?

John
Topanga, Ca 90290
 
Ken Grunke
Posts: 83
Location: SW Wisconsin zone 4
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John,
There's roughly 20 pieces of root in a lb. I probably give a different answer each time I'm asked as the sizes vary so much so it's hard to pin down. Bigger pieces can be divided so you can stretch them out.
One pound would be $6 flat rate padded envelope, the cheapest rate.
I know for certain what I have is Russian comfrey, and most likely it's #14 but I have not verified it for sure.

Hopefully I can start digging same time as last year, last week in April. but we'll have to see!

Ken
 
John Clempermies
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In April, do you think you'll be able to verify which comfrey it is...or will it always be a question mark?

John
 
Ken Grunke
Posts: 83
Location: SW Wisconsin zone 4
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John Clempermies wrote:In April, do you think you'll be able to verify which comfrey it is...or will it always be a question mark?

John



Sorry for the delay in response, I missed the email notification.
I honestly don't know how I would do an accurate verification without an expert's help. I've been asking here and have posted some high-resolution pics of my plants. It is definitely Symphytum x uplandicum from which the Bocking strains were derived.
I am not a botanist or expert but from what I've read, my comfrey has all the characteristics of Bocking 14, it's more of a low-lying plant than B4 and the roots are more lateral than vertical. Beyond that, I don't think the differences are that great between #4 and #14. My advice to anyone desiring B4 is they should get it from someone who positively identifies it as such. I hope mine can be positively identified some day and not remain a question forever.
 
Posts: 82
Location: north end of the Keweenaw Mi.
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Hi Ken
this is the type of roots I am looking for
let me know wen you start digging roots and we will place an order
no hurry there is still 6' of snow were the roots are going to be planted
the second hill finally peeked threw the snow this week [its 5' high]
we do have good drainage here so the roots will do fine

Mike
 
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How many pounds can you get in a regional flat rate box? And how much would that max weight cost to ship to Oregon? Might just do a full large flat rate box, just thought I would check on pricing first. How soon can you ship, Oregon is warm enough to plant right now..,". Thank you!

Chris
 
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Howdy Ken, I am interested in ordering a medium sized box of roots from you. We are converting the family cherry peach cot orchard to permie style and would love some Wisconsin comfrey! I lived out in Watertown for a short spell 15 years ago, miss that place and the people out there:) Have a beautiful one, Dru
 
Ken Grunke
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Location: SW Wisconsin zone 4
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Dru McKenzie wrote:Howdy Ken, I am interested in ordering a medium sized box of roots from you. We are converting the family cherry peach cot orchard to permie style and would love some Wisconsin comfrey! I lived out in Watertown for a short spell 15 years ago, miss that place and the people out there:) Have a beautiful one, Dru



Hey there, Dru!
Everyone, I am digging again, I'm fullfilling orders from emails and private moosages so have not posted here until now. Dru, I should be able to get your order out by next Wednesday if not sooner. I'm asking $10 per lb. and shipping will be $12 for a medium flat rate box. Send me your full shipping address and I'll return an email invoice from Paypal. <kenearlg@gmail.com> or PM. My supply is finite, and I really am not sure how much I have available remaining. Given that, orders can only be fulfilled as I get the roots dug - so folks may need to wait before I can accept payment. Your first contact to me gets you on my list, and please tell me the amount desired in that message. I am limiting orders to a max of 8 lbs.

Dru, please send me your full shipping address, plus the amount desired, and I'll return an email invoice from Paypal. <kenearlg@gmail.com> or PM.

Thanks!

 
Ken Grunke
Posts: 83
Location: SW Wisconsin zone 4
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Still taking orders for Russian Comfrey, but I'll be away from home next week starting Tuesday until the following weekend so I can ship Mon. or Tues.

Comfrey can be planted anytime up until just before the first hard frost, but the earlier the better to give it a chance to establish itself.

Our plants are now fully leafed out and about knee-high:
http://i.imgur.com/Kjnjmq4.jpg

 
pollinator
Posts: 276
Location: Central Pennsylvania, USA
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+1 for Ken's Comfrey. I ordered some, and it arrived fast and in great condition. I already have some a foot tall in my Pennsylvania yard about two weeks after planting it. Thanks Ken!
 
Ken Grunke
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Location: SW Wisconsin zone 4
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Lazlo Rose wrote:+1 for Ken's Comfrey. I ordered some, and it arrived fast and in great condition. I already have some a foot tall in my Pennsylvania yard about two weeks after planting it. Thanks Ken!



Glad to hear that, Lazio! Comfrey grows fast in the right conditions. Thanks
 
Ken Grunke
Posts: 83
Location: SW Wisconsin zone 4
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This is a good time to start planting comfrey roots in the temperate zones so the plants get a chance to establish themselves. I have a limited supply of fresh Russian comfrey roots available to dig on demand.
I can ship any quantity from 1/2 lb to 10 lbs for $15 per lb straight across the board plus shipping.

Shipping for 1/2 lb would be $3.00 USPS First Class.
1 lb or 2 lb is $15.00 or $30.00 + $6.00 USPS Priority flat rate padded envelope.
3 lb to 8 lb is $15.00 per lb + $12.00 USPS flat rate medium box shipping.
9-10 lb shipping will be $17.00 in a large flat rate box.

Paypal is my preferred payment method. You can pay by credit/debit card even if you don't have a Paypal account. Personal checks are OK too. I like to use Paypal's invoice system even if a personal check will be used, I can mark it as paid when the check is received. It helps immensely with the record keeping.

Please email me at kenearlg@gmail.com to make an order.

My roots are anywhere between pencil sized to 1" or more thick, and a minimum of 4" long. Some are 12" long or more. Even a 1" piece will likely produce a sprout but it will take longer to establish itself. Plant root pieces horizontally about 2" deep in fertile soil. There are roughly 15 to 30 root pieces per pound, depending on size.

Ken Grunke
 
Posts: 74
Location: London, Ontario, Canada - zone 6a
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Hello Ken,

Are you still selling/shipping roots this season? Do you ship to Canada?

Thanks,

Imran
 
Ken Grunke
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Location: SW Wisconsin zone 4
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Amjad Khan wrote:Hello Ken,

Are you still selling/shipping roots this season? Do you ship to Canada?



Hi Imran,

Sorry I had notification turned off. Maybe it's too late in the season for you now.
If not, I am willing to ship to Canada if there are no customs complications. Don't think I've tried it yet.

I am going back to $10 per lb. My price increase stopped orders to a screeching halt Shipping costs will be the same as above.
I can dig yet for at least another couple more weeks, and hopefully will have extra dug to keep on hand after the ground freezes hard.

Thanks,

Ken
 
Posts: 263
Location: Eastern Canada, Zone 5a
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Ken Grunke wrote:

If not, I am willing to ship to Canada if there are no customs complications. Don't think I've tried it yet.



Shipping plants including scion wood across most borders requires a phytosanitary certificate. Canada is no exception. Without the certificate, material gets seized if it gets discovered. Seeds are OK although are certain grains where there are limits - 500 grams, IIRC.
 
Amjad Khan
Posts: 74
Location: London, Ontario, Canada - zone 6a
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Mike -

I wasn't sure myself about shipping across the border, but thanks for the information. I'll keep this in mind.

I often hear about great places to get plants in the States, but I think almost all (if not actually all) do not ship to Canada from the States. This restriction might be why.

Ken -

No challenge, I found another source in Canada and have already placed an order.

You can look at it this way - with a temporary reduction in orders, you now have a lot of healthy crowns that you can sell at a reduced price next season, yes? Make the best of it!

Best of luck to you both gentlemen,

Amjad
 
Ken Grunke
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Thanks to global war...err, climate change, I am able to dig comfrey roots in the second week of March, something I hadn't dreamed of being able to do. WE could have another frost, and very likely will, but for now this unseasonably warm weather looks to be here for at least another week. My price is back to $10 per lb but USPS rates have risen a bit. I can pack 2 lbs of roots in a flat rate padded envelope which is now $6.80 for shipping. 6 lbs will easily fit in a medium flat rate box, which is $13.45. I have gently crammed 8 lbs in a medium flat rate box. Please email me at <kenearlg at gmail dot com> with the amount you desire, and your full shipping address so I can send you an invoice.
Here is a shot of roots I dug today, two pounds worth:
comfrey_3-8-2016.JPG
[Thumbnail for comfrey_3-8-2016.JPG]
 
Ken Grunke
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To clarify, when people ask which Bocking strain I have, I have to say I'm not certain if it's #4 or #14. My message quoted below from last year shows where I stand on that. If I'm wrong, and it's #4, I assume most people would be happy with that rather than the other way around. So I say it's #14 which I feel is most likely.

Ken Grunke wrote:

John Clempermies wrote:In April, do you think you'll be able to verify which comfrey it is...or will it always be a question mark?

John



Sorry for the delay in response, I missed the email notification.
I honestly don't know how I would do an accurate verification without an expert's help. I've been asking here and have posted some high-resolution pics of my plants. It is definitely Symphytum x uplandicum from which the Bocking strains were derived.
I am not a botanist or expert but from what I've read, my comfrey has all the characteristics of Bocking 14, it's more of a low-lying plant than B4 and the roots are more lateral than vertical. Beyond that, I don't think the differences are that great between #4 and #14. My advice to anyone desiring B4 is they should get it from someone who positively identifies it as such. I hope mine can be positively identified some day and not remain a question forever.

 
Ken Grunke
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Location: SW Wisconsin zone 4
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Dear Permies,

My current price for Russian Comfrey roots is $12.00 per lb. Shipping is by USPS Flat Rate.

I have several choices for size of order.

You can order 12 ounces shipped by USPS First Class for $12.00, this includes shipping.
Or, 1 to 2 lbs in a flat rate padded envelope @ $12.00 per lb. + $7.00 shipping.
Between 3 lbs and 7 lbs in a medium flat rate box@ $12.00 per lb. + $14.00 shipping.
8 to 10 lbs in a large flat rate box @ $12.00 per lb. + $19.00 shipping. I have gently crammed 12 lbs into these boxes if you must have them.

The root sizes vary quite a bit, from pencil size to huge. Huge being about 2" diameter, but I don't ship the big roots in an envelope. They go into boxes for orders of 3 lbs or bigger.
If you want a small amount of very large roots, I can ship them in a small flat rate box. I don't get many of them so please contact me first by Purple Mooseage or email at kenearlg at gmail dot com to make sure I can fulfill your needs.

Ken Grunke
 
Ken Grunke
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I guess it's safe to say I will never run out of roots, so don't hesitate to order what you need! Our Russian comfrey plants are still green, we haven't had a hard frost yet. It's not to late to plant as long as the ground is soft. I just shipped a 12 lb. box to New Jersey. I could easily dig up a hundred pounds. Well, not easily, it's hard work, but easy as far as availability

My last message above is still current. Take care, fellow Permies
 
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Hi Ken do you still have comfrey roots available and artichokes?
redwhiteblue_2001@yahoo.com
 
Ruth White
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HI wrong email--redwhiteblue_2001@yahoo.com      

I am interested in buying from you.
 
Ken Grunke
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I have several pounds available that are already dug, iin a bin covered in loose soil in my cool basement, just begging to be planted. And much more to dig.
I want to ask my future customers if you would like me to cut root pieces shorter so I can cram more in a box. They typically would be 2-3 inches long. I have been shipping roots in 3-8 inch lengths, making it more difficult to pack tightly. I thing I can pack 3 lbs in a padded envelope, maybe even 4.
Possibly 14-15 lbs in a large flat rate box.
Prices and shipping are the same as last year, detailed in the post just above.
Also, last fall I planted a few Bocking 4 plants so that will be available next year.
PM me or email at kenearlg at gmail dot com please.
 
Mike Haych
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Location: Eastern Canada, Zone 5a
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Mateo Chester wrote:Another great Comfrey resource:

http://www.allotment.org.uk/vegetable/comfrey/comfrey.PDF



Busted link but still around permanently - https://web.archive.org/web/20080916041703/http://www.allotment.org.uk/vegetable/comfrey/comfrey.PDF
 
master steward
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Thanks Ken for the order two weeks ago.  They've been in the ground for 14 days and several are up already.  Probably the ones that had green growth on them already.  I should be buried in comfrey in a few months

You cut mine to 2-3" per my request and I'll try to remember to update this thread with how they perform later this summer.
 
Ken Grunke
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Mike Jay wrote:Thanks Ken for the order two weeks ago.  They've been in the ground for 14 days and several are up already.  Probably the ones that had green growth on them already.  I should be buried in comfrey in a few months

You cut mine to 2-3" per my request and I'll try to remember to update this thread with how they perform later this summer.



Mike, I appreciate your report! Just don't let the plants get thirsty, and they should do good.
 
Mike Haasl
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No problem.  5" of rain in the last week  I figure I'll treat them like a new tree and give them water if it hasn't rained significantly for 7 days.  Unless that's not enough?  I have sandy loam soil that drains overly well.
 
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