• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Devaka Cooray
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Dave Burton
  • Dan Boone
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
  • Mike Barkley

Endless supply of free pallets...

 
pollinator
Posts: 8298
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
641
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
He has reinvented the shiplap bar, which is part of the tool kit for every serious hand demolition outfit. The foot thing might be handy for those of limited strength, but it could never compete with the speed of a shiplap bar in qualified hands. Mine are both in the hands of my brother right now. Picture a 55" L-bar with the foot offset by 3inches so that the cross bar that joins the handle and foot becomes the spot where the tool rests on the joist. For pallets, you would stand on it so that the material doesn't roll.

I doubt that the guy in the video is aware of this rather obscure tool. His is safer for kids and others of limited strength. Mine is much stronger and versatile whether used to rip up floor boards, roof boards with 2 layers of asphalt attached or to pull drywall. I've pulled several hundred thousand feet of material with a self designed bar that beats the others. If I ever get it back, I'll post a photo.
 
Posts: 319
Location: (Zone 7-8/Elv. 350) Powhatan, VA (Sloped Forests & Meadow)
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think in both cases, I will stick to using pallets mostly as they come. Since ours are all low quality wood it is simply not worth the effort on our long list of to dos. However, anyone else who can get their hands on free pallets made from decent hardwoods should seriously consider using such a tool.
 
Posts: 37
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
As I said, there are other prybars. I'm getting old and,hopefully, wiser. I have a history of back problems brought on by going for speed when I should have been going for the long haul instead. Over the long haul I'll get a lot more wood with a lot less pain using this tool. There's an old saying to the effect of, "Don't lift it if you can slide it. Don't slide it if you can roll it. And, don't move it at all, it you can avoid it." I'm not on a serious demolition crew and I'm not competing with anybody. I'm breaking apart pallets for the wood I can get from them, and that wood isn't worth much back pain. If I can use my weight to pop them apart that seems like the smart way to go.
 
Posts: 27
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Im looking into building my home out of pallets. Any ideas or designs for such a home?

Thanks
 
Dale Hodgins
pollinator
Posts: 8298
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
641
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I used a garden pick to separate a pallet last week. I was able to stand on one side, so that my arms did very little. The pallet covered a skylight at a demolition job.

I was using the pick up lift tar covered cant strips around the perimeter of a big tar and gravel roof. Others using Burke bars made poorer production while hunched over. The pick method allowed me to stand up. If you ever must process many pallets, this is the way to do it without buying a specific tool for the task.
 
Posts: 21
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My "garage" was just a roof supported on posts when we moved in. I built walls from pallets, which I always have plenty of on hand. Covered them with re-claimed tar paper...all four walls were slapped together and made water tight in a day and a half at zero cost. Garage is full of tool shelves made from....pallets of course.


Our chicken run at our old house was made mostly from pallets.


Quarried stone is sometimes shipped on pallets: around here their always oak pallets, so you get good lumber that way.

I have never gotten very fancy with my pallet building....if I'm gonna go all out for a building project, my hands would rather work with branches. I like natural materials and am happier working with them. Just a matter of preference. When I need a flat surface, I'll very patiently rip some natural edge boards from a log--with my chainsaw. Pallets, I've only ever used for quick and dirty projects. You can of course make great stuff with pallets--I just have never applied my patience in that direction.

Now the oak pallets are impossible to dismantle--unless the wood is fresh and blonde. The older grey ones, forget about it. Since I know I won't make anything great with them, I'll take apart the blonde ones and give the material away to someone who loves that kind of thing.
 
gardener
Posts: 2344
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
152
forest garden trees urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Has anyone ever built a structure by using stacks of pallets for the walls?
I picture them shrink wrapped together...
 
Dale Hodgins
pollinator
Posts: 8298
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
641
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
These chairs are in the yard of a small grocery store. The two that are together sit at a distance from the one where the phrase begins. I sat in one and a young family read the end of the phrase. I told them the beginning and a kid found the missing chair by some bushes. Once all were read, the mother explained that it meant to eat good healthy food, not junk.
IMAG5643.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMAG5643.jpg]
IMAG5644.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMAG5644.jpg]
IMAG5645.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMAG5645.jpg]
 
Posts: 27
Location: Garrison, Montana
1
goat hugelkultur solar
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I used pallet wood to side the house. I like it!

 
Posts: 80
Location: Mad City, Wisconsin
trees food preservation bee
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Cortland Satsuma wrote:We have little around here that goes for free. However, the abundant half and full pallets are available for the taking in mass! I saw the unique pallet bed; but, have no need for it. If you had a ton of pallets available to work with, what would you use them for? (Any pictures would be great, too!)



Before doing anything with pallets - do your homework and know exactly what do you have.
You have been warned.


The FDA said about 70 people have been either sickened by the odor — including nausea, stomach pain, vomiting and diarrhea — or noticed it.

The smell is caused by small amounts of a chemical associated with the treatment of wooden pallets, Johnson & Johnson said. The FDA said the chemical can leach into the air, and traced it to a facility in Las Piedras, Puerto Rico.

The New Brunswick, N.J., company said it is investigating the issue and will stop shipping products with the same materials on wooden pallets. It has asked suppliers to do so as well.



I've recently learned that pallets made after 2006 are all treated (Government standards- ISPM 15)



From:
http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?237054-So-much-for-using-pallets-for-beehives!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISPM_15
http://www.instructables.com/id/Build-a-Beekeepers-Hive-Artificial-Hive/
 
Water proof donuts! Eat them while reading this tiny ad:
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!