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Non-sterile cultivation

 
Posts: 478
Location: Northern Maine, USA (zone 3b-4a)
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i also have king stropharia. i find they grow better if you mix some straw and some compost in with the chips then cover with a thin layer of compost. it holds moisture much better and i don't have to water them. i bet if you did that plus water them they would do well in your drier area. id also put a layer of compost in the bottom of your hole before you add your chips. you could start your mycelium indoors with the burlap sack method i described above. just mix in some compost also and put them in a large covered tote indoors with a few holes drilled in it for circulation. when they turn white with mycelium place them side by side in your shallow hole and cover with 3in. of chips and a layer of straw . should get shrooms in a few months this way. good luck!
 
master pollinator
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Thanks! I wish straw and pine chips were things we could get easily here, but they can only be had by purchase. I have tons of dying oak trees and loads of juniper.

 
steve bossie
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Tyler Ludens wrote:Thanks! I wish straw and pine chips were things we could get easily here, but they can only be had by purchase. I have tons of dying oak trees and loads of juniper.

could chip those oak branches. oysters and king stropharia will grow on shredded cardboard too. its wood pulp! rent a chipper and chip the branches with the cardboard, add a little compost , wet and inoculate! would work in the burlap bags too! oysters esp. aren't very picky .

 
steve bossie
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check with your highway department or yard work contractors for wood chips. lots of times they'll deliver you a load for free!
 
steward
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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I reviewed this thread, 4 years later. I just want to say that I am astonished at how much effort I put into growing mushrooms back then. Today my strategy is much simpler: I blend up whole mushrooms, with a bunch of water, and I pour the slurry over whatever I want to inoculate. It works great. My current oyster mushroom bed is wood chips on the ground, with logs stacked on top of that. I inoculate it whenever I have extra spawn. I add logs whenever they are available.
 
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