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Bacterial Endophytes!!

 
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Just a question. . .
I have a lawn planted with endophyte seed.  Can I compost the grass clippings?
Or does it resist composting to a point?

Also:
If I spread the grass clippings on my veggie garden. . .
Will it help or hinder the soil & plants?

Please- a simple answer that I can understand

 
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Location: RRV of da Nort
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Cindy Loos wrote:Just a question. . .
I have a lawn planted with endophyte seed.  Can I compost the grass clippings?
Or does it resist composting to a point?

Also:
If I spread the grass clippings on my veggie garden. . .
Will it help or hinder the soil & plants?

Please- a simple answer that I can understand



I don't see that this would be a problem.  From recollection, many if not most grasses with endophytic fungi will benefit from the specific interaction of that beneficial fungus and the host plant.  Once the plant dies, compositing and degradation of the biomass should commence as usual.  Also, I would not anticipate, after grass biomass decomposition, that the endophyte fungus would have any negative effects on
subsequent plant growth in that soil.

Rhys Firth wrote:
B T W, Endophytes are fungal, not bacterial.



Technically this is incorrectly stated.  It is true that there are endophytic fungi commonly called 'fungal endophytes', but it is equally the case to find bacterial endophytes that too exhibit endophytic colonization of the plant.
 
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https://permies.com/wiki/133872/videos/Profitable-Permaculture-North-Richard-Perkins
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