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Permaculture and the Human Body/Individual Behavior

 
                                  
Posts: 175
Location: Suwon, South Korea
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wyldthang wrote:
SO, back to the OP list of do-be-do



Come again???  Comments like this are not much of a substitute for an actual reasoned argument, are they?
 
steward
Posts: 979
Location: Northern Zone, Costa Rica - 200 to 300 meters Tropical Humid Rainforest
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mos6507 wrote:
If you think something's missing in education, you can certainly supplement it as a parent.  It's not really an all or nothing proposition.  Think of all the kids who go to Sunday school for religious purposes.  The same could be true of a permaculturalist.  Eco-school on the weekends, so to speak.

I think pulling kids out of the school system as some sort of ideological protest could be highly damaging to kids in a lot of ways.

Kids go through their own process of conformity and individuation anyway.  They are not necessarily as shallow and malleable as you think.




Though I am as willing as anyone to slam public education, since living in the frontier of a developing nation, where most of our workers don't have more than sixth grade, I can tell you there is a world of difference between someone who graduated high school and sixth grade. Mainly, it is science.

And with science, you have observation, because that is the scientific method. Granted, not everyone who graduates high school gets how to observe and learn, but it is much more difficult with those who merely have a sixth grade education.

My sample base is more than 200 people in this.

But, I will agree that often course work won't teach you how to think - but generally speaking, that is what pain is for. 
 
                              
Posts: 262
Location: Coast Range, Oregon--the New Magic Land
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bruc33ef wrote:
Come again???  Comments like this are not much of a substitute for an actual reasoned argument, are they?



"do" as in an action, to "do"

"be" as in existence, to "be"

"do", as in the cycle--what came first the chicken or the egg--existance is born of action, action is born of existence.

do-be-do-be-do-be-do, the way of the world since way back, the dance of everything

It's a phrase I use a lot and got from somewhere else.
 
Posts: 1206
Location: Alaska
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Fred Morgan wrote:
Though I am as willing as anyone to slam public education, since living in the frontier of a developing nation, where most of our workers don't have more than sixth grade, I can tell you there is a world of difference between someone who graduated high school and sixth grade. Mainly, it is science.

And with science, you have observation, because that is the scientific method. Granted, not everyone who graduates high school gets how to observe and learn, but it is much more difficult with those who merely have a sixth grade education.

My sample base is more than 200 people in this.

But, I will agree that often course work won't teach you how to think - but generally speaking, that is what pain is for. 



^That
 
pollinator
Posts: 2103
Location: Oakland, CA
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A buffalo has no chance of replacing a giant sloth, either. It would be nice if hunters had left a few giant sloths. I even think they should have left a few of the new-world horses, though feral old-world ones seem able to step into that role...they even seem to eat Osage orange fruit.

On clothing:

Polyester can be made from vegetable products. As oil prices are shakily ratcheting up, soda bottles (PET is a variety of polyester, used in beverage bottles, MRE envelopes, etc.) are including a significant fraction of plant-derived chemicals. While polymer chemistry is more difficult than biodiesel, I see no real barrier to completely local, sustainable production of synthetic fibers. Silk is labor-intensive, but I think US cities will be able to produce reasonable amounts of high-denier silk (from Samia cynthia) in the not-too-distant future, if existing stands of ailanthus continue to spread, and the economy goes the way it seems to be headed.
 
Emerson White
Posts: 1206
Location: Alaska
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With how industrial microbes are advancing it would be surprising if we didn't have something to through into a vat of water and woodpulp that would make something very easily polymerized into a wearable fiber within the next 30 years.
 
Posts: 418
Location: Eugene, OR
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The question is, what can replace the giant sloths? Time to start searching for viable DNA (CLONING!!! )
 
Emerson White
Posts: 1206
Location: Alaska
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What is the little devil guy for? We are already working on cloning back extinct animals, though it is difficult to find a uterus that can handle a giant sloth. Mastodons and Mammoths will surely return within the next 50 years or so.
 
Good heavens! What have you done! Here, try to fix it with this tiny ad:
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