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Name the top plants in your yard for bees.

 
master steward
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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My carrots are still flowering. Here's what the patch looks like:


There are lots of pollinators on them. No point in my trying to ID more than a few of them...

Ants:


Bee?1:


bee?2:


Bee?7:


Green Bee:


Beetle 1:


Beetle 2:


Beetle 4:


Beetle 5 (and midget):


Beetle?7:


Fly?1:


Fly?2:


Fly 3:


Fly 4:


Fly 7:


Fly 9:


Missing a photo of a fly with stripes on it's wings.

Honeybee:


Horsefly?:


Ladybug and suitor:


Mud dauber. That social behavior is unsettling to me...


Pollinators Flying:


Red Big:


Big black wasp:


Tiny black wasp?


Small black wasp?


Small wasp, red abdomen:


Wasp? Tiny black 2:


Yellow jacket:


Black Jacket:




 
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Alfalfa Clover, Strawberries, and Cucumber in that order.
 
pollinator
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The best plant for all bees right now is Echium with white clover being the runner up. Early spring is Honeysuckle & Japanese Barberry (the most hated and invasive plants in my area).

Coming up soon is Bull thistle and Mullein.

Chopping and dropping is becoming impossible as there always seem to be bees on the plants I want to chop! My best option seems to be mowing like rotational grazing in chunks and keeping the mower at the highest setting.
 
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Location: Northeast - 5B
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Lavandula - bumble bees ... the only bee I see at all...more than I had before I planted it so thats something!
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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This week's top attraction for honey bees are corn tassels. The corn patch is humming, Humming, HUMMING.

The most desirable item on the menu for all other species of bees continues to be the carrot flowers.

Honeybees on corn tassels.


Squash bee:
 
master steward
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My marjoram is abuzz with bees and all sorts of flies that I don't know to identify. I've never seen a plant with so many, and so many different, insects buzzing around it! I'm sure more things love that plant than they do the borage, let alone the rosemary (which are my other two big bee attractors).
 
pollinator
Posts: 352
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
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Awesome pics Joseph! Thank you for taking the time to grab some pics and post them up!

I disappeared for a while. I will try to make another update tomorrow or the day after. I am up in Alaska for a while now(no internet). Spent a few weeks in Kodiak Island... now I am on the North Coast for a few weeks... then going back to Kodiak for a few more weeks before going back home to Virginia. Missing out on naming some of the plants as they bloom. lol My wife said the artichoke and passion fruit vine are throwing out flowers now. Oh well...

I wish I was wise to the flowering species here. There are wild honey bees... and TONNS of wild flowers everywhere. (In Kodiak)
 
pollinator
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For the past month we've been drowning in a nice yellow-flowered weed about 3 ft high. Turns out it's crepis biennis, rough hawksbeard - http://www.luontoportti.com/suomi/en/kukkakasvit/rough-hawksbeard . The bees LOVED it.

In the meadow, centaurea pannonica - knapweed is now on the menu http://en.hortipedia.com/wiki/Centaurea_pannonica

Chicory, early in the day before the sun gets hot - http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/26/nyregion/chicory-is-the-cheshire-cat-of-herbs.html?_r=0

As with Gregory, bumblebees on lavender - but honeybees as well.

Also, this year we got a bit more of a flower display from a young goldenrain tree that's been planted specifically for bees. All kinds of pollinators on it. https://selectree.calpoly.edu/tree-detail/koelreuteria-paniculata

Still waiting for evodia to grow big enough to start flowering.
 
gardener
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Couple of my favorites:
oregano, lamb's ear and of course lavender.
 
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Had to post the pics. It's such an impressive clover stand most people are awed to see it. lol
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Joseph Lofthouse
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Bumblebees have shown up in my garden and are visiting: tomatoes, Solanum physalifolium, and oregano.
 
Marty Mitchell
pollinator
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Nice replies and pics folks!

Thank You

Just remember to attach the bee type to the plant type.

I will update the list sometime soon.

Marty
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Today in my garden the most attractive flowers for honeybees are squash, raspberries, and oregano. The corn flowers are just finishing tasseling, so the honeybee population on the corn is dwindling.

I see bumblebees on the tomatoes every time I am in the garden: At least 3 species. And the squash flowers have plenty of squash bees.

The fennel is still flowering, and highly populated with one species of wasp. There are a few other pollinators, but mostly they show little interest in fennel.
 
pollinator
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we have a lot going on here, so i am sure i will forget most =) but heres some of the plants that come to mind that grow in the yarden and the garden that usually have a lot of bees on them.
o also i have no clue what kinds of bees are which...so i will just give some plants. we do have four or five kinds? wasps, bees, and a ton of other insect pollinators.

chicory, mint, raspberry, blackberry, cherry, plum, oregano, borage, calendula, clary sage

edited to add a happy bee picture =)



 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
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Number One bee plant ATM is St John's Wort which I didn't even know I had growing.
 
Marty Mitchell
pollinator
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Missed out on most of my plants blooming for the last two months. Got sent on a deployment.

Anyways....

Tiger Swallowtail - Sweet potato flowers, lantana



Swallowtail caterpillars (of some sort)- Carrot leaves(didn't know that one)

Honey Bee - Garlic Chives

Honey Bee/Bumble Bee - Unknown. (what is this???) I will post it when I can... lol
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Joseph Lofthouse
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Yesterday the most popular plant in my garden for bumblebees was dahlias. Not fancy dahlias, but plain old open-centered dahlias that are part of my project to develop dahlias with edible tubers.



 
Marty Mitchell
pollinator
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Here is the flower species of which I did not know the name the other day. It was covered in honey and bumble bees in particular. There are three bumble bees in this one pic... What is this flower? It was in the in-laws yard.

Also, Bumble Bees - Lantana



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leila hamaya
pollinator
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it's a plant called celosia.
maybe celosia var plumosa, or sometimes i here that red one (most common type i have seen) called cristata.
 
leila hamaya
pollinator
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heres some info from a quick search

celosia

yeah oops, i guess the crazy looking brain flower types are called "cristata" this one is plumosa or feather celosia.
or...wait...actually the whole group is called Celosia argentea var. cristata?

the crazy brain looking flowers are kinda neat, different kind of celosia

celosia types
 
Marty Mitchell
pollinator
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That is it! Thanks Leila.
 
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The best plants for bees this time of year (Late-Summer and Fall) would be the following three varieties of flowers:

Asters (Symphotrichum spp., perennial): The pinks, blues and purples of late-summer and fall aster flowers are a delight to all bees. There are so many wonderful varieties to choose from it’s hard to know where to start. The classic ‘October Skies’ (image left, Symphyotrichum oblongifolium ‘October Skies’) is a wonderful late bloomer with lavender-blue flowers and orange centers, and the dusty sky blue ‘Bluebird’ (Symphyotrichum laeve ‘Bluebird’) is an earlier bloomer with prolific flowers.

Eupatorium purpureum 2Joe-Pye Weeds (Eutrochium spp., perennial): This group of mid-to late-summer bloomers produces big, fuzzy heads of purplish-red flowers filled with nectar and pollen. Native across North America, many of the sun-loving perennials are adapted to moist ground. One of the finest garden varieties is Eutrochium purpureum ‘Little Red’ with its 4′ tall stature and pretty reddish-purple flowers.

Goldenrods (Solidago spp., perennial): Lauded as one of the best bee flowers for late summer and fall, goldenrods become a buzzing mass when they open. In fact, goldenrod honey is a delicacy, known to be darker with a distinctive bite. Excellent garden-worthy goldenrods include the dwarf forms ‘Golden Fleece’ (Solidago sphacelata ‘Golden Fleece’) and ‘Baby Gold’ (Solidago ‘Baby Gold’).
 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
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Glenda Campbell wrote:
Goldenrods (Solidago spp., perennial):



Yup its Goldenrod time! The last hurrah! I can smell the honey strongly 10 feet or more from the hives. My husband kept saying that he couldn't smell it. I asked him if he smelled something like stinky sweatsocks and he said "yes." That's the bees turning the goldenrod nectar into honey, I told him. He's not a fan of honey so no harm done. To me it doesn't smell like stinky socks, it just smells like honey.
 
Marty Mitchell
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The unknown swallowtail caterpillars on the carrot leaves are...

Black Swallowtail larvae

I have seen two bust out of their cocoons over the last two days about 10ft from the carrots. Had one on my mailbox... and in the ornamental grass clump next to the mailbox.
 
Marty Mitchell
pollinator
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Now I have seen 5 black swallowtail drying their wings after hatching.
 
Cj Sloane
pollinator
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Next up, these tiny little asters:
 
Marty Mitchell
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Nice. I won't see asters for another month or two down here. Goldenrod just starting to bloom.
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Marty Mitchell
pollinator
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Heavenly Blue Morning Glory - Bumble Bee

May Pop/ Passiflora Incarnata/ Passion Flower - Bumble Bee (did I say that yet?)

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Heavenly Blue Morning Glory & Bumble Bee
 
Marty Mitchell
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Sun choke/ Jerusalem Artichoke - Honey Bee, Hover Flies, Butterflies, Pollinating beetles
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Sunchoke Honey Bee 2015
 
Marty Mitchell
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Golden rod - Hover Fly, Honey Bee, Solitary Wasp, Butterfly, and Pollinating beetles.

This time when I walked by there were bugs swarming one of the few wild goldenrods I let grow all Summer. Three little plants that grew tall with no help. Only one blooming so far.

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Joseph Lofthouse
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Not much flowering in my area right now...

The honeybees are thronging Bok Choi.

Honeybees and bumblebees are loving the raspberries.

The open centered dahlia flowers are popular with both the honeybees and bumblebees.

There is a species of small bee with pollen baskets on its legs that is visiting the sunflowers.


The honeybees are exploring a couple species of Physalis and also Solanum physalifolium which is a common weed in my garden. It's low growing, so I have to wear shoes this time of year while I'm in the garden to avoid stepping on bees and getting stung.

I had one corn plant in my garden that was flowering today... As a beekeeper, it might be worthwhile to plant a sacrificial crop of corn to mature in late fall for feeding the bees. I'm definitely planning on a planting of bok choi for next fall. It was also one of the earliest crops to flower in the spring.

Of particular note... There was a species of wasp that camped out on the fennel flowers all summer. There are still high concentrations of that wasp on the seed pods: even though they stopped flowering ages ago. Some of the fennel seed heads are covered with aphids, and ladybug larvae and adults, and those wasps...

Physalis peruviana.
 
Marty Mitchell
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Wild Asters - Honey Bees(like crazy), hover fly, and wasp.

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Wild Aster in Blackberries
 
Marty Mitchell
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Canna...

Both Humming Bird and Butterfly seen so far.

What type of butterfly is this? It is about 4" across and is Neon Yellow/Green. I only see this type showing up in Early Summer to Fall.
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Posts: 478
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last year my heritage raspberries were covered with bumblebees. we don't have any other bees in n. maine. too cold. was intimidating to pick the berries due to all the bumblebees! they were on them well after 1st. frost!
 
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Location: Northern California - Zone 9b
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One of the favorite plants in my yard for Honey Bees is rosemary. Here if flowers most of the year and provides good nectar in the cooler months.
 
Marty Mitchell
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Brian Vagg wrote:One of the favorite plants in my yard for Honey Bees is rosemary. Here if flowers most of the year and provides good nectar in the cooler months.



Thanks to the warm weather we have been having one of my rosemary bushes is starting to push out flower buds right now as matter of fact. First time I have seen one bloom so far. Good to hear the bees will like them!
 
Brian Vagg
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Marty Mitchell wrote:

Brian Vagg wrote:One of the favorite plants in my yard for Honey Bees is rosemary. Here if flowers most of the year and provides good nectar in the cooler months.



Thanks to the warm weather we have been having one of my rosemary bushes is starting to push out flower buds right now as matter of fact. First time I have seen one bloom so far. Good to hear the bees will like them!



When my rosemary is in full flower, the bushes look alive with all of the bees crawling over them. It really is a sight to see.

We make essential oil from the rosemary and I almost feel bad about taking the flowers from them. Rosemary is very medicinal and I wonder how much they seek it out as part of their medicine cabinet?
 
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Catnip and Lemon Balm are covered with all kinds of beneficals when they are blooming. Blue Aster is another busy plant.
 
gardener
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Last spring the Broccoli Rab was popular with the honey bees. As long as the Siam Basil is blooming there's always a honey bee on it.
There's a very small native flower known as frog fruit or matchstick plant that blooms for approx 9 months a year which seems to be visited by everything. I've seen more than one type of sweat bee, leaf cutter bees, wasps, several butterflies, and of course honey bees.
Ive seen bumble bees, honey bees, assorted butterflies and hummingbirds on the Mexican Petunias (some kind of Ruella? I think)
Honey bees on the pepper plants.
Honey bees absolutely loved the Snake melon vine.
 
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Hey everybody. I'm doing a series of images based on advice, etc. from the forms, and I did one from this thread! It's from the second (or third?) post in the thread.
Thanks, John!
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