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Intolerance to Pawpaw Fruit  RSS feed

 
Posts: 2300
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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I don't think that peanut is toxic like snake venom but alot of people are allergic to it and some even die in less than 10 minutes.
I also dont think that pawpaw is toxic but others might be allergic to it.

In the Caribbean, it is traditionally prepared:
diluted with water + lime/lemon for the sour flavored ones
diluted with condensed milk + water.
I have never seen anyone heat treat it (syrup/bake/fry/boil)

I don't think I ever seen anyone eating over 1lbs of 'raw/fresh' fruit from the tree.
Compared to say banana, mangoes, sugar cane, 'apple', etc.

Either way, listen to your body.
 
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Location: Abingdon, VA
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Since moving to western Virginia and getting some land with wild pawpaws, we’ve been trying different recipes. Ice cream, cheesecake, pudding, and today pawpaw waffles. Seemed crazy but both my wife and I got nauseated after the waffles and hadn’t eaten anything else. Never had a problem with any other recipe. So perhaps it is the high heat of the waffle griddle that does something to the fatty acids as mentioned by others. We’ll probably stick to fresh or frozen at this point.
 
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S Bengi wrote:
In the Caribbean, it is traditionally prepared:
diluted wi...



This discussion is not about papaya, it is about Asimina triloba, which does not grow in the Caribbean. The name "pawpaw" causes a lot of confusion. This "pawpaw," Asimina triloba, is native to the eastern US, places like Kentucky and Virginia, I think, though it can be grown in other temperate places. It is not a tropical fruit.
 
S Bengi
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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It belongs to the genus Asimina in the same plant family (the Annonaceae) as the TROPICAL custard-apple, cherimoya, sweetsop, ylang-ylang and soursop.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asimina_triloba

There is about 2000 species in the entire 'american pawpaw family - Annonaceae'
Out of the 2000 species only about 10 grows in temperate/american climate the others are all tropical.
Some native to the tropics of Central&South America including the Caribbean, others from tropical Africa and Asia.

In the Caribbean, custard-apple, cherimoya, sweetsop, and quite a few other 'wild' species are eaten (they are also all sweet). There are a few 'sour' species including soursop and it's related wild species.

I do understand that most of the former British colonies in the world except America use the world pawpaw to identify papaya, similar to football vs soccer.
Luckily I didn't get confused by pawpaw vs papaya.


 
S Bengi
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It seems that alot of people in USA also eat the skin. In the Caribbean no one eats the skin similar to banana skin or orange skin.
In fact the leaves/bark/skin can be used as a toxic insecticide. Just soak them in some water and then spray the toxic tea on the plants that have been over-run by insects.

In fact some French guys came to the Caribbean started drinking 'pawpaw leaf tea' (specifically soursop leaf tea) and eating the skin of it.
It didn't end well for them, they ended up with Parkinsons and other brain disorder. In fact it is thru these 1990's test samples the western medical world was able to quantify the insecticide and neurotoxins in the pawpaw family.
https://scienceofparkinsons.com/2017/12/16/paq/#more-48745

Edit: Now that I think about it the pawpaws with citrus overtones (sour) are never eaten straight from the tree only the sweet ones were on occasion.
Instead they were neutralized with lime juice and milk.

But all is not lost, the pawpaw fruit also contain a host of wonderful MPAQ, PAQ and melatonin-like compounds that protect and rejuvenate neurons.
https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jmedchem.6b00297
 
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