Win a copy of Bioshelter Market Garden this week in the Market Garden forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • James Freyr
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • r ranson
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Dan Boone
  • Carla Burke
  • Kate Downham

bees and colony collapse disorder

 
Posts: 12
Location: KY Zone 6
foraging hunting homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
FYE, Ellen Page talks about permaculture and CCD on Bill Maher

http://youtu.be/7qDHAjFVsXU
 
Posts: 190
Location: Andalusia, IL. Zone 5a
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
ScienceDaily (Jan. 12, 2012) — Honeybee populations have been in serious decline for years, and Purdue University scientists may have identified one of the factors that cause bee deaths around agricultural fields.

Link / Article
http://hines.blogspot.com/2012/01/honeybee-deaths-linked-to-seed.html

Regards to all
Monte Hines
 
                    
Posts: 177
Location: Bay Area, California (z8)
 
gardener
Posts: 1404
Location: Cascades of Oregon
24
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've seen this in a couple of areas now an accidental discovery when looking for praying mantis food might be the answer.

http://www.livescience.com/17718-fly-parasite-honeybees.html

 
                    
Posts: 177
Location: Bay Area, California (z8)
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Robert Ray wrote: I've seen this in a couple of areas now an accidental discovery when looking for praying mantis food might be the answer.

http://www.livescience.com/17718-fly-parasite-honeybees.html



I didn't see the possible "answer" in your story, could you give me the link? Very interested.
 
Robert Ray
gardener
Posts: 1404
Location: Cascades of Oregon
24
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This article might be a bit better.

http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/jan2012/2012-01-10-092.html
 
                    
Posts: 177
Location: Bay Area, California (z8)
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Robert Ray wrote:This article might be a bit better.

http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/jan2012-01-10-092.html



"404: The webpage cannot be found" Well, poop. I'll Scroogle search it myself, see what I can find.
 
Robert Ray
gardener
Posts: 1404
Location: Cascades of Oregon
24
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Fixed the link.....damn bifocals
 
                    
Posts: 177
Location: Bay Area, California (z8)
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
OH oh oh... you're saying the scientists found this possible answer for CCD while looking for Praying Mantis chow, not that Praying Mantids' food choices could solve this parasitoid problem. Sorry. Got it now.
 
Robert Ray
gardener
Posts: 1404
Location: Cascades of Oregon
24
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hey maybe having a praying mantis close to the hive would be an answer if they'd just eat the offending flies.
 
Posts: 1132
Location: Central Wyoming -zone 4
14
hugelkultur dog chicken
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
not sure if this has been asked but
WHY do you want to encourage swarming? what is the purpose of it?
 
                    
Posts: 177
Location: Bay Area, California (z8)
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Robert Ray wrote:Hey maybe having a praying mantis close to the hive would be an answer if they'd just eat the offending flies.



It appears that the bees were to be the mantid chow. Mantids would eat flies and honeybees both if close to an infected hive.
 
steward
Posts: 3495
Location: woodland, washington
120
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Devon Olsen wrote:not sure if this has been asked but
WHY do you want to encourage swarming? what is the purpose of it?



swarming is how the "superorganism" reproduces. so if one colony swarms, two colonies are the result. it's likely that it's also an important part of the colony's life cycle, quite apart from the reproductive function. it also leads to naturally-mated queens which gives the many advantages of genetic diversity in a colony.

one huge advantage of natural swarming over methods of artificial reproduction (shook swarms, packages, splits, et cetera) is the vertical transmission of pathogens and parasites instead of horizontal transmission. vertical transmission allows adaptation over time and reduces the need for stressful intervention. horizontal transmission allows no adaptation, and leads to more long-term colony losses as interventions lose effectiveness over time.
 
pollinator
Posts: 3206
Location: Toronto, Ontario
393
hugelkultur dog forest garden fungi trees rabbit urban wofati cooking bee homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So I'm a big fan of www.sciencedaily.com, as they are really good for academic and periodical sourcing. This article came up today:

( http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/03/120330111027.htm )

It seems to suggest that human interference is standing in the way of bees healing themselves, which makes sense to me, as it correlates with the idea that humans preventing swarming behaviour and messing with their food supplies and their quality. It also accords with some permaculture ideas of livestock self-medicating in an environment where sufficient quantities of good food and useful poisonous plants co-exist.

-CK
 
steward
Posts: 28834
Location: missoula, montana (zone 4)
hugelkultur trees chicken wofati bee woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


(source)
 
Posts: 278
Location: Southern Indiana zone 5b
3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
http://www.weather.com/video/a-clue-to-what-is-killing-the-honey-bees-48355

Link to a news report on Harvard study on CCD and neonictinoids (or however that's spelled).
 
steward
Posts: 3997
Location: Montana
344
fungi books food preservation bee
 
Posts: 180
Location: Boise, Idaho (a balmy 7a)
16
goat trees urban chicken wofati solar
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I liked Paul's CCD better because it has solutions. The new one you posted is alarmist and will get more reaction.

Thanks for posting both and reminding us that we can be our worst enemy or nature's best friend, just how you clean the lenses on your sunglasses.
 
Posts: 44
Location: Western PA
2
urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Lots of good information. Most of the world is out on holiday. Give the video time. It will get there.

Along with the "funny you should mention that" comment, my borage has never been so lonely. This is a new experience for me. Last year it was hopping with pollinators. I don't live in an area with big ag chemicals. I live in a small town in the heart of frackland. Around here, the weather is screwing with nature. We hit 93° in early May, followed by two very late frosts. I see climate change. In the last 5 or so years, we've been having two winter seasons, an early severe October winter, bitter cold but no snow, followed by mild Nov/Dec. and real snow and normal cold in January/February. I am starting to see two summer seasons now, warm April/May followed by cold snaps. It's very discouraging. (I'm thinking of putting the garden on wheels.) It seems we have two honeybees and two bumble bees trying to work a tenth of an acre food forest. I chose not to raise bees because we already had lots. I am hoping they recover. I miss my pollinators. The hummingbirds are gone too.
 
Posts: 519
Location: Wisconsin
8
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
One detail about neonics that I learned a few weeks ago is that they are a powdered substance that coats the seeds on commercial seeds. There are some planters that use vacuum and a (harmless) talc powder to lubricate the parts in the planter mechanism at the planter. Other planters don't use vacuum and the operator uses graphite to lubricate the parts. One theory on how the neonics are causing problems for bees is that the talc dust carries the full strength neonic dust in the air where it lands on plants where the bees forage. The bees then take this full strength dust with them to the hive. Some of this info was taken from the Wikipedia page on neonics.

 
John Master
Posts: 519
Location: Wisconsin
8
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I would have thought this would be something that would have gotten more excitement on here, One neonic got its fda approval revoked! http://m.startribune.com/politics/statelocal/326524291.html?section=%2F
 
It's fun to be me, and still legal in 9 states! Wanna see my tiny ad?
Switching from electric heat to a rocket mass heater reduces your carbon footprint as much as parking 7 cars
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!