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Comfrey - Believe the Hype  RSS feed

 
Posts: 442
Location: Northern Maine, USA (zone 3b-4a)
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i have 6 planted under my 50ft. red pines. they grew to 3ft. this year and its heavilly shaded there. even grass has a hard time under them but 2 yr. old comfrey still thrives, tho not as well as if grown in full sun.
 
pollinator
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Location: mountains of Tennessee
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Today I went back to the garden I took the original transplants from to see if any more have appeared. They had. So I dug them up & transplanted into the new garden. Divided 2 larger plants into 3 or 4 pieces each. Left 2 smaller plants intact. Did the same for the 2 plants I mentioned being in the shade. Planted it all in the hugelhole. So about a dozen new plants & few root pieces in the hole. But wait, there's more. Read on another thread this week about someone starting new plants from just the leaves. So I removed leaves from some of the established plants to see if that works for the variety I have.



Remembered to include the asparagus in waiting in this batch of pix. It's the tall fluffy stuff.

 
steve bossie
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Location: Northern Maine, USA (zone 3b-4a)
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not sure about the leaves but the lower stalk will start a new plant. had 1 start growing in my compost pile.
 
Mike Barkley
pollinator
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Most of the leaves had the entire stalk too. Tried one or two with nothing but the leaf. We shall see.
 
steve bossie
Posts: 442
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i meant the main stalk that the leaves were attached to.
 
pioneer
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Location: Central Oklahoma (zone 7a)
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Because I am lazy, I have gotten really good use of the "comfrey tractor" notion that comes out of Jack Spirko's Survival Podcast universe.  (The name is by extending the "chicken tractor" analogy of a mobile chicken coop.)

A comfrey tractor is just a plastic milk crate full of dirt, or a plant pot with lots of generous holes in the bottom.  You grow comfrey in it.  The comfrey will put roots down through the holes into your ground beneath. 

Then, every so often (I do it a couple of times a year, twist the crate to break off the roots, then pick up the milk crate and move it to some new spot where you'd like a comfrey plant.  If you're feeling fancy, drop a shovel full of mulch or an armload of chop-and-drop on the old spot (though, comfrey being comfrey, this is not strictly necessary.)  Soon you will have a strong new clump of comfrey where your crate was.

I always have at least two or three of these going.

Honestly in the heat and drought of Oklahoma, the comfrey plant in the crate never does very much; it's usually just two or three shoots, not very tall, and it doesn't usually flower profusely.  Being up high in dried-out soil doesn't make it happy.  But it tries very hard to put down roots into the native soil, so it gets the job done.
 
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