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Tooth decay reversal diet  RSS feed

 
pollinator
Posts: 1126
Location: Green County, Kentucky
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I don't know about that, Pam, but I have read that arthritis, at least some kinds of it, are caused by long-term inflammation, which is often caused by too much carbohydrate in the diet.  I know my own personal experience has been that I can tell within hours if I've over-eaten on carbs, as I start to have not only sore, inflamed joints, but also aching muscles.  Cut the carbs and it takes about two days for the inflammation to settle back down.

Kathleen
 
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For myself, I have found that Vitamin D3 supplements have helped rebuild the enamel on my (formerly quite sensitive teeth). Drinking and eating significant amounts of dairy products did nothing helpful, nor did calcium/magnesium supplements (even those that had added vitamin D2.)

I am of the opinion that Vitamin D3 is very important for dental enamel but that Vitamin D2 is almost worthless, (though there may be scientific evidence suggesting otherwise).

I took 1000 mg of D3 daily for months without seeing improvement, however upon doubling to 2000 mg daily things started to turn around for me. (In the winter I am taking 3000 mg daily but in the summer cut back to 2000.)

Vitamin D3 is the only supplement I take daily now, I have given up on all of the others.

Many healthy food items can be murder on your teeth. Tomatoes, lemons, vinegar, lactic acid pickles - anything acidic can do as much or more damage than dental caries bacteria. I love acidic foods but had to learn to eat them in moderation or at least be careful to rinse well with water quickly after eating.
 
Kathleen Sanderson
pollinator
Posts: 1126
Location: Green County, Kentucky
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That's good news about the vitamin D3 supplements.  My daughter and I are taking 6,000 IU daily right now, and will cut back to 4,000 IU daily in the summer (at least I will -- she can't be out in the sun, so I may keep her at the higher level).  It has really made a major difference for both of us in how we feel and function.

Kathleen
 
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velacreations wrote:
Let's hope so, although that is not setting the bar very high (better than the SAD)....
Would you mind posting a source for this?  I have not seen any evidence that suggest that meat is associated with osteoporosis.  I have seen considerable evidence that meat consumption is associated with good bone density.

Vitamin D seems to be an important part of this study, as that was one variable that was changed and showed significant results.



I have read about pasteurized, homogenized, industrially-produced milk causing osteoporosis, but I do not recall the source.  If I come across it in any of my books later, I will try to remember to come back here with a reference.  In any case, raw milk from grass-fed cows is not a problem.
 
                          
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Location: Ozarks
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The human is adapted to a very wide range of diets. I don't think any diet is superior, however, the Western diet is by far and away a bad diet. Chemicals, empty carbohydrates, sugars, high-fat meats, GMOs, etc etc.
 
Posts: 145
Location: B.C.
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Foods high in Vitamin K.
http://www.amazon.ca/Vitamin-K2-Calcium-Paradox-Little-Known/dp/1118065727

We know about calcium for bones and teeth. Good! We learned about Vitamin D. Good. Now we need to know about the balance between fat soluble Vitamins D and K!

The Japanese are NOT milk drinkers yet they have few fractures and good bone health into advanced old age. Why? It may be that they eat green sources of Calcium (and don't rely on milk as a source or supplements) and they eat fermented soy products. Research "soy isoflavones" and/or the term 'osteoblasts"

http://www.sonamex.com/biblioteca/wong.pdf

 
Posts: 116
Location: Colorado
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College-level nutrition course teaches the mechanics of high-meat diet=higher osteoporosis risk.
Meat is a whole, complete protein. Unlike incomplete, partial proteins of vegetables, grains and other plant foods, complete proteins are hard for your body to digest. (Though for some people, their bodies work sorta opposite.) Your body has to break down the complete protein of meat in order to do this. And <if I remember correctly> this breakdown process produces an acid byproduct that draws calcium (to neutralize it?) out of the bloodstream, or if not enough there, out of the bones. Dairy does this too. Its actually easier on your body to get your protein by eating plant foods with complementary proteins (legumes + grains) to make a complete protein which your body can utilize readily, rather than eating a non-fractured complete protein that your body has to put a lot of effort into breaking down in order to use.
Most plants have protein and fats and other nutrients that you would not expect them to, because there is little in-depth research that is well-known. For instance, did you know that lettuce has protein?
 
pollinator
Posts: 1463
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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Oil Pulling - not really a diet but more of a process. Has anyone else here tried it? I used to do it but stopped and someone recently reminded me of it so I started up again.

I doubt there is any scientific proof that this has any benefits but I do know that when I do it regularly my mouth feels a lot cleaner, less stuff sticks to my teeth and I don't wake up with kitty litter box mouth in the morning.

I have used different oils; olive, grapeseed, currently using coconut oil.

Does it work - I don't know, I have old teeth that suffered a lot of damage years ago. So far no new damage and the dentist seems to be impressed with gum health and so forth. I don't seem to get colds much anymore and I used to have terrible sinus problems but not anymore - of course all that could also be attributed to my diet and lifestyle.
 
Posts: 1502
Location: Chihuahua Desert
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Varina Lakewood wrote:College-level nutrition course teaches the mechanics of high-meat diet=higher osteoporosis risk.
Meat is a whole, complete protein. Unlike incomplete, partial proteins of vegetables, grains and other plant foods, complete proteins are hard for your body to digest. (Though for some people, their bodies work sorta opposite.) Your body has to break down the complete protein of meat in order to do this. And <if I remember correctly> this breakdown process produces an acid byproduct that draws calcium (to neutralize it?) out of the bloodstream, or if not enough there, out of the bones. Dairy does this too. Its actually easier on your body to get your protein by eating plant foods with complementary proteins (legumes + grains) to make a complete protein which your body can utilize readily, rather than eating a non-fractured complete protein that your body has to put a lot of effort into breaking down in order to use.
Most plants have protein and fats and other nutrients that you would not expect them to, because there is little in-depth research that is well-known. For instance, did you know that lettuce has protein?


How does that explain the lack of osteoporosis in high-meat (primitive and paleo) cultures?

Maybe the quality of the meat has something to do with it? I know most of us would agree that pastured raised meats have a different nutrient profile than grain-fed meats. The diet of the animals and/or plant is rarely taken into account on popular studies.
 
Abe Connally
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Location: Chihuahua Desert
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Peony Jay wrote:
The Japanese are NOT milk drinkers yet they have few fractures and good bone health into advanced old age. Why? It may be that they eat green sources of Calcium (and don't rely on milk as a source or supplements) and they eat fermented soy products. Research "soy isoflavones" and/or the term 'osteoblasts"


The Japanese also eat a lot of fish products, including organs and head meats. They also eat a lot of organ meat from land animals. All of these items are loaded with fat soluble vitamins (A,D,E,K).

Calcium alone will not do it. You need proper balance of nutrients, including phosphorous, magnesium (there are direct relationships between calcium and these minerals, and the ability of your body to utilize calcium), and all of your major vitamins.
 
Abe Connally
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Location: Chihuahua Desert
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I just finished reading this book: Cure Tooth Decay: Heal and Prevent Cavities with Nutrition. I highly recommend it as a guide for adjusting diet towards better dental health. It is a convincing read, and is very interesting looking at different diet requirements to remineralize teeth. If you search the web for info about it, you find lots of folks testing out his diets (increasing organ meats, seafood, pastured meat and dairy) and having positive results.
 
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There is great evidence out there that shows that adopting a change of diet, one can reverse tooth decay. I have been blessed to not have to deal with this issue but have a close friend that is presently taking several supplements to assist in tooth decay reversal. Accoring to wellnessmama.com : taking high vitamin butter oil and fermented cod liver oil offer the beneficial omega 3 fats that assist in tooth decay reversal.

http://wellnessmama.com/3650/how-to-remineralize-teeth-naturally/

I also use the remineralizing homemade toothpaste that is super! It contains no crazy chemicals, is very easy to make, and cost effective!
 
Presenter
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Location: Tampa, Florida
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The book Cure Tooth Decay is an excellent book on this subject and a must read for parents who wish to avoid having children with cavity ridden teeth.
 
Sarah Pope
Presenter
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I have actually healed cavities several times in myself and/or my children. Here is a write up of the first time I did this:

http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/how-i-healed-my-childs-cavity/
 
Posts: 25
Location: WA
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Amanda Suzanne wrote:There is great evidence out there that shows that adopting a change of diet, one can reverse tooth decay. I have been blessed to not have to deal with this issue but have a close friend that is presently taking several supplements to assist in tooth decay reversal. Accoring to wellnessmama.com : taking high vitamin butter oil and fermented cod liver oil offer the beneficial omega 3 fats that assist in tooth decay reversal.

http://wellnessmama.com/3650/how-to-remineralize-teeth-naturally/

I also use the remineralizing homemade toothpaste that is super! It contains no crazy chemicals, is very easy to make, and cost effective!



I agree - her toothpaste is amazing! My teeth have never felt so fabulously clean.

And I'm almost finished reading Cure Tooth Decay. I had 5 (seriously, FIVE cavities, UGH!) filled last year, and when I felt two more creeping up on me recently, I absolutely freaked out. I found Cure Tooth Decay and it completely inspired me to give WAPF a chance. Prior to that, I'd been eating a primal diet, but still not doing fantastic - rice and sugar are hard habits for me to kick!
 
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I find this all very fascinating, but so seemingly obvious as well. Eat real whole food and guess what? Your whole body will be healthy!

We switched the the GAPS diet a year ago after 15 years as vegetarians and I'm hoping we'll never have to worry about tooth decay again. We eat loads of pastured butter and have fermented cod liver oil every day. I'm keen to read Cure Tooth Decay now- I'm pretty sure our diet is very similar.
 
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The GAPS diet is extremely similar. You're getting lots of nutrient rich broth and few (or, in your case, no) grains. If you added fermented cod liver oil, butter from grass-fed animals, and marrow then you have Rami Nagel's diet.
 
gardener
Posts: 1886
Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
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Recently my WAP enthusiast friends and I spent a whole evening discussing tooth decay.   Some very interesting things came out.  The current theory that tooth decay is caused by food residues and bacteria in our mouths that metabolize them was adopted in the 30's by vote.  One of the other theories - the one that appeals to my sense of logic and understanding of physiology- the one that is supported by WAP's research about tooth decay and the industrial diet was NOT selected as the official theory.

From what Iunderstand, this theory is based on the idea that calcium,phosphorous and magnesium in the wrong proportions, and not enough vitamin D, (and probably a few other factors) create a situation where in bones and teeth are demineralized in order to keep the blood within the pH that supports life.  One of the things that upsets the balance and draws minerals out of the bones and teeth is phytic acid and phytates, which are present in most grains, legumes, seeds and nuts.  Perhaps someone will post the list or chart with that data.  Some grains have an enzyme which can convert the phytates and phytates to another form, and possibly then phosphorous becomes available through that process. 

Rye is one grain that has the phytase enzyme, and when sprouted that enzyme is somehow activated, and given time it can convert the phytates not only in the rye but in other grains in the mix. 

We have been following the idea that legumes and  whole grain flours are "good for us", and we have been led to believe that sprouting nuts will decrease the phytate levels, but the research shows that it is not always the case.

I got pretty confused with all the information, and started in on the "what can I eat then?" cycle.  But I did discover the process of making vollkornbrot  ( https://permies.com/t/66366/vollkornbrot).  Sprout the rye, wet grind the rye, ferment the dough,then bake.  All this to decrease my intake of phytates when I hardly have anything but gold, silver and ceramics in my mouth, and an implant too.  How can I forget the implant, it cost as much as a decent used car!  It is way to late for me to wrooy about reversing tooth decay, but I can attest to the fact that though I brushed my teeth as I was supposed to, the cavities kept coming, and the dentist of my childhood was less than inspired.  The new cavities kept coming under the fillings. 

But I strongly recommend that people concerned about tooth decay who would prefer not to spend large amounts of money on dental services look in to the remineralization of teeth.  And the vollkornbrot is delicious.
 
pollinator
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Thekla McDaniels wrote:From what I understand, this theory is based on the idea that calcium,phosphorous and magnesium in the wrong proportions, and not enough vitamin D, (and probably a few other factors) create a situation where in bones and teeth are demineralized in order to keep the blood within the pH that supports life.  One of the things that upsets the balance and draws minerals out of the bones and teeth is phytic acid and phytates, which are present in most grains, legumes, seeds and nuts.  Perhaps someone will post the list or chart with that data.  Some grains have an enzyme which can convert the phytates and phytates to another form, and possibly then phosphorous becomes available through that process. 



and zinc
https://www.calciumtherapy.com/order-calcium-materials/

I had low vitamine D though doing it right about the sun. Then I was told that my body was down regulating it on purpuse, in order to not increase my calcium, because I was having my ratios bad... Calcium on its own means nothing, as you need to get it with the right ratio to K or P

So I did a hair analysis with a lab called TEI.
My calcium was just right, my magnesium was very good, but my potassium and phosphorus were too low!
Thus a bad ratio with calcium, then it matched this strange low vitamine D i had under a tropical sun.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/148288765299635/
https://www.mineralcheck.com/

 
pollinator
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Thekla the question is with your new bread: did you get more cavities? Or did it arrest the cavities?
 
Thekla McDaniels
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Hi Angelika,

about cavities:  I don't have any,so I can't say more or less.  I am old enough that I have amouth full of silver amalgam, "porcelain" (read some kind of plastic substance that they call porcelain these days)  and gold.  Hardly any surfaces left to decay.  But I did give up modern dentistry, check ups, cleanings, tooth paste (I use baking soda) and even "regular"brushing some years ago, and have suffered no ill effects.  I do brush and floss when it feels like my teeth are coated.

Floss with bkg soda as grit gets them smooth again.  I also use dental irrigator in the shower, and that seem to be the best.  I have an "implant".  They put a pieceof steel into my jaw bone,then a crown on that.  The space between the gum and the steel will never close up they the gum does fuse/ adhere to the tooth root and the bone.  I always had a kind of weird taste in my mouth which increased when ever I had a cold or congestion.  I took this to indicate I had a bit of infection or drainage coming into my mouth from deep within the tissues of my jaw bone.  When I began the oral irrigator  then that thing went away.

The one I have is called "oral breeze".  here is a link  https://oralbreeze.com, though a search to find that link had a couple of sites selling at so called reduced rates, if anyone is interested in pursuing possible cheaper prices.

I can only speak for the oral breeze people.  I bought direct from them, and they have been more than helpful over the years.

 
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