Win a copy of Straw Bale Building Details this week in the Straw Bale House forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Anne Miller
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
stewards:
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Burra Maluca
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Mike Barkley
  • Shawn Klassen-Koop
  • Pearl Sutton

Permaculture sources of omega-3 fatty acids  RSS feed

 
Posts: 187
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Walter Jeffries wrote:Pastured Pork fat. Not "pastured" where they are really being fed grain as their main diet but I mean really pastured.

That is what I meant and I doubt anyone on here thought I meant otherwise.
 
Warren David
Posts: 187
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ben B wrote:The problem with the Weston A Price philosophy is that it only shows a clear benefit when compared to the standard western diet. Weston Price, if you read his book, was never out to promote animal foods or to bash vegetarian diets. He was showing that processed foods are the main causes of tooth decay and overall disease in the body. Yes, special compounds in animals such as vitamin K2, carnitine, carnosine, DHA, EPA, etc all have benefits but these are all compounds that humans are SUPPOSED to be be producing themselves when eating a plant-based diet. Grass-fed meats, butter, and fish oil only shows a clear benefit when added to a diet deficient in the precursors of those nutrients OR a an abundance of junk clogging up the conversion process. In our case here of omega-3, feeding fish liver to a famished native living on rice and corn would improve their health dramatically. They weren't previously getting adequate nutrition for their body to synthesize all the nutrients that it needs. In addition, giving that same fish liver to a 40-year old overweight computer programmer would improve their health. The high amounts of arachadonic acid from animal products and polyunsaturated omega 6 from oils out-competed for the enzymes that convert short chain to long chain omega 3: desaturase and elongase. This causes an imbalance in fatty-acid profile and thus the need to supplement or eat animal foods. I'll admit, the omega-3 could be even life saving in both cases. I won't argue that.

But what about the third option? What about someone who has their body in good working order and follows a low-fat vegan diet high in fruits and vegetables. What's their omega-3 status like? Watch my my video and find out

If good health was all about getting your omega 3 level right then that would be great but you will probably end up with various deficiencies somewhere down the line. No offence but at age 51, I am beyond caring what young people have to say about nutrition. I have nothing against young people. I was young once. Young people do pretty well on just about anything so long as they don't overeat. Unfortunately for them they will become old too one day and what they could get away with when young, probably wont work when they get old.
 
Posts: 1113
Location: Mountains of Vermont, USDA Zone 3
57
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Ben B wrote:low-fat vegan diet



Hmm... Like Steve Jobs who was in very bad health? Or the baby who died of a vegan diet?

Interestingly there was a report I read recently that stated that there has been an upsurge in mineral and vitamin deficiencies with death resulting due to people following vegetarian and vegan diets. The specifically mentioned selenium deficiency which causes white muscle disease.

I've tried vegan, vegetarian, etc primarily because I was living with people who were doing that. I wasn't impressed. I prefer a well rounded omnivore diet. It is healthy and sustainable in our climate. Realize that a vegan/vegetarian diet is NOT sustainable in our northern climate. There's a thing called Winter that comes around half the year and kills off the plant life. Animals are stored food. Veganism and vegetarianism are not sustainable here without supplements or food trucked in from long distances at a high petroleum cost. An omnivore diet is healthy and sustainable with local resources.

If the issue is sitting on your butt all day not getting enough exercise then don't blame the diet. Change jobs or simply be a lot more active in the non-butt sitting hours.
 
Walter Jeffries
Posts: 1113
Location: Mountains of Vermont, USDA Zone 3
57
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Warren David wrote:

Walter Jeffries wrote:Pastured Pork fat. Not "pastured" where they are really being fed grain as their main diet but I mean really pastured.

That is what I meant and I doubt anyone on here thought I meant otherwise.



Don't worry, I wasn't referring to your statements at all.
 
Warren David
Posts: 187
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Walter Jeffries wrote:

Ben B wrote:low-fat vegan diet

I've tried vegan, vegetarian, etc...

Me too. The propaganda was pretty convincing and I felt fantastic for the first few days. Eventually my health started deteriorating though.

I think you have the right idea with your "really pastured" animals. I doubt that any kind of supplements like omega 3 capsules etc can be better for us or even as good in the long run than eating properly fed animals and properly grown fruit and veg.
 
Posts: 471
Location: Jackson County, OR (Zone 7)
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Walter Jeffries wrote:Pastured Pork fat. Not "pastured" where they are really being fed grain as their main diet but I mean really pastured. When animals eat forages they store higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their fat. Same for fish (phyto-plankton) and cattle that are really on grass diets. We raise pastured pigs (it's our main thing at our farm) so we are doing lab research into the exact levels of Omega-3 fatty acids and other things and how they vary over the seasons.

Any animal that is eating lots of greens is likely to be a good source of the Omega-3 fatty acids.



I'd be interested to see how the measured levels of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids come out from your animals over the seasons. I haven't come across much info from pastured pork, so it would be very interesting.

If I recall correctly, you supplement the pigs diet with whey. Are the dairy cows also also on a pastured only diet?

Sounds like a wonderful farm, thank you.
 
Posts: 98
Location: BC Interior, zone 5a
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sea Buckthorn seed is high in omegas and has a 1:1 ratio of omega 3 to omega 6

Perilla Frutescens (aka Shiso) is as high in omega 3 as chia, but it will produce seed up north here unlike chia

Camelina sativa is also high in omega 3
 
Posts: 192
Location: SW of France
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Conrad Zirkwitz wrote:Sea Buckthorn seed is high in omegas and has a 1:1 ratio of omega 3 to omega 6

ScreenShot124.jpg
[Thumbnail for ScreenShot124.jpg]
ScreenShot123.jpg
[Thumbnail for ScreenShot123.jpg]
 
Posts: 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Walnut is the good source of omega 3.
 
Posts: 11
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Guy De Pompignac wrote:Hi,

i'm a bit concerned by the way to obtain omega-3 required by growing my own food


ALA : wallnuts are a good source (but i read that it contains to much Om6 in proportion). Flax, rapeseed, purslane too, but are annuals (and i'm lazy about annuals)

DHA : no veg sources (as far i know). Best converters are chicken throught their eggs. Flax feed chicken eggs (yellow part) have 2,2% of acid fats that are DHA. Cows via milk are not good converters *.
(flax enhanced eggs have also more ALA by ten folds)

EPA : hard to obtain !
- Wild Fish : best of non frigthned species are are (with g of EPA by 100g) :  Mackerel (1,2g), Sardine (1,1g)
- Some can be obtained by flax-feed chicken eggs (but not much : 0.3% of fatty acid)*
- Fishes on farm : EPA can be enhanced with flax seed, but only with vegan fishes (eg carp) cause carnivore fishes are bad converters of veg ALA (for example trout feed with flax seeds have just a 5% increase in EPA *). But i assume trout can be feed with flex-enhanced fishes


have you some good infos about chicken/fish fodder wich contains ALA and are more permaculturish than flax ?

For example i discovered that elaeagnus angustifolia seed oil contains 12.2 % ALA, but i dont know if chicken eat those, and if so if they eat or poop the seeds ...

Also snails should enhance omage 3 acids content


(i'm also interested by numbers on flax enhanced fishes)

* Source in french : http://books.google.fr/books?id=Ftl5JYK6GYEC&pg=PA232&lpg=PA232&dq=omega+3+poules+lin&source=bl&ots=CrYmRscioo&sig=OOID8FgVneHNvlPTccGlTZFF85o&hl=fr&ei=w2YlTZ2gEcep8QOes7jZAg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6&ved=0CEwQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q&f=true



your body knows how much EPA and DHA to make and creates it on an as-needed basis as long as there is enough of the precursor ALA. EPA and DHA from the DIET seems to be a bad things.

most whole plant foods have n-3 fatty acids in them. Flax is VERY HIGH in ALA.

Fish has lots of cholesterol.
 
gardener
Posts: 1870
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
243
forest garden urban
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Some fish has a lot of cholesterol, but as a blanket statement is isn't accurate.

It's also inaccurate to expect everyone's body to be able to convert ALA into DHA. Many of us just don't have the proper biological makeup to be able to efficiently make that conversion. I think that's going to be true of nearly any kind of dietary issue. Until there is a plant based source of DHA, I'm going to place more trust in animal sources for my own health.
 
I've never won anything before. Not even a tiny ad:
Native Bee Guide by Crown Bees
https://permies.com/wiki/105944/Native-Bee-Guide-Crown-Bees
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!