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Redhawk's methods of making the biodynamic preparations  RSS feed

 
gardener
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Instead of getting into a realm that exceeds the subject of this thread, I've started a new thread over in the soil forum where I will go through the how to get the soil organisms where we want them in the quantities we need them.
This new thread is called "getting the biology we want into our soil".

Redhawk
 
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:hau Annie, the cow dun preparation can be done either buried or not buried. If you are going to use the mason jar in the same manner as you would with the "traditional" cow horn, you just dig your trench and  set it upside down as if the jar was a horn, then bury it for the required 6 months.
If you are going to use my "set it on a shelf" method, you need to make the rim (from the top edge of the jar (shoulder of the jar that is the start of the "mouth")) the soil fill area, that is, the manure is packed in to the shoulder then the remaining jar section is filled with rich soil and this is moistened before the lid is screwed on loosely. Then just set it on a  shelf (preferably out of the light, or as much as possible out of the light),  check it in 6 weeks but usually mine sits for 8 weeks before use. Hope that helps you out.

Redhawk



I am able to make a full picture of the process now. Thank you!
 
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Are there any links to places where we can get these herbs and dried plants? Outside of Oak bark the others would be hard to come by in any quantity or would be very costly.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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hau Dennis, try these;

growers exchange

starwest

 
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Just want to pipe in and say these threads are the best concise resources on the net I’ve found. Thankyou so much from New Zealand! We’re reading here too.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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hau Annak, thank you, If you need something that I haven't covered, please let me know so I can build a thread addressing it/them.

Redhawk
 
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Dr Redhawk, Is it correct to say that we want a vigorous fungi under the soil. after all its the connection of plants to soil. then we want varieties of aerobic bacteria for the fungi to chew upon.
 
Dennis Bangham
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Julian,  IF you have time watch this compelling Ted Talk on how Fungi allow trees to talk to each other. Nature has much to teach us.  You are asking the good questions.

https://www.ted.com/talks/suzanne_simard_how_trees_talk_to_each_other/transcript?language=en

 
julian Gerona
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Dennis Bangham wrote:Julian,  IF you have time watch this compelling Ted Talk on how Fungi allow trees to talk to each other. Nature has much to teach us.  You are asking the good questions.

https://www.ted.com/talks/suzanne_simard_how_trees_talk_to_each_other/transcript?language=en



Thanks I'm watching it now
 
Bryant RedHawk
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julian Gerona wrote:Dr Redhawk, Is it correct to say that we want a vigorous fungi under the soil. after all its the connection of plants to soil. then we want varieties of aerobic bacteria for the fungi to chew upon.



I would say that is correct enough.
I am glad you watched Suzanne's talk on plant communication, it isn't limited to trees only though, and there is lots of cross communication going on through the fungal network as well.

Redhawk
 
This. Exactly this. This is what my therapist has been talking about. And now with a tiny ad:
Amazing garden tool - recommended by Sepp Holzer
https://permies.com/t/55266/Amazing-ploskorez-replace-usual-spade
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