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Simple trellis for green beans  RSS feed

 
Brenda Groth
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Location: North Central Michigan
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ordered POLE beans this year, OP so I can save seed and I will be trying a new trellis system..used lattice in the past and it is a bugger to remove the old vines..so..I'll see IF i can find some twin around otherwise wonder if crochet yarn would work, got a lot of that and it sure would be colofrul eh? Most of my yarns are natural fibers.
 
Alex Ames
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Location: Georgia
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My off centered, semi tepee style is working good so far with room for corn to
grow on one side of the bed. Beans are starting to run!
teepee-pole-bean-trellis.jpg
[Thumbnail for teepee-pole-bean-trellis.jpg]
 
Bob Kay
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Cool layout. I may try the trelis technique next year.
I've been using old bicycle rims atop tall posts (or poles)
I tie a string (natural twine) in each quadrant of the rim and let it dangle. 1 or 2 beans at the string.
It's amazing how the bees find the flowers.. I find beans in every hidden spot.
Best taste and growing is Blue Lake pole beans ... mmm .. pick 'em young.
In the fall I cut the plants at ground level and leave the roots in the ground to help with nitrogen (legumes),
plant and string goes to compost.
 
Nikki Thompson
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Charley Hoke wrote:Or you could tie a string across the bottom and tie the dangle strings to that.

I get a lot of wind here too, I actually cut the strings a foot or so longer than I need and lay it directly on the plant. it's amazing how quickly the plants grab hold and once they do wind is not an issue. I keep check on them and help them out till they get going, once they do I just let them go.

Something has been killing my cucumbers so I adopted this method with them and it seems to have helped. The cukes need more training and help but it seems to be working out well.


I can't believe this works with cucumbers!!! That is so awesome! I cannot wait to try it!
 
Nikki Thompson
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Charley Hoke wrote:I like growing green beans almost as much as I like eating them. We grow both pole beans and bush beans. I prefer the pole beans because if properly trellised take up less room, but have always detested the complicated trellis systems that I have used in the past. Last year I discovered a simpler way.

First, I keep my rows around 10 feet long and 2 feet apart; I put a wood steak at the ends of the rows sticking about 6 feet out of the ground. Then I tie a stick at the top of each steak to connect them. Then I tie an old piece of bailing twine to the cross stick and let it dangle down to the bean plant. I repeat this for each plant.

The beans will climb the twine and because it dangles, it makes it easier to harvest reaching between the plants as they sway freely. This concept makes it easier in the fall too. When the plant dies and if I have used twine made from jute or other natural fiber, I simply cut the twine loose from the cross stick, pull the bean plant from the ground and toss the whole thing in the compost pile.


I love this technique for light vining crops! I mean the idea of it anyways...I'm stoked about trying it though!!!
 
Destiny Hagest
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Location: Little Belt Mountains, MT
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I wish beans grew better in our climate - unfortunately, the only ones that do well aren't terribly suitable for eating, so we mainly just grow Austrian Winter pea as a soil amendment and chicken food. I just put up a woven stick fence around our garden to keep the ducks out, and I plan to seed the perimeter with peas, and maybe even beans if I'm feeling like throwing caution to the wind. I can't wait to see how they spread across the sticks in the fence!

I still have a lot to learn about gardening in general, but I love the idea of just letting the plants grow the way nature intended them, and I feel like the more simple the system, the more likely it is to succeed. I'm hoping to glean a bit more information from these videos from Marjory Wildcraft - I feel like I still have so much to learn.



Ugh, and BEANS! Talk about avoiding food inflation - I really hope I picked the right microclimate in my yard for them to be successful, but I feel like no amount of engineering short of earthworks will produce a healthy crop in my area.
 
Erin Blegen
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Location: Minnesota, United States
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I love seeing and gathering new trellising ideas. Last year for my pole beans I utilized one of our old wooden ladders and it worked beautifully.




I also took some of the 8-inch plastic pots from the local nursery, cut them down one side, and attached them around the bottom of the wooden fence posts in my garden. Filled them with dirt, planted pole beans- they then climbed up the fence post and onto the fence itself. You can see them to the right of my daughter).




 
Michael Bushman
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Location: Sacramento, CA
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This is the total opposite of simple. My wife and I have a compromise, I can grow and garden all I want as long as I make it look nice to her standards. We grow some heirloom yellow bean which I love because it is both tasty and effortless to find unlike green beans! There is a shot in early spring below before I built the second from and the first one is more recent. I am amazed at how much these beds produce considering they are built on top of a concrete patio. Simple construction from fence boards, 4x4 corners and one cross brace in the middle.



 
Craven Moorhead
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I have thought of putting up trellis on the East face of my house to capture/block the morning sun from the face of the house. Thought it might accomplish 2 things, good space to grow beans and peas and reduce the heat absorption on the house from the sun. What are your thoughts?
 
Mike Jay
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Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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I'm thinking of doing the same thing.  I have a 2 story sun-baked West side on my house and I'm debating a combination of a pergola and runner beans to cover up as much of the wall in July/August as possible.  I'm even debating putting planters on top of the pergola to let beans climb from there to the gutters above and shade the second floor.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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paul wheaton wrote:Would jute work as a baling twine?


You should be able to find either jute or manila bailing twine Paul, that is the "old school" bailing material.

Our farm supply store says they can get me the natural fiber bailing twine in the big balls just like they used to carry it.

or try these on line sources; agrisupply  and  sisal bailer twine  and  nursery supplies

Redhawk
 
Jean-Paul Calderone
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Location: Vermont, USA
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:
paul wheaton wrote:Would jute work as a baling twine?


You should be able to find either jute or manila bailing twine Paul, that is the "old school" bailing material.

Our farm supply store says they can get me the natural fiber bailing twine in the big balls just like they used to carry it.

or try these on line sources; agrisupply  and  sisal bailer twine  and  nursery supplies

Redhawk


The plant fiber twines are often treated with insecticides, fungicides, or rodent repellents.  If you're worried about such things (particularly in your compost pile), make sure you check what you're buying to see if it's treated or not.  It's not always obviously labeled.
 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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I have not been able to find any natural fiber twine that isn't treated for pest. However, the places I listed sell those that have been treated with biologically sound (true biodegradable into harmless components) pesticides.

For me this is an acceptable alternative to having to use plastics or other non biodegradable products for trellising or other uses.

The only place I use poly twine is on our fences that we move around, the poly twine has the strength and pliability needed for this use and it is reused as many times as possible.

It is unfortunate but it is the world we live in, most people who buy these products want them to last long enough as to be practical for use.
Straw and Hay bale twine needs to be durable enough and last long enough for that product to be used.
Rodents need to be encouraged to not chew through it as well. The option would be all poly or plastic binding twine, something I would hate to have as my only options.

Redhawk
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
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Some creative trellises in the community garden of Permacultuur Meppel:


 
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