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Simple trellis for green beans  RSS feed

 
pollinator
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Location: North Central Michigan
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ordered POLE beans this year, OP so I can save seed and I will be trying a new trellis system..used lattice in the past and it is a bugger to remove the old vines..so..I'll see IF i can find some twin around otherwise wonder if crochet yarn would work, got a lot of that and it sure would be colofrul eh? Most of my yarns are natural fibers.
 
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Location: Georgia
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My off centered, semi tepee style is working good so far with room for corn to
grow on one side of the bed. Beans are starting to run!
teepee-pole-bean-trellis.jpg
[Thumbnail for teepee-pole-bean-trellis.jpg]
 
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Cool layout. I may try the trelis technique next year.
I've been using old bicycle rims atop tall posts (or poles)
I tie a string (natural twine) in each quadrant of the rim and let it dangle. 1 or 2 beans at the string.
It's amazing how the bees find the flowers.. I find beans in every hidden spot.
Best taste and growing is Blue Lake pole beans ... mmm .. pick 'em young.
In the fall I cut the plants at ground level and leave the roots in the ground to help with nitrogen (legumes),
plant and string goes to compost.
 
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Charley Hoke wrote:Or you could tie a string across the bottom and tie the dangle strings to that.

I get a lot of wind here too, I actually cut the strings a foot or so longer than I need and lay it directly on the plant. it's amazing how quickly the plants grab hold and once they do wind is not an issue. I keep check on them and help them out till they get going, once they do I just let them go.

Something has been killing my cucumbers so I adopted this method with them and it seems to have helped. The cukes need more training and help but it seems to be working out well.


I can't believe this works with cucumbers!!! That is so awesome! I cannot wait to try it!
 
Nikki Thompson
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Charley Hoke wrote:I like growing green beans almost as much as I like eating them. We grow both pole beans and bush beans. I prefer the pole beans because if properly trellised take up less room, but have always detested the complicated trellis systems that I have used in the past. Last year I discovered a simpler way.

First, I keep my rows around 10 feet long and 2 feet apart; I put a wood steak at the ends of the rows sticking about 6 feet out of the ground. Then I tie a stick at the top of each steak to connect them. Then I tie an old piece of bailing twine to the cross stick and let it dangle down to the bean plant. I repeat this for each plant.

The beans will climb the twine and because it dangles, it makes it easier to harvest reaching between the plants as they sway freely. This concept makes it easier in the fall too. When the plant dies and if I have used twine made from jute or other natural fiber, I simply cut the twine loose from the cross stick, pull the bean plant from the ground and toss the whole thing in the compost pile.



I love this technique for light vining crops! I mean the idea of it anyways...I'm stoked about trying it though!!!
 
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I wish beans grew better in our climate - unfortunately, the only ones that do well aren't terribly suitable for eating, so we mainly just grow Austrian Winter pea as a soil amendment and chicken food. I just put up a woven stick fence around our garden to keep the ducks out, and I plan to seed the perimeter with peas, and maybe even beans if I'm feeling like throwing caution to the wind. I can't wait to see how they spread across the sticks in the fence!

I still have a lot to learn about gardening in general, but I love the idea of just letting the plants grow the way nature intended them, and I feel like the more simple the system, the more likely it is to succeed. I'm hoping to glean a bit more information from these videos from Marjory Wildcraft - I feel like I still have so much to learn.



Ugh, and BEANS! Talk about avoiding food inflation - I really hope I picked the right microclimate in my yard for them to be successful, but I feel like no amount of engineering short of earthworks will produce a healthy crop in my area.
 
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Location: Minnesota, United States
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I love seeing and gathering new trellising ideas. Last year for my pole beans I utilized one of our old wooden ladders and it worked beautifully.




I also took some of the 8-inch plastic pots from the local nursery, cut them down one side, and attached them around the bottom of the wooden fence posts in my garden. Filled them with dirt, planted pole beans- they then climbed up the fence post and onto the fence itself. You can see them to the right of my daughter).




 
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This is the total opposite of simple. My wife and I have a compromise, I can grow and garden all I want as long as I make it look nice to her standards. We grow some heirloom yellow bean which I love because it is both tasty and effortless to find unlike green beans! There is a shot in early spring below before I built the second from and the first one is more recent. I am amazed at how much these beds produce considering they are built on top of a concrete patio. Simple construction from fence boards, 4x4 corners and one cross brace in the middle.



 
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I have thought of putting up trellis on the East face of my house to capture/block the morning sun from the face of the house. Thought it might accomplish 2 things, good space to grow beans and peas and reduce the heat absorption on the house from the sun. What are your thoughts?
 
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I'm thinking of doing the same thing.  I have a 2 story sun-baked West side on my house and I'm debating a combination of a pergola and runner beans to cover up as much of the wall in July/August as possible.  I'm even debating putting planters on top of the pergola to let beans climb from there to the gutters above and shade the second floor.
 
gardener
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paul wheaton wrote:Would jute work as a baling twine?



You should be able to find either jute or manila bailing twine Paul, that is the "old school" bailing material.

Our farm supply store says they can get me the natural fiber bailing twine in the big balls just like they used to carry it.

or try these on line sources; agrisupply  and  sisal bailer twine  and  nursery supplies

Redhawk
 
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Location: Vermont, USA
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:

paul wheaton wrote:Would jute work as a baling twine?



You should be able to find either jute or manila bailing twine Paul, that is the "old school" bailing material.

Our farm supply store says they can get me the natural fiber bailing twine in the big balls just like they used to carry it.

or try these on line sources; agrisupply  and  sisal bailer twine  and  nursery supplies

Redhawk



The plant fiber twines are often treated with insecticides, fungicides, or rodent repellents.  If you're worried about such things (particularly in your compost pile), make sure you check what you're buying to see if it's treated or not.  It's not always obviously labeled.
 
Bryant RedHawk
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I have not been able to find any natural fiber twine that isn't treated for pest. However, the places I listed sell those that have been treated with biologically sound (true biodegradable into harmless components) pesticides.

For me this is an acceptable alternative to having to use plastics or other non biodegradable products for trellising or other uses.

The only place I use poly twine is on our fences that we move around, the poly twine has the strength and pliability needed for this use and it is reused as many times as possible.

It is unfortunate but it is the world we live in, most people who buy these products want them to last long enough as to be practical for use.
Straw and Hay bale twine needs to be durable enough and last long enough for that product to be used.
Rodents need to be encouraged to not chew through it as well. The option would be all poly or plastic binding twine, something I would hate to have as my only options.

Redhawk
 
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Some creative trellises in the community garden of Permacultuur Meppel:


 
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Location: Manotick (Ottawa), Ontario
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Charley Hoke wrote:I don't see why jute would not work as bailing twine, it is a very strong fiber.

I'm not sure if the twine I have gotten in the past was jute or not, but it was a natural fiber, at least it looked like it.

For the last couple of years the twine I have been getting is an orange plastic type.

This is an interesting article I found on jute
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-jute.htm



When I was homesteading in Ontario in the 70s, plastic baling twine was coming in, but natural sisal was still available. The jute twine I have on hand is softer and weaker than sisal. It's also not nearly as heavy as baling twine, but it works for one-season trellising.
 
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nice design! i used two bipods on each end, with an angular string from the top of one of the legs of one biped to the bottom of one of the legs to the other biped, this gives it stability so it doesn't just flatten. no having to hammer it into the ground. ill take a pic soon.
 
Posts: 317
Location: Clemson, SC ("new" Zone 8a)
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David Wieland wrote:

Charley Hoke wrote:I don't see why jute would not work as bailing twine, it is a very strong fiber.

I'm not sure if the twine I have gotten in the past was jute or not, but it was a natural fiber, at least it looked like it.

For the last couple of years the twine I have been getting is an orange plastic type.

This is an interesting article I found on jute
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-jute.htm



When I was homesteading in Ontario in the 70s, plastic baling twine was coming in, but natural sisal was still available. The jute twine I have on hand is softer and weaker than sisal. It's also not nearly as heavy as baling twine, but it works for one-season trellising.



What about woven hemp string?  Any thoughts...?
 
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I use cotton string (for crafting, although "bakery" string is perfect too if you double it) for my trellises. I've tried synthetics to reuse them from year to year but removing the vines is almost impossible so it`s a waste of time. This way I rip them down and throw them in the compost with the cotton string, after letting the rabbits eat the parts they want (they leave the central vines and string alone).
I am in the southern hemisphere going into winter and put in my winter crops (kales, chinese cabbage, peas, oat straw for the rabbits, artichokes... I`m in zone 9B) and noticed I had some volunteer beans from summer coming up. They could be almost anything, since I had red chinese asparagus beans (a kind of yard-long bean), rattlesnake beans, and scarlet runners all going at one point or another. I am going to let them come up and trellis them-- my trellises are anchored to cup hooks on the ends of the rafters coming off my back porch into the garden, it adds some aerial space and brings plants into an area that is normally too shady (they catch the sun as they grow upward).

i also just planted a few of these guys. They are a dry bean, nobody in the house really likes to eat them, but they have a nice big leaf and are showy. We`ll see if they come up.
 
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  Bottom left is sweet potatoes... little grasshoppers are starting to chop 'em ... grrrr.[/quote wrote: 

Now if only a way to train sweet potatoes over the fish   Nice aquaponics description.  How many pumps are you using?

 
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This is great and I do something similar. I find a flattish rock and tie the end of the jute twine to the rock as a means to weigh down the twine and also double as a heat sink for the cooler maritime nights. Runner beans are the best in the pnw.
 
pollinator
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I like hemp twine, but I think the better kind lasts too long for a seasonal application, after which it is expected to compost.

I love using compostable structures for my vining fruits and veg. So much easier than trying to pick out twine.

-CK
 
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We've been short on time of late, so "for now" when I stupidly impulse purchased some Knight pea starters at our local Farmer's Market, we took a square top wire frame that we found on the property and did the string dangle method with some jute even though we had set aside fallen wood for some teepees.  Then the rains came, and where I put the starters inside wasn't very smart, so once in the ground they died despite some attempt on my part to prevent that.

Shortly after getting the starters in, we started planting the actual seeds we had bought this year.  (Our entire schedule is late this year.  Late to order, late with freezing night temps, et al.)  I am hoping to build the teepees soonish because the corn is also slow starting, so my hope of three sistering might not work this year, and the wire frame we found is only maybe two feet above ground in height.  Still, the wire will work for the short term if I get distracted with other things, then I can retie the thread to the teepee.

Our scarlett runner beans and black turtle beans are just breaking ground, both sets direct sown in our first hugel bed that ended up settling much lower than we thought it would.  We've only had time for the one so far, so what little we've planted save some pumpkins have all gone in that bed.  We only had a budget of $20 for seeds this year, though we bought a few herb starters (mostly as companions, but some will be used if we don't kill them-basil, rosemary, lavender, parsley) with the one pea starter I mentioned above.

We're very new at this.  I haven't done any kitchen gardening since I still lived in the mulltifamily home my maternal grandparents owned in Southern NJ aside from a one time cherry tomato in a container that was a gift.  My other half has never done any gardening at all until he met me.   He is very firm in his belief that his thumbs will forever be black, but he doesn't mind helping with direction.  I have forgotten much of what I knew back then, so I research a lot, but I often feel like I'm the blind leading the blind.  *chuckles*
 
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I have been trying to figure out how to make a trellis that will go over my 1 story little house onto which to train hops. They will grow more than 20 feet, make great beer, are wonderful animal feed, and would help to shade my northern New Mexico 'estate'.
Has anyone done this, seen this, or have great ideas??
 
Mike Jay
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Laura, I've heard people suggest that if you have gutters, you can hang string from the edge to train the vines up.  Once they reach the roof, who knows where they'll go but I'd assume they would sprawl out.  Hopefully they wouldn't damage shingles with their grabbers...
 
Chris Kott
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Hops will tear the siding off of buildings. I have no doubt that it would easily dismantle your house, given time.

If you are determined to use hops in such a way, I strongly suggest that the trellis be free-standing and the plants not be allowed to touch the building at all.

-CK
 
Mike Jay
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Good to know, thanks Chris!!
 
Laura Hays
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Thank you, Chris!
Guess I will find some other really long type of climber. Beans, roses, etc.
 
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How does it stand up to wind? We've had whole trellis blown over by wind once the beans are grown to the top of our trellis>
 
Mike Jay
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Hi Jackie, which trellis are you asking about? 
 
Jackie Neufeld
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The trellis that has a frame with strings hanging from it. It was on the permies daylyish about a month ago.  It was a tall rectangular frame 10 ft by 2 ft wide and about 6 ft high. Uses strings hanging down rather than poles.

https://permies.com/t/76871/trellises
 
There's a way to do it better - find it. -Edison. A better tiny ad:
DIY solar dehydrator - have you built one?
https://permies.com/t/90672/DIY-solar-dehydrator-built
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