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Brice Moss
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Location: rainier OR
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the modern user friendly linux distro's have options to install linux alongside your current operating system. so you can keep our currently installed office in case yo have compatibility issues while you transition.

open office and libre office both do very well at reading MS docs and I find almost no compatibility issues if I save as an older MS format to send to MS using folks. I haven't had a serious issue between OO chart and MS excel for years
 
                                
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Location: Eastern Colorado, USA
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Denise wrote:
I am now of the habit of saving almost nothing on my hard driving -- putting almost all saved items on a memory stick, because the less you have saved on your hard drive, the faster your computer runs. 


To only a small extent, and only if your hard drive is really full.  The real speed bottleneck is when your RAM fills and your OS must write to HD, called a "page file" in Windoze.  More RAM is almost always the answer.

Denise wrote:
I'm going to want to keep Excel and Word, not because they are great, but for compatibility issues.  Are they going to work with pclinuxos?


They could, but why would you want to?  OpenOffice works with all the MS formats, and it's free.  LibreOffice is a new suite out, and it too works with MS Office formats.  Both give you the option of saving files in their own (open standard) formats as well.

Denise wrote:
Also, if I install pclinuxos and dump windows, will I still need my Norton Internet Security subscription OR can I just let it lapse?


You will not need any sort of anti-virus software whatsoever.  (That's to say nothing of Norton being the worst software known to man...)  There are a couple of antivirus programs for Linux, like KlamAV, but no one I know even bothers with it.  Most problems of this nature arise from two things: weak home network security, and opening unknown email attachments.  Thus, most virus problems with Windoze aren't necessarily the fault of Microsoft, but user error.  Still, Windoze attacks won't affect Linux systems.


Okay... that said, let's talk distros.  There are hundreds of Linux distros out there, and all have their rabid fans.  I am no different.  I'll say that I like Fedora, and don't use anything else. 

But I wouldn't recommend it to a newbie.  For people brand new to Linux, I'd say try Kubuntu, which is a version of Ubuntu that will feel a little more familiar to Windows users.  The install is newbie friendly, and their help forums are excellent, with more users than I've seen elsewhere.  If you don't have a real live person to teach you, Kubuntu is the way to go.  Almost painless. 
 
Derek Brewer
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Location: Hatfield, PA
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My Background: I'm a technologist that's worked extensively with Windows (starting with 95 to present) and Linux (my dotcom was based on Redhat 3, I think).

I like the original post about refurbing computers with Linux for kids. I did a similar project back in college called Connected Kids. We worked with the local housing authority to deliver turn-key edutainment systems using recycled computers from the college running Linux. It worked great and gave a lot of kids access to computers that they wouldn't have otherwise had. We saved a lot of time by having one of the newer/beefier systems run as the server and the rest of the desktops were just dumb clients that booted off the network to display the programs from that server. It worked quite well, actually and kids even had their own accounts.

That being said, MS isn't bad. For business purposes I'd be hard pressed to recommend anything but the latest hardware running the latest version of Windows. Why? Integration. I can use the latest version of Windows and practically all modern software will run on it. Office integrates seamlessly with itself and with web services like sharepoint. Exchange (email, group sharing) is a wonder in many ways and there really aren't any open-source alternatives to Exchange working with outlook.

Looking at the long-term aspects of computing, Windows has support. You can call up someone and get help when something breaks, as will happen with any complicated business system (including Linux ones). Windows support goes far in a time fashion as well. XP will loose support in 2014 (source). I'd like to see how many 10 year old versions of Linux have any support at all... or even a broken upgrade path.

Now windows isn't perfect. It's more prone to viruses and other malware (typically the users fault these days, though) and does suffer bloat pretty badly. I typically reinstall my windows computer once every year or so, but that is because I install a lot of software and experiment a lot as well.

I liken it to a project car. If you're constantly tinkering with it, upgrading it, installing new modules, etc... it's going to be more prone to breakage. You probably shouldn't use that as your daily driver.

Now enough with the windows praise. I don't think it's good for home users unless you need it for some reason. Those needs could be gaming, a particular program that doesn't run well virtualized, or compatibility with your company's systems. I'm sure there are others, but those are a few.

If you don't have a particular need like that, though, go Linux. It is more stable for home use, and it's less likely to get crap put on it (by the user or otherwise). I pretty much only set up Linux systems for my non-computer savvy friends and family and, you know what? I have very few "support" calls anymore. 

My preferred home and office Linux distro is Ubuntu (regular or server). I've found it to be the most user friendly with the best software/feature set. For a home NAS, I would probably use freenas or opennas. For a firewall, I would probably roll with Ubuntu, but there are a few others that are excellent and much more user firendly in that department (IPCop, Smoothwall). Right now I run a netgear router with a custom linux version flashed to it. Very slick.

Side note: someone mentioned that all printers need special driver in windows. This isn't strictly true. Most printers will work with the generic PostScript driver. You just have to know how to configure it.
 
                                
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Location: Eastern Colorado, USA
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TheLight wrote:
XP will loose support in 2014 (source). I'd like to see how many 10 year old versions of Linux have any support at all... or even a broken upgrade path.


Well... I don't think MS wanted to support XP that long.  They were forced into it because millions of XP users refused to go buy all new hardware just so they could have the bloated piece of crap that was Vista, which really offered little in the way of under-hood improvement anyway.  I know people still using XP, which is pretty stable for an MS product since SP3.  In any case, it's about money -- whether spent on hardware, or the new OS.  Spending $1000 to get a few new bells & whistles is an obstacle.

Peripheral manufacturers like Logitech refused to write new drivers for Vista, so you had to go buy new webcams if you wanted Vista.  It pissed off a lot of consumers.

Contrast to the Linux distros, which are free to upgrade, and run on your same old hardware.  Often, the new versions run faster on your old hardware than the previous versions.  (My old computer got faster every time I upgraded Fedora Core from version 4 all the way to 9.) That's something you can't say about MS operating systems.  So there's absolutely no good reason to be using a 10 year old Linux.  There's no good reason to run a 1-year old Linux, since it's not a financial decision. 
 
John Polk
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No, you will not need Norton with Linux.
 
Len Ovens
pollinator
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TheLight wrote:
That being said, MS isn't bad. For business purposes I'd be hard pressed to recommend anything but the latest hardware running the latest version of Windows. Why? Integration. I can use the latest version of Windows and practically all modern software will run on it. Office integrates seamlessly with itself and with web services like sharepoint. Exchange (email, group sharing) is a wonder in many ways and there really aren't any open-source alternatives to Exchange working with outlook.


That being said... the Vancouver Law courts (Supreme, family and provincial) use windows... but not MS office. They all have open office on them. All of the downloadable law forms are *.doc not *.docx. (thankfully) I used to be able to read docx files fine, but the last one... All the words were there, but scrambled. I can write docx files, but there are some features I can't write (like double spacing) that are fine with a doc.

Ubuntu.... and Gnome coming up... The latest ubuntu has the unity desktop. I think the new user might find it frustrating. It is great if the user only ever uses 10 applications or less, but using an application not on the sidebar is not intuitive. There is no longer a main menu. Kubuntu or xubuntu might be best. Gnome2 is fine but the next gnome3 will be very different. Ubuntu Studio which is based on ubuntu classic (gnome2) will be switching to the xubuntu base for this reason as well as having a desktop that uses fewer resources.

For long term support with unbuntu stick to the LTS versions.
 
Casey Halone
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I like taking busted laptops and using them as desktops. amazing how folks toss them. i got one with some missing keys and a bad hinge. i removed the hinge, built a simple picture frame around it, mounted it to the wall and attached a KB and mouse.

just something to watch out for! also quite low on power use too.
 
                            
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Refurbishing laptops makes sense, but many of the old desktop machines simply waste too much electricity.  Sure, you're keeping stuff out of the landfills if you go on using them, but you have to weigh that against the impact of everything that goes into generating the power they use.

My advice: find a good PC recycling center (one that actually recovers the materials rather than shipping them off to be dumped in a heap somewhere in China or the third world).
 
Casey Halone
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OH OH OH, i dont know how i forgot this one.

take apart the hard drives, and use the magnets for all sorts of neat things. you can hurt your fingers with a couple so dont say i didnt warn ya!

I like screwing them to the wall or shelf above my work bench to hold tools within reach and not screw around with trying to get it in a hole or on a peg.

also AMAZING REFRIGERATOR magnets they are.
 
Brice Moss
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Corky wrote:
Refurbishing laptops makes sense, but many of the old desktop machines simply waste too much electricity.  Sure, you're keeping stuff out of the landfills if you go on using them, but you have to weigh that against the impact of everything that goes into generating the power they use.

My advice: find a good PC recycling center (one that actually recovers the materials rather than shipping them off to be dumped in a heap somewhere in China or the third world).


not so true the power requirements of a new dual or quad  core machine are much higher than a 4-5 year old system, yes the newer computers can do more with the same wttage but all the idle time while you are reading a web-page uses about the same amount of power.

you can reduce your power consumption a lot though by turning off power to your computer at the power bar while not using it and only having it on while you are using it.
 
                            
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Good point, Brice.  I was thinking of towers vs. laptops or one of my mini-ITX machines. 
 
                                
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Linux running on a laptop is the most frugal way to go.
Linux is free (please support your favorites) and laptops
use very little electricity compared to desktops.

There are many different "Linux" distributions or distros
as we users call them.  Here is a site  http://distrowatch.com/
to browse and find something that sounds good to you (ymmv)
what the  heck, try them all cause they are FREE.
To get help you should try the forums that are part of
each distribution.  Forums are cool, eh?

I live at following site, IRC is the application.
FreeNode is the server and #PortalesLinux is the channel.
You can figure that out and I will try to help or I can find
help.  I will also give you my email address if you get to
#PortalesLinux  or you can pm me here?

Craigslist Forums are good:
http://craigslist.org/forums/?forumID=1991 ; That is the
Linux forum.

Printers, Laser printers are much much cheaper to run
than inkjets.  We have a 20 year old HP LaserJet 4 that
get 5000 to 6000 sheets per toner cartridge ($50/$60)
There are printer forums too.
Need to fix your printer?  These guys are great, and I mean
they know how to treat the customer.
http://www.fixyourownprinter.com/

Have fun.
Linux:  Free as in gratis, free as in Libre.

Peace, Bob
 
                                          
Posts: 4
Location: Plymouth, NH (Until Dec. 2011 when I hit the road)
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It's great to hear from you pro-Linux permies. . .

My old laptop has recently become nonfunctional as a laptop, though I am in search of a salvaged energy-star monitor to convert the old faithful into a desktop.

I just purchased a new windows-free laptop (I'm a student and a laptop is very useful), and this saved me money and from stress and frustration. Excited.

I go with Ubuntu at the moment, but love hearing about why other folks choose other distros. . .

Anyway, time to go work outside in the rain!
 
Len Ovens
pollinator
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Well, Ubuntu 11.04 introduced the "Unity" desktop... not very nice as it hides most of the software from the user... one actually has to run software just to locate and run it... no main menu. There is a list of often used applications down the left side (mac style?) and these are not too hard to use if there are not too many. Great for a netbook (though not mine thanks) or kiosk type load. However, they left the option of "ubuntu classic" with the Gnome desktop.... which from any comments, most people chose.

Last week 11.10 came out and I let it upgrade my netbook.... big mistake! Unity is now the only option and it feels that all windows should be full desktop with no way of shrinking it so I can see two windows at once. Hmm, ok, drop xubuntu on top. Gets me my main menu back (good) but all windows are still fullscreen

So I just spent many hours backing up my netbook and reloading it from scratch with xubuntu... much better. I have my computer back.

The upside... I have more disk space as I got rid of the windows partition I never use   I also have a clean install, just xubuntu without something under it.

Anyway, All this to tell people... if you are switching to Linux and thinking of using ubuntu.... make sure you try the live dvd first. Xubuntu would be better for the older machine (or to make a newer one faster) and Kubuntu will be the slicker one with all the bells and whistles.... I am sure someone will come up with a "Gubuntu" too now that ubuntu doesn't offer that any more.

 
Casey Halone
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which would be the best transition for an OSX user?
 
                                
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Casey,  Try one of the distros (distributions) with the KDE setup.
Ubuntu has a Kbuntu
Fedora and Linux Mint have KDE releases.
Many other choices out there also.

Remember that you can preview these with a Live CD,
no danger to your present system until you click on install.
In fact there are many people who just run from the Live
CD, they never install the Operating System.  Very safe
computing but a bit of a pain in the neck.

There is a Linux forum on Craigslist, lots of good people there.

Peace, Bob
 
Denise Lehtinen
Posts: 102
Location: Tampa, Florida zone 9A
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Okay.  I am a little confused.

I downloaded a file called pclinuxos-kde-2011.6 a while ago.
I finally wrote the disk image today.
Something in the instructions said to defrag my computer, which I have done.

But now the instructions say to run InstallPCLinuxOS, but I don't see that anywhere and the download for KDE at http://www.pclinuxos.com/?page_id=180 just wants to give me the program I have already.  (It took ages to download the first time.  I don't really want to do it again, if I don't have to.)

I'd really appreciate it, if someone would point me in the right direction.  What should I do next?
 
Len Ovens
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Denise wrote:
Okay.  I am a little confused.

I downloaded a file called pclinuxos-kde-2011.6 a while ago.
I finally wrote the disk image today.
Something in the instructions said to defrag my computer, which I have done.

But now the instructions say to run InstallPCLinuxOS, but I don't see that anywhere and the download for KDE at http://www.pclinuxos.com/?page_id=180 just wants to give me the program I have already.  (It took ages to download the first time.  I don't really want to do it again, if I don't have to.)

I'd really appreciate it, if someone would point me in the right direction.  What should I do next?


Have you booted your computer from the cd you made? I am not familiar with pcLinuxOS myself, but most install CDs expect you to boot from them. You may have to change the boot order in your bios (mostly this means hit delete while booting and a blue screen with lots of options comes up) to make the CD first... if there is no cd in the drive it will boot from the first hard drive or floppy (if you have such a device). When it boots there will be a screen of options that comes up and sits there for a bit. Often the first will boot to a live cd version of the OS so you can try it out straight from the cd without changing anything on your hard drive. Another option will be to install. Most often it is also possible to install from the live version normally from an install icon on the desktop.

I have been using Linux from the early 90s (OS/2 before that with GEM and DRDOS before that.... notice nothing that M$ made ) and so I realise I may be using words that are plain to me, but may not be to you. linux has had "live" CDs pretty much from the start. Getting them to run was something else The early ones would boot from the CDROM.. and then expect you to tell it where the CDrom was so it could load... They are much better now as hardware has become standardised and easier to detect. Linux used to be a programmer's toy, but is now easier to use than windows... not sure about a Mac... In my opinion.

Anyway, if I have used words that don't mean anything to you... let me know... it does not mean you are dim, it means I am.... I can talk to computers but not people so much
 
Cris Bessette
gardener
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Denise wrote:
Okay.  I am a little confused.

I downloaded a file called pclinuxos-kde-2011.6 a while ago.
I finally wrote the disk image today.
Something in the instructions said to defrag my computer, which I have done.

But now the instructions say to run InstallPCLinuxOS, but I don't see that anywhere and the download for KDE at http://www.pclinuxos.com/?page_id=180 just wants to give me the program I have already.  (It took ages to download the first time.  I don't really want to do it again, if I don't have to.)

I'd really appreciate it, if someone would point me in the right direction.  What should I do next?


I've used PCLinuxOS for almost a year now. Its the easiest Linux I've used.
As for installing, Len pretty much covered that.

You should be able to turn on the computer with the CD in the drive and it should start the computer on the PCLinuxOS operating system.

If this is not happening you will have to make the CD drive the "1st boot device".

Anyways, here is a pictorial install tutorial:
http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/install_pclinuxos_1.html


 
Denise Lehtinen
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I did manage to get the Linux to run by putting in the CD.  I didn't click on the button yet to install it on my hard drive because I am hoping not to have to put it on there at all.  (Keeping the speed of my computer up by not saving things on my hard drive is important to me.)

What I'm hoping to do next is to connect to the Internet when I am in the Linux OS.  I'm thinking to put copies of Firefox, Chrome, and K-Meleon on a thumb drive and see if maybe that is enough to connect me.  But Verizon is my provider so maybe I need to copy over some of that software, too.

I'd like to get to play around with Linux and see how I like it (and get used to it) without committing to it at all.  I'm hoping that moving over enough software to a thumb drive to let me try to do the things I usually do on my computer is an easy way to do this.  Just remove it and the CD, and restart my computer to go back to what I have now. 

Another possibility I've thought of is to install the Linux on one of those thumb drives along with enough software to get me on the Internet.  I have a vague memory hearing that those thumb drives are really hard drives (or something like that) and not the latest version of floppy disks as I usually treat them as.  Those drives are really cheap and if I get a new one and dedicate it to the Linux experiment, and then later decide I don't like it, then I just have some extra memory storage -- something that always comes in handy somewhere.

But all of this is uncharted territory for me, so I'm happy for any support you can give.  Are any of these possibilities good ones?  Am I missing anything important?

 
Len Ovens
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Denise wrote:
I did manage to get the Linux to run by putting in the CD.  I didn't click on the button yet to install it on my hard drive because I am hoping not to have to put it on there at all.  (Keeping the speed of my computer up by not saving things on my hard drive is important to me.)

What I'm hoping to do next is to connect to the Internet when I am in the Linux OS.  I'm thinking to put copies of Firefox, Chrome, and K-Meleon on a thumb drive and see if maybe that is enough to connect me.  But Verizon is my provider so maybe I need to copy over some of that software, too.

I'd like to get to play around with Linux and see how I like it (and get used to it) without committing to it at all.  I'm hoping that moving over enough software to a thumb drive to let me try to do the things I usually do on my computer is an easy way to do this.  Just remove it and the CD, and restart my computer to go back to what I have now. 

Another possibility I've thought of is to install the Linux on one of those thumb drives along with enough software to get me on the Internet.  I have a vague memory hearing that those thumb drives are really hard drives (or something like that) and not the latest version of floppy disks as I usually treat them as.  Those drives are really cheap and if I get a new one and dedicate it to the Linux experiment, and then later decide I don't like it, then I just have some extra memory storage -- something that always comes in handy somewhere.

But all of this is uncharted territory for me, so I'm happy for any support you can give.  Are any of these possibilities good ones?  Am I missing anything important?




Only missed one other possible thing to try. Most run from a disk distros will allow a file to be placed on the current drive without getting rid of anything that can be used as a small linux drive to store whatever on. Might put the packages you want there. The usb stick would work but remember they are slower than a normal hard drive... some of them not much. This is not a problem for testing just remember not to think Linux is slow because of that. I have a 40G memory stick... err well actually it is the drive from an old laptop with a usb plug. That works just fine... in fact I used it as an alternate boot for a while. In other words get the biggest one you can find. There is a windows progam (Linux one too but that may not help you) that will put a bootable CD/DVD onto a memory stick and makes it bootable. I don't know how generic it is. Pretty sure it works with debian derivatives like ubuntu etc. Not so sure about others.
 
                                
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Denise,  You have everything you need on that Live CD
to get to the internet.  If you make a bootable thumb drive
it will have everything you need also.

Please tell us what Distribution you are using and how
you connect to the internet, cable modem, router etc.
If you use Ethernet (that cable that plugs into a modem
or router it will connect automagicly.

Peace, Bob
 
Denise Lehtinen
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I did manage to get on the internet shortly after I posted here.  (Sometimes that's how it seems to happen...soon as I ask a question...poof there is the answer.)

The only thing that is confusing me now is that the C: drive doesn't seem to be accessible while in Linux.  Maybe I just need to Wiki computer operating system, because I'm doing stuff without really understanding what I am doing (I hate that). 

It seems easy now to copy the files I'm attached to in the old system and see if they will run in the Linux one.  I am hesitating to do that because I'm not understanding what the new file directory program means by 'File:'.  If I store a file there, where am I putting in?

I probably will go the bootable thumb drive option.  I think I saw the button to click to make one of those.  At least then I will be in familiar territory.  I can move files onto it (or download onto it) and know what I am doing with those files.

Sorry no real questions just now.  I'm hoping that talking it out here will help.
 
                                
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Denise,  Somewhere on that KDE you have there is a place that will list the various file systems.
If you are running the Live CD it should be on your desktop.

You should be able to VIEW all your files on the windows HD.  You should be able to copy them
and move them to a thumb drive or where ever.  Do NOT try to run any windows applications.  Ever.
Please read that last sentence again.  You would most probably destroy the Linux install and if running
from the Live CD just cause general havoc.

PCLOS forum, there is a section all about running from a Live CD or a USB stick:
http://www.pclinuxos.com/forum/

I will download a PCLinux KDE .iso now so I can see what you see, well more or less.

You have a PM from me.

Peace, Bob
 
Denise Lehtinen
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Thanks for the help.  I really am slowly figuring things out.  I read through the Wiki today and understood some of it.

Only thing is I wish there were an easy way to do is to install the PCLinuxOS onto the thumb drive.  I don't really want to partition my hard drive because I am concerned about slowing down my computer for when I play that silly MMORPH I'm addicted to.  (I don't care about speed otherwise.)

I think I read that this OS only needs 1 Gigabyte of memory, and this thumb drive has just shy of 4.  So it ought to have the space to do it, and then I could update files in a permanent way without taking up space on my hard drive.  This would let me try and figure out if it will do for me all the things I want it to before I commit to it.

The tool for making a bootable thumb drive seems to think I am doing that because I have been tinkering with the OS and want to save my own version. 

Otherwise, I am concerned with the auto-updating feature of the OS.  I really like to get to Choose when that happens.  One good thing about Norton is that it was pretty easy to set it to Reminding me every 5 days that it is time to update it.

I like things easy.  (Choose this option from a list.) and I like control.  (only do things when I tell you to)

Maybe it is this version of Linux.  Maybe Ubuntu will be more my speed.
 
                                
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Denise,  Keep going, it is worth the effort.

Here is the place for any and all information:
http://www.pclinuxos.com/forum/

The software update can (should) be setup by the user after installation.
Remember that as long as you are using a Live CD there
will be no updates.  Usually that is not a problem.  You can
always download and burn a new CD in a month or two.
Nothing you do when using the Live CD will get to your HD
(Hard Drive), nothing.  Live CD is the safest computing you
can do.


You can use your Live CD until you feel comfortable enough to
go ahead and install.  My wife has to keep a Windows partition
because of her work (m$ centric university) but she is running
Linux 99% of the time.  So you can "dual boot" if you need to.
If your computer is still under warranty by all means keep that
Windows alive, or put it all on a DVD.

I have the ability to run the PCLinuxOS from the Live CD now
so I should be able to help a bit more.

Peace, Bob





 
                                
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Here is a place to chat with me and others in real time.

http://webchat.freenode.net/?channels=portaleslinux
Pick a name and then type questions at the bottom.

Be patient, we will answer, ask for a specific time maybe.

We can save Mr. Wheaton some bandwidth?
 
Len Ovens
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bobmckeand wrote:
Here is a place to chat with me and others in real time.

http://webchat.freenode.net/?channels=portaleslinux
Pick a name and then type questions at the bottom.

Be patient, we will answer, ask for a specific time maybe.

We can save Mr. Wheaton some bandwidth?



Yes and no. There may be others who can learn something from it if it stays as a recording of the process. Installing Linux as a way to save on churn might be a good thread all on it's own.
 
Denise Lehtinen
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Well, I have PCLinuxOS on my hard drive now.  (My Windows OS was corrupted yesterday, and suddenly installing Linux became the best option that I saw.)

 
Len Ovens
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Denise wrote:
Well, I have PCLinuxOS on my hard drive now.  (My Windows OS was corrupted yesterday, and suddenly installing Linux became the best option that I saw.)


And? How it goes? Right click often gives more options... same as windows.
 
Cris Bessette
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Denise wrote:
Well, I have PCLinuxOS on my hard drive now.  (My Windows OS was corrupted yesterday, and suddenly installing Linux became the best option that I saw.)



Almost a year ago I had the same problem- My Windows system was corrupted, and I couldn't afford the $200+ for another copy of Windows. I found PCLinuxOS on the net, installed it, and have been using it ever since.
I've used Linux on and off for over 10 years, but only in the last few years has it gotten good enough where it can do everything I did under windows, and just as easily.
 
Denise Lehtinen
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That's cool to hear.  I really am basically satisfied with PCLinux-- it is doing all the essentials.

But I have one item on my wish list that maybe you know how to do.

I'd like to be able to continually auto refresh (at least one of my browsers).  Do you know how to do this? 

I have found the add-ons for Firefox, but they didn't do the trick.  I haven't seen anyway to do this with Konqueror.  I tried to install another browser called K-Meleon with the Wine protocols, but didn't succeed at that either.  (The version of K-Meleon I had been using in Windows had Continuous Reloading as an option in the drop down menus at the top of the screen... it doesn't get easier than that.)

But I don't know what to try next now.
 
                                
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Denise Lehtinen
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I installed WINE earlier, and finally just now dared to download the regular K-Meleon into it.

Earlier I tried a non-standard version of this browser without success.  But in that process I kept seeing the name SeaMonkey... and K-Meleon uses both Firefox and SeaMonkey as its base... so I thought it just might work.

It is working... at least well enough.  It's not likely ever to play that video on the top of this page.  But I have my auto-refresh function in it...just like I wanted.
 
Denise Lehtinen
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By the way, I just adore K-Meleon... its the most user friendly browser I know of.  All the settings I ever want are available to me in the drop down menus.  I don't need to bother with add-ons.  It doesn't have alot of extra code bogging it down, so it is relatively fast, too.

Well, I have it back now -- at least a little bit -- nice to have an old friend in this new and strange Linux world.
 
Denise Lehtinen
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This is an update.

PCLinux is working great and I just saw an email from Norton for a renewal that I got to ignore.

Thanks for holding my hand a bit while I was getting started.
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
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