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What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!  RSS feed

 
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That's it!

Now who wants to play?
 
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Wow. Wild guess. My dad made his own when i was a kid (1970's). Thanks for the memory.
 
Anne Miller
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So what are these?







 
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Ooh, good ones  Anne!
The first one you put corn in and it takes the kernels off the cob, I don't know it's name.
The second one does a lot of weird things, including lift the lids off hot cast iron pans, I WANT one!! I have seen variants of that sort of thing at antique places, but not that exact type.
This game is hazardous, makes me want to go antique store shopping  :)

I have a shoulder injury and am not up to digging up the weird crap I have down in my barn still packed, there's a few WTF things there. One is a tool I took to an antique tractor show, had a good argument going between a crowd of old men before they decided what it was, a tool for doing links on the old type tire chains, that were outlawed many years ago, because the lock links that this tool opened would break and the chains came off, killed a bunch of people before they made them illegal "sometime before the war."  Another is a homemade/custom thing that no one has ever figured out what the plan for it was, it's a turntable, with crank to spin it, but no way to hold anything on it, and two roller bars to feed something on (that won't stay on it if it's cranked.) Very odd. I'll probably modify it into a cream separator one of these years.

If I have time, I'll rat through some stuff I have here, see if any of it is worth taking pics of :)
 
Anne Miller
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This has been really fun finding pictures of things I don't known what they are.

I am sure you are right about both of them.  #2 was called "Brides multi tool"

I hope others will continue this game as it has been fun.
 
Pearl Sutton
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I agree, this is fun! I'm having a hard week, too much to do that I mostly don't want to, and sick and in a LOT of pain. This is being my only brain break.

"Bride's multi-tool" is um.. quite a concept. I could get crude with that...

Hm.. pictures of stuff I don't have... now that's a thought. I glanced through my tools, I have weird looking stuff, but to me it's basic tools, just old weird ones,stuff Harbor Freight doesn't sell. Didn't see  any I wanted to photo. I'll look for pics next time I can sit down.

Keep it up folks!!
 
wayne fajkus
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This will be too easy for some. A must have for any homesteader.  Its part of a few pieces.

20180731_210234-480x640.jpg
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Anne Miller
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Wayne, does the name of this item have a "x' in it?
 
wayne fajkus
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No. Cool that its not obvious.  I guess its something every homestead needs, if they knew it existed.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Wayne: I'm guessing part of a cream separator....?

An assortment to figure out:
The thing on the right (sorry, didn't take a pic of what the end of the stick looks like, has a rock on it. It's packed, can't get a better picture) I bought it for my birthday a couple years ago. And those cool cast iron candle holders...


Something of my dad's tools that I moved:


Something I saw displayed on a wall that I sent a pic to my favorite ex, offering to use it on him :) (wonderful man, there's a difference between who you love, and who you can live with, unfortunately.) He was highly amused :)

 
wayne fajkus
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Not correct Pearl.

It has a "U" in the name Anne
 
wayne fajkus
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Second pic is metal shear?

Last pic is bideazer (sp?) . Used to castrate.
 
wayne fajkus
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Didnt look at last picture close. Not a bideazer.  

Does it cut chicken beaks?

Or chicken legs?
 
wayne fajkus
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I can say last item is a ridgely trimmer. So far i havent found out "what" it trims. They made scissors and wallpaper trimmers.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Second does not cut metal. Blade is shorter, and duller.

I sent the Ridgely thing to Chris thinking it was a castrator, the lady who was at the desk at the place said "oh, that's not what it is!" Looks like one, don't it? But no, doesn't cut testicles, or anything on chickens. It's about 3 foot long, would decapitate a chicken quick :) But not chickens.

 
wayne fajkus
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Im overthinking, but #3 seems like something slides throught it. Otherwise why not have it open like snips or bolt cutters. Of course it could just be a bad design and why you dont see them anymore.

It could cut sausage into links. Maybe Electrical wire.

Maybe it trims bear claws. I'm grasping now. Lol

What about dehorning a cow?
 
wayne fajkus
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Is number 1 a fondue pot?
 
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wayne fajkus wrote:This will be too easy for some. A must have for any homesteader.  Its part of a few pieces.

Steam juicer.
 
wayne fajkus
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3 could also be a pipe cutter. As you tighten it down, start spinning it. Like those little copper pipe cutters.

Someone get it right. It's driving me nuts!
 
wayne fajkus
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You got it jd. Nice job. That piece allows steam up though the center to steam the fruit. The juice drops down and collects in the same piece.

I juiced strawberries which i then mixed 1:1 with sugar. Boiled it down to a syrup.  Had it on my pancakes yesterday!
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Anne Miller
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Pearl's #3:  Bull horn cutter

Pearls #1: looks like a bean pot so I think it goes with the fire place to hold ashes or coals, that metal thing sticking out is a small shovel to remove the coals.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Wayne: steam juicer? Cool! Good one, you are right, I need one :) I have a centrifuge type juicer, but that's all.

And Wayne and Anne BOTH win with #3 is a dehorner! Intimidating beastie, ain't it? You can get some serious leverage with it.

#1 is not a bean pot, or a fondue pot, or an ash thing. The thing that sticks out of it is a handle, with a rock on the other end... It's a homesteady thing, old tech, not sure anyone uses them anymore. In the 1800's they were common.

#2 is still up for grabs, tell me if y'all want a hint :) It's a tool I moved because I will probably use it. I'm building a house/homestead type place, I moved a lot of tools to do things that most people don't use anymore, because I'm using a LOT of scavenged material, and it works different than buying new. New you'd probably just buy the exact thing you want instead of using the tools on it, I'm assuming I'll end up with what I can get, and modify it to work in my life. Date on the most useful time of that tool's life was probably the 1930's - 1960's.

This is WAY more fun than what I'm doing today work-wise :) And a good distraction from pain and illness, got 1.5 hours sleep last night, ugh.
 
Anne Miller
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So is #1 something like a mortar? Something for grinding corn?  Since it is a pot like thing maybe for making hominy grits?

#2 Is it for spliting wood after it has already been split like for kindling?
 
Anne Miller
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This image says:   Fire Starter Pot


 
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Is #2 for cutting/breaking tile or something brittle?  
 
Pearl Sutton
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Yay! Points for Anne! Firestarter pot.
You put kerosene, or paraffin or similar things in it, the rock is a porous stone and absorbs it. When you want to light a fire, you lay your wood, and then lay the stick half under it, with the wet rock in there. Light it, and your fire starts. Easier than kindling! They were popular in the 1800's, using all kinds of flammable oil products or turpentine.

#2 does not cut wood. Actually, I may try it to see if it does :) But it wasn't made to.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Mike: yes, not tile, but something brittle, yes. I have tile cutters also, my father was a master mason. I also have things like terrazzo tools.
I apprenticed with my dad for a while, but I was just not big enough, 5 gallon buckets of grout kick my ass bad. One job I had to haul grout up a three story ladder, even doing only 2 gallons at a time, I am just not big enough. I love the artwork of it, and learned a LOT, but I can only do it as a small thing, not as a job. So what did my dad cut with that tool? :)
 
wayne fajkus
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Asbestos siding?
Lonoleum squares?
 
Pearl Sutton
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Nope and Nope
Thicker. It's more a... hm... leverage for a focused break? Not sure of the word. Not a slicing cut, more a "break right here" cutter.
 
wayne fajkus
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Brick?
 
Pearl Sutton
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Crud, my computer crashed, try this again...

Ding ding ding! We have a winner! Wayne is correct, it cuts bricks.
It will cut red brick, pavers, any cementous material between about 1 and 5 inches thick. Red brick doesn't need scoring, pavers etc do because they are a coarser grain. I score pavers with a brick chisel (wide, not sharp) and then put the cutter where I want it to snap it (being a wuss, I sometimes put a cheater bar on it) and it snaps it nicely. Did you know you can buy red brick halves, that cost more than whole bricks? That's just weird in my book.

One of the things I sorted when I moved was my dad's ceramic tile storage, bits and pieces from a thousand jobs. We could often match old tile for people. I found a guy who wanted tile for upcycling furniture, and gave him 22 truck-fulls of asst tile, some 3 or 10 boxes of a color, some just a few pieces. LOTS of neat tile in there! I moved some neat old tile that we plan to use in our kitchen, enough tile to make a flowered bench in pinks and greens and creams, and a few bits of cobalt blues, purples, black etc that I can use for decorator bands on a plain field. All the rest went. I hated not being able to move more of it. At least I found someone who wanted it, I feared having to pay someone to dump it all.

Yay neat old tools my Dad had!!
 
wayne fajkus
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Looks like we are ready for new challenge. Dr jeckyl may have used this. What is it?
download-1.jpg
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Anne Miller
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Looks like a steam distiller maybe for essential oils.
 
wayne fajkus
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Wow. Nice guess. Essential oils could have been in his concoctions. But no, that is not correct.
 
wayne fajkus
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It was invented in 1830's for full disclosure.  Not sure time stamp for jeckyl and hyde. I bet its close though.

The very bottom does contain a flame source.
 
Anne Miller
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Vacuum coffee maker


 
wayne fajkus
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Yes. Also called siphon coffee maker. I ate at Gwendolyns restaurant in San Antonio . They use technology ruffly in the 1850's to cook your food. Nothing is plugged in. Perishables are sourced within 150 miles. This is how they made the coffee, table side. The coffee is in the top, the water is in the bottom. As the water heats up it ends up in the top with the coffee. At this point you remove the flame and the finished product ends up in the bottom. Remove top container and use the handle to pour it from bottom container into your cup. Totally awesome to watch.

Here is the actual pic. It was too obvious to post this one
20180801_200555_crop_384x422.jpg
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Anne Miller
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So what is this?

 
wayne fajkus
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What makes it different from the obvoius?

What it burns or what it does (not used for heating?)
 
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