Win a copy of Compost Teas for the Organic Grower this week in the Composting forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Devaka Cooray
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Dave Burton
  • Dan Boone
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
  • Mike Barkley

What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!

 
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Lauren Ritz wrote:From the look of it, it could make logs up to five or six inches in diameter. I'm sure they'd burn much faster than wood (especially with that "chimney" in the middle), but I see no reason that it wouldn't work. This one is obviously pretty old, probably early 20th century or late 19th since there's no manufacturing stamp of any kind. They didn't go to that kind of effort to make something that wasn't going to work.

The information I found about "problems" on the internet is pretty laughable--it could cause fires by igniting creosote in your fireplace (which is a moot point if you actually maintain your fireplace) and they burn too fast. Also (gasp!) they produce ash! People are silly.



Wonder how they'd do in a RMH? I poke poke at the wise Thomas Rubino, any idea?
Most people don't seem to maintain their fireplaces, no. Humans are VERY silly beasties.
I can see their points, if what you are going for is long slow burn (which is going to creosote up your chimney) adding a fast hot burning item doesn't work in your system. I'm a fan of the idea of masonry heaters in general, where you want to burn hot and fast, and heat your mass up. So if I end up burning anything in the house (which is iffy to start with) paper logs might feed a masonry mass heater of some sort. So I can see their point, within their system, but vote for a different system :)
 
gardener
Posts: 2195
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
268
cat pig rocket stoves
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Guys;
In my humble opinion...  they would be fine to use in a bell system rmh where ash buildup is just not a common issue.  
In a piped mass I would only use them with a full roaring burn and then only at the rear behind full pieces of wood.  

Ash buildup is an issue with a piped mass.  I had mine build up once and nearly destroyed a vacuum trying to get it all out. Now I know to rake as much into my transition area as I can, scoop that out and use a blower to push any left over ash rite up and out the vertical chimney (remove cap first) and watch it settle over everything outside.... first rain or a shot with the hose cleans it all up.


Watch for a post in rmh sometime in the next month (If it ever goes above freezing) when I document cleaning mine.   (I believe I currently have more ash than I like in there)
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you, Thomas! :)
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I bought 5 of these racks, I have seen them before, I may have some around already. I am wondering if anyone knows what they came out of? I know what I want to do with them, it's just bugging me I can't come up with what they were made for.

19 x 12 all with one corner beveled off. Shiny metal, looks like stainless, level welds, no raised or lowered parts.

 
pollinator
Posts: 190
Location: Golden Valley, AZ 86413
29
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:I bought 5 of these racks, I have seen them before, I may have some around already. I am wondering if anyone knows what they came out of? I know what I want to do with them, it's just bugging me I can't come up with what they were made for.

19 x 12 all with one corner beveled off. Shiny metal, looks like stainless, level welds, no raised or lowered parts.




The first thing that comes to my mind is that they are some sort of bin or shelf dividers. Are there any marks on them that would indicate if they were fastened to something?
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
No marks. They look clean, possibly unused? That thrift store didn't have anything that looked like shelving that would use them. The spacing is wide for shelving dividers unless the shelves hold big things. 4 inch spacing.
 
thomas rubino
gardener
Posts: 2195
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
268
cat pig rocket stoves
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Reminds me of window protector's on heavy equipment. But not enough vertical pieces.
 
Mark Kissinger
pollinator
Posts: 190
Location: Golden Valley, AZ 86413
29
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:No marks. They look clean, possibly unused? That thrift store didn't have anything that looked like shelving that would use them. The spacing is wide for shelving dividers unless the shelves hold big things. 4-inch spacing.



I imagine them being used vertically, perhaps to separate oversized books of maps or ledgers, as in a tax assessor's office, for instance. The shelving system would have some means of holding the dividers in place and making it easier to see which books may be in use..
 
pollinator
Posts: 210
Location: Utah
51
cat forest garden fungi foraging food preservation bee medical herbs writing greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
They look like oven trays, perhaps for a convection oven? They do look familiar, but I'm seeing them all banged up and covered with oven detritus.
 
Mark Kissinger
pollinator
Posts: 190
Location: Golden Valley, AZ 86413
29
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:I bought 5 of these racks, I have seen them before, I may have some around already. I am wondering if anyone knows what they came out of? I know what I want to do with them, it's just bugging me I can't come up with what they were made for.

19 x 12 all with one corner beveled off. Shiny metal, looks like stainless, level welds, no raised or lowered parts.



Here it is:
https://www.kitchensource.com/cabinet-organizers/rv-traydividers.htm

It comes in a 12" or an 18" size
Kitchen-organizerrv-597-spec-s3.jpg
[Thumbnail for Kitchen-organizerrv-597-spec-s3.jpg]
Rev-A-Shelf Kitchen Cabinet Wire Tray Dividers With Clips From KitchenSource.com
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Whoo! Thank you Mark!! I looked for shelf dividers, but was thinking more retail stuff.
YAY!! Thank you! :D
 
Mark Kissinger
pollinator
Posts: 190
Location: Golden Valley, AZ 86413
29
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:Whoo! Thank you Mark!! I looked for shelf dividers, but was thinking more retail stuff.
YAY!! Thank you! :D




Thank you for the apple!

Looks like you may be missing some clips. Maybe you can order them from Kitchen Source. Or perhaps you can find something that will work in the hardware bins at one of the hardware stores.
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just showed my mom the pictures of the rack and the way they were meant to be used. I got them for other reasons, but I think I'm going to use them pretty much for what they were made for, in a deep drawer, in the kitchen of our home. My current notes on the drawer has dimensions and a note "partitions" but unspecified how to make them when I'm making the drawers. I'll probably router out channels for them and maybe use some cable ties. Told my mom that I might use something for what it was originally made for, we both laughed, and said "that is just WRONG!" I don't DO that. I misuse and modify everything! :D
 
Mark Kissinger
pollinator
Posts: 190
Location: Golden Valley, AZ 86413
29
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:Just showed my mom the pictures of the rack and the way they were meant to be used. I got them for other reasons, but I think I'm going to use them pretty much for what they were made for, in a deep drawer, in the kitchen of our home. My current notes on the drawer has dimensions and a note "partitions" but unspecified how to make them when I'm making the drawers. I'll probably router out channels for them and maybe use some cable ties. Told my mom that I might use something for what it was originally made for, we both laughed, and said "that is just WRONG!" I don't DO that. I misuse and modify everything! :D



If you use a routered groove to install the dividers, you WILL be "doing it wrong", so your reputation is safe! LOL! I wouldn't have thought about using them in a deep drawer.
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mark Kissinger wrote:

Pearl Sutton wrote:Just showed my mom the pictures of the rack and the way they were meant to be used. I got them for other reasons, but I think I'm going to use them pretty much for what they were made for, in a deep drawer, in the kitchen of our home. My current notes on the drawer has dimensions and a note "partitions" but unspecified how to make them when I'm making the drawers. I'll probably router out channels for them and maybe use some cable ties. Told my mom that I might use something for what it was originally made for, we both laughed, and said "that is just WRONG!" I don't DO that. I misuse and modify everything! :D



If you use a routered groove to install the dividers, you WILL be "doing it wrong", so your reputation is safe! LOL! I wouldn't have thought about using them in a deep drawer.


I'll be doing it BETTER :D  
And we are putting only drawers in the kitchen, no shelves, no cabinets. Extra long, and sizes we choose.
I REALLY dislike stock cabinets.
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I went to a HUGE swap meet, and paid 1.00 for "a tool for removing tonsils." Really? Anyone know for sure?
Cool beastie! I had to bring it home....
The scale shot here doesn't look right. It's 6 inches long.



 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I also picked up one of these, it's rusted, but turns, haven't cleaned it yet, doesn't have the blade, at least, haven't looked close at it.
 
Mark Kissinger
pollinator
Posts: 190
Location: Golden Valley, AZ 86413
29
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:I went to a HUGE swap meet, and paid 1.00 for "a tool for removing tonsils." Really? Does anyone know for sure?
Cool beastie! I had to bring it home....
The scale shot here doesn't look right. It's 6 inches long.






It seems the correct size. It appears to be made of surgical steel. Here is my guess as to how it works:


The device is clamped over the base of the infected tonsil and the ball is compressed into the tonsil. The ball presses into the tissue while it is tied off. The clamp is held shut by engaging the tensioning device at the handle end of the instrument. When the tonsil is cut off it is gripped and sealed so that the infectious material inside does not have a chance to leak out.
tonsil-holder-106.jpg
[Thumbnail for tonsil-holder-106.jpg]
Tonsil Compression Forceps (Corwen) - Phisick | Medical Antiques
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mark: apple for you! That makes sense to me, Thank you!!
I do weird art/craft stuff and could easily think of uses for it, that's why I brought it home. I use strange clamp things for all kinds of odd purposes.
I love old weird tools...

:D
 
Posts: 7
Location: Los Angeles
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Phil Gardener wrote:

Ian Peartree wrote:Didn't go through the whole list, so I hope this hasn't been posted yet...



This use to stump me when I was a kid.



Eel fork?



Bang on!
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Apple for Phil Gardener for that one!
 
Posts: 37
Location: Aroostook county maine
3
dog tiny house homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I have one which may stump you all, my hubby makes and sells these. What is it?
20180814_204811.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20180814_204811.jpg]
 
Mark Kissinger
pollinator
Posts: 190
Location: Golden Valley, AZ 86413
29
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Jolene Jakesy wrote:I have one which may stump you all, my hubby makes and sells these. What is it?



Looks like an old-style "David & Goliath" sling.
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Apple for Mark!
 
Jolene Jakesy
Posts: 37
Location: Aroostook county maine
3
dog tiny house homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mark Kissinger wrote:

Jolene Jakesy wrote:I have one which may stump you all, my hubby makes and sells these. What is it?



Looks like an old-style "David & Goliath" sling.



Yup it's a shepherd sling great job!
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Not part of the what is it game, this is just "look what cool things I saw when looking for something else." I was looking online for a pic of an antique tool I used today, didn't find one, so I took one.  (Bad shot, my phone gets weird when I use flash.)



And I saw this!



Neat!
But then I saw THIS!



So I closed the browser before I got too excited about old tools today :D

 
Mark Kissinger
pollinator
Posts: 190
Location: Golden Valley, AZ 86413
29
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:Not part of the what is it game, this is just "look what cool things I saw when looking for something else." I was looking online for a pic of an antique tool I used today, didn't find one, so I took one.  (Bad shot, my phone gets weird when I use flash.)



And I saw this!



Neat!
But then I saw THIS!



So I closed the browser before I got too excited about old tools today :D




Too bad they're not part of the game.  The first one looks like a tool used in plumbing to tighten the drain cups (?) on sinks. Not sure what the small notch in the jaw would be used for, though.

The second one looks like it's spring loaded, perhaps some sort of alignment tool?  Pretty kool. Since it's old, I wonder what sort of equipment it was used on? If iit IS spring-loaded, and not screw adjustable, Each jaw would be only needed temporarily to lightly grip two different-sized pieces., but held in a specific alignment.clamps

The third on appears to have been manufactured in Dayton, Ohio, The brand seems to say "Neverfail", so I'd guess some sort of rigging or assembly tool that an aircraft mechanic would use, perhaps in a tight space where it wouldn't be convenient to have a bunch of tools to get in the way. It has a spanner with an extension which may have been used to provide extra leverage? There are two sizes of pipe jaws,and two holes that look like they could be wire cutters (or possibly wire grippers?) The two squarish-shaped  notches look like they might be used to keep the finished end of a wire form twisting, perhaps while an adjustment was being made, for example, when adjusting the length of a handbrake cable. Quite possibly, it could be an all-in-one tool for use on bicycles.

I really like imagining what an odd-looking tool might be used for.



 
master pollinator
Posts: 245
61
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I REALLY LOVE that one in the middle!! Too cool!
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mark Kissinger wrote:Too bad they're not part of the game.  The first one looks like a tool used in plumbing to tighten the drain cups (?) on sinks. Not sure what the small notch in the jaw would be used for, though.

The second one looks like it's spring loaded, perhaps some sort of alignment tool?  Pretty kool. Since it's old, I wonder what sort of equipment it was used on? If iit IS spring-loaded, and not screw adjustable, Each jaw would be only needed temporarily to lightly grip two different-sized pieces., but held in a specific alignment.clamps

The third on appears to have been manufactured in Dayton, Ohio, The brand seems to say "Neverfail", so I'd guess some sort of rigging or assembly tool that an aircraft mechanic would use, perhaps in a tight space where it wouldn't be convenient to have a bunch of tools to get in the way. It has a spanner with an extension which may have been used to provide extra leverage? There are two sizes of pipe jaws,and two holes that look like they could be wire cutters (or possibly wire grippers?) The two squarish-shaped  notches look like they might be used to keep the finished end of a wire form twisting, perhaps while an adjustment was being made, for example, when adjusting the length of a handbrake cable. Quite possibly, it could be an all-in-one tool for use on bicycles.


Not sure what the first one (the one I own) is made for, I used it to get into the hand tight nuts on the underside of a sink, someone glued them, I  had to break the glue joints. Put a rod into the hole for leverage. Hard to get anything up in that crack, someone needs a swift kick.

Second one is screw adjustable.

Third one, maybe I just have plumbing on the brain, but that's what I'd use it for. Metal piping, not plastic. The notches in the throat look like crimpers to me. Don't know. I want one :) That's why I closed the browser! I get all excited about them. Edit: Oops, that's got wire cutting notches too... hm.. Maybe it's just the thing you want in your pocket when you aren't sure what you are doing that day :D
My fascinations in life tend to be rust and lace....
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ok, let's break this one out into it's own post: What Is This Made To Do? Apple for the answer that covers ALL the tools on it. Including that square crimper hole in the throat...

 
Mark Kissinger
pollinator
Posts: 190
Location: Golden Valley, AZ 86413
29
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:Ok, let's break this one out into it's own post: What Is This Made To Do? Apple for the answer that covers ALL the tools on it. Including that square crimper hole in the throat...



Here is a great article I found on line about the Never-stall Windmill tool: http://www.pasttools.org/articles/combination_tools.htm All the functions are pointed out on the diagram.

As I suspected it was for use in a situation where one wouldn't want to have to carry a whole tool pouch. It reminds me of another combination tool for maintaining fences.

I have been watching a Australian TV series where a windmill is a featured story element, but they didn't use this tool on the ranch--it would have been perfect for the show.

I would never have thought the squarish notches in the handle would be for driving a thread tap.

1. adjustable wrench
2. hammer
3. pliers for pipe
4. wire/metal bender-gripper
5. staple-puller
6. small-jawed pipe pliers
7. screwdriver
8. chisel
10. nail puller
11. pry bar
12. wire cutter
13. nail cutter
14. large thread tap grippers
15. smaller thread tap gripper

Here is a diagram of the tool:


combotools1.jpg
[Thumbnail for combotools1.jpg]
Matthews
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Apple for Mark!
Cool!!
I still want one...
 
Mark Kissinger
pollinator
Posts: 190
Location: Golden Valley, AZ 86413
29
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pearl Sutton wrote:Apple for Mark!
Cool!!
I still want one...




Thanks for all those apples. I'm getting pretty good at this. Perhaps I should hold off a day to let others have a chance.

I still would like to know what that middle tool (in your original post) is used for. I looked it up online, someone wants $30 bucks for one. The ones being made now have independently adjustable jaws, instead of one adjustment for both jaws, but the new ones aren't as streamlined.

The device you used on your sink was used for exactly what it was designed for. (you must be slipping) LOL! It's called a plummer's wrench on the Home Depot site, and they still make them, but with a longer handle (but no hole in the handle to use for applying extra leverage). I like the one you have better--it's better for use in confined, pipe-filled spaces.
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mark Kissinger wrote:

Pearl Sutton wrote:Apple for Mark!
Cool!!
I still want one...




Thanks for all those apples. I'm getting pretty good at this. Perhaps I should hold off a day to let others have a chance.

I still would like to know what that middle tool is used for.



I think it's just an end wrench for multiple sizes. It's a screw adjust.
 
Carla Burke
master pollinator
Posts: 245
61
personal care gear foraging hunting rabbit chicken cooking food preservation fiber arts medical herbs homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The middle one is just a dual sized, adjustable wrench. I just like it, lol. But, that other one really can't be beat, for versatility!
 
Posts: 6
1
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is a pronged tool, stamped Pat Feb 11 1919, came from a farmhouse/barn ~ 100 years old in West Windsor, NJ, land being sold to be "developed". What is it? Dual prongs are ground flat on both top and bottom, and pointed; the throat-crossbar between is also sharpened on both the front and back edges. The gap behind the crossbar is ~6.5 in. to the metal handle-clasp area. Including a wooden handle, 35 in. long total. Something for tensioning heavy fence wire, perhaps?

P.S. Found it, ref. http://www.leevalley.com/US/newsletters/Gardening/1186/WhatIsIt.htm
-- it is a fancy weed-puller, designed to core and lift weed with entire root. I'm going to try it on some dandelions right now!
P.P.S. Quite useful tool; even though frequently 2 jabs are needed to find the weed root, the metalwork is strong enough to use as a pry-bar to break the root if need be. Entire root removed 20% of time, else partial root broken at 2 in. This also aerates the soil at the weed site. Note: I don't aim for a turfgrass monoculture, but yellow hawkweed, broad-leaf plantain, and eventually dandelion will push other spp. out, so I periodically knock them back, so to speak.
P1180179-Tool-Macro-Head-View.JPG
[Thumbnail for P1180179-Tool-Macro-Head-View.JPG]
P1180180-Tool-Detail-Prong-Profile.JPG
[Thumbnail for P1180180-Tool-Detail-Prong-Profile.JPG]
P1180181-Tool-Detail-Prong-Oblique-View.JPG
[Thumbnail for P1180181-Tool-Detail-Prong-Oblique-View.JPG]
P1180182-Tool-Detail-Prong-Tip.JPG
[Thumbnail for P1180182-Tool-Detail-Prong-Tip.JPG]
P1180183-Tool-Detail-Prong-from-Handle-End.JPG
[Thumbnail for P1180183-Tool-Detail-Prong-from-Handle-End.JPG]
P1180184-Tool-Top-End-of-Metal-Area.JPG
[Thumbnail for P1180184-Tool-Top-End-of-Metal-Area.JPG]
 
Pearl Sutton
gardener
Posts: 2431
Location: SW Missouri
701
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
OOH! Cool tool!!! :D
 
pioneer
Posts: 105
Location: Hessle, North Yorkshire, England, Uk
19
goat monies forest garden fungi trees books cooking writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Hi, it looks like a Jew's harp to me.
 
eric fisher
pioneer
Posts: 105
Location: Hessle, North Yorkshire, England, Uk
19
goat monies forest garden fungi trees books cooking writing
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ok guys check this out :
IMG_20190702_212735483.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_20190702_212735483.jpg]
 
no wonder he is so sad, he hasn't seen this tiny ad:
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/wiki/bootcamp
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!