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Upside down hugelkulture

 
Scott Stiller
Posts: 278
Location: North Carolina zone 7
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Good morning friends.
I have two large deep gullies on my property. I was thinking of getting all the material ready that I'd normally us for a hugelkulture and making a couple "gully cultures". I figure if I have all the material ready to go in I can build it up so the next big rain will not effect it. I've already taken steps to slow the flow to the gully. Suggestions or comments are greatly appreciated.
 
allen lumley
pollinator
Posts: 4153
Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
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books fungi hugelkultur solar wofati woodworking
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Scott Stiller : Any material that is laid crossways to the flow of the gully will slow it down and cause it to drop its suspended particles .

I have seen small crosswise trenches barely scratched across gullies into which old beams wood siding storm damaged materials and
even X-mass trees split in half lengthways and laid down to slow the flow of the water, this is more effective than pile in a brush pile
on top as most of the entanglement is above the coursing water !

A local boy scout troupe was able to follow these simple techniques to do a little gentle terra forming to create an amphitheater with
raised log seating and a flat as a billiard table Flat presentation space !

If your job is really big you could google Gabion baskets for erosion control, and there is also Gabion mattresses for medium
sized problems or just more help with the hard ones !

That permaculture guy from down under shows uses of Gabions in desert locations for stream control in a video on his Free Site !

Big AL
 
Scott Stiller
Posts: 278
Location: North Carolina zone 7
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Your suggestion is just what I needed! Started working on it today and I believe it will be a great success. Thank you.
 
allen lumley
pollinator
Posts: 4153
Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
58
books fungi hugelkultur solar wofati woodworking
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Scott Stiller : The use of double fist sized to adult head sized cobble stones to stabilize steeper banks of permanent and seasonal streams, and called rip-rap
when used for that purpose, is a common practice that can be found at multiple places where roadways and steams intersect. It is sometimes called streambank
Soil Bio-engineering when used with steam bank excavation and placement of fast growing primarily Willow shoots and cuttings !

If you are any where near farmland there will be large stone piles made from decades of stone removal from working fields, often a farmer will point you to a
pile near the due of a field with good road access and say help yourself, like the Gabion baskets this is a very labor in tensive way to recover terrain being lost
to erosion !

A google search for Rip rap design pictures will give you a good idea of common practices, and when you start looking you will find examples everywhere

For theGood of the Crafts ! big AL

 
Scott Stiller
Posts: 278
Location: North Carolina zone 7
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I took a couple pics of my start today. If all goes well I'll post along with successes and failures in a few months.
As far as rocks go, well I live in the middle of the Carolina slate belt. No problem there. I've actually been using Quartz to temper erosion in smaller areas with some success. I hate using Quartz though since it could be loaded with gold.
Anyway, thanks for your time Big Al. Someone give Big Al an apple for me. I don't think I can.
 
Scott Stiller
Posts: 278
Location: North Carolina zone 7
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So far so good. Winter pea, daikon, and winter rye.
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